International Marine - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – International Marine PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 68e649-MGZmZ



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

International Marine

Description:

Title: PowerPoint Presentation Author: LECTURER Last modified by: Bahaa Sharaf Created Date: 2/21/2003 7:16:10 PM Document presentation format: On-screen Show (4:3) – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:131
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 71
Provided by: lecturer
Learn more at: http://imoc-ksa2014.org
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: International Marine


1
Sustainable Use Of The Ocean The Role Of Marine
Technologists Omar bin Yaakob, FRINA Marine
Technology Centre Universiti Teknologi Malaysia
International Marine Offshore Engineering
Conference Al Jubail Saudi Arabia 3rd 4th
September 2014
2
Sustainability and sustainable development
3
Sustainable Development
  • Development which meets the needs of the present
    without compromising the ability of future
    generations to meet their own needs
  • Our Common Future (Bruntland Report), 1987
  • A dynamic process which enables all people to
    realise their potential and improve their quality
    of life in ways which simultaneously protect and
    enhance the Earths support systems
  • Forum for the Future (UK)

Economic
Environmental
Social
4
Sustainable Way of Life
A way of life that safeguards and enhances our
resources, prevents harm to the natural
environment and human health, and sustains and
benefits the community and local economy for
the sake of current and future generations.
-Santa Monica Sustainable City Program
5
Key events in sustainable development
discourse 1983-1987 World Commission on
Environment and Development (known as the
Brundtland Commission). "Humanity has the ability
to make development sustainable - to ensure that
it meets the needs of the present without
compromising the ability of future generations to
meet their own needs 1992 The United Nations
Conference on Environment and Development Rio de
Janeiro. o Rio Declaration on Environment
and Development o Agenda 21 o
Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)
6
UN FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE (UNFCC)
  • Entered into force on 21 March 1994. As of March
    2014, UNFCCC has 196 parties.
  • The parties to the convention have met annually
    from 1995 in Conferences of the Parties (COP) to
    assess progress in dealing with climate change.
  • 1997, the Kyoto Protocol established legally
    binding obligations for developed countries to
    reduce their greenhouse gas emissions.
  • 16th COP in Cancún agreed that future global
    warming should be limited to below 2.0 C (3.6
    F) relative to the pre-industrial level

7
UN Conference on Sustainable Development held in
Rio de Janeiro in 2012. (Rio 20)
Outcome A document, entitled The Future We
Want.
Governments agreed that the UN General Assembly
should launch a process to establish a set of
specific Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs),
together with a strategy to finance their
implementation. To develop the SDGs, a
30-member Open Working Group of the UN General
Assembly was established in January 2013.
8
Ocean sustainability
9
Inputs from the Ocean Stakeholders
  • Sustainable development goal for oceans and
    coasts to face the challenges for our future
    ocean
  • Ensure basic life-sustaining and regulating
    functions of the oceans
  • Ensure a healthy and productive marine
    environment to sustain all provisioning and
    non-provisioning services of oceans and coasts
  • Build resilient coastal communities through
    mitigation and adaptation strategies, innovation
    and sustainable development, by sharing benefits
    and responsibilities
  • Engage in integrated and multi-level ocean
    governance. The proposal does not contain
    any timelines or indicators.

Prof. MartinVisbeck et al., Kiel University,
Germany (2013 http//fileserver.futureocean.org/f
orschung/r1/ocean_sustainability_visbeck_et_al.pdf
).
10
Inputs from the Ocean Stakeholders
  • Healthy seas and oceans (blue economy) with five
    priority areas
  • Protection of marine biodiversity
  • Elimination of unsustainable fishing practices
  • Reduction of marine pollution
  • Monitoring of ocean acidification
  • Conservation of biodiversity in areas beyond
    national jurisdiction.

Civil Society Organizations at 64th Annual UN
Department of Public Information NGO Conference
(2011 http//www.un.org/wcm/content/site/ngoconf
erence/resources/final)
11
IOC/UNESCO, IMO, FAO, UNDP (2011), A BLUEPRINT
FOR OCEAN AND COASTAL SUSTAINABILITY, PARIS
IOC/UNESCO, UNITED NATIONS
12
  1. Implement Urgent Actions to Mitigate and Adapt to
    Ocean Acidification
  2. Develop and Execute a Global Program aimed at
    Greater Protection and Restoration of Vital Ocean
    and Coastal Habitats, and develop a Global Blue
    Carbon Market as a means of Creating Direct
    Economic Gain through Habitat Protection
  3. Strengthen the Legal Framework to Effectively
    Address Aquatic Invasive Species
  4. Build Green Societies in Small Island Developing
    StatesAddressing Key Vulnerabilities
  5. Increase Efforts for Responsible Fisheries and
    Aquaculture in a Green Economy

IOC/UNESCO, IMO, FAO, UNDP (2011). A Blueprint
for Ocean and Coastal Sustainability. Paris
IOC/UNESCO, United Nations
13
  1. Green the Nutrient Economy and Reduce Ocean
    Hypoxia through Policy, Regulatory and Economic
    Instruments that Promote Nutrient Efficiency and
    Recovery
  2. Create and Implement an Institutional and Legal
    Framework to Protect Habitats and Biodiversity
    Beyond National Jurisdiction
  3. Reform Regional Ocean Management Organisations
  4. Enhance Coordination, Coherence and Effectiveness
    of the UN System on Oceans Issues
  5. Increase Institutional and Human Capacity for
    Sustained Observations, Monitoring, Marine
    Research, and Progress Evaluation of
    International Commitments

IOC/UNESCO, IMO, FAO, UNDP (2011). A Blueprint
for Ocean and Coastal Sustainability. Paris
IOC/UNESCO, United Nations
14
International Maritime Organisation, Sustainable
Maritime Transportation System, London, 2013.
15
..A Sustainable Maritime Transportation System
entail partnerships between Governments, ship
builders, classification societies,
manufacturers, RD establishments and academic
institutions. The maritime transport industry
should take advantage of new technology in order
to maximize its environmental performance as well
as to enhance safety, and be prepared for new
cargo types and new trades.
International Maritime Organisation, Sustainable
Maritime Transportation System, London, 2013.
16
Latest Updates on SDGs
In July 2014 UN Open Working Group on
Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) submitted
seventeen SDGs to the UN General Assembly,
including Ocean SDG. Goal "Conserve and
sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine
resources for sustainable development".
17
  • Specific Targets of The Ocean SDG include
  • Preventing and significantly reducing marine
    pollution of all kinds by 2025.
  • Sustainably managing and protecting marine and
    coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse
    impacts by 2020.
  • Minimizing and addressing the impacts of ocean
    acidification no target date.
  • Restoring fish stocks by regulating harvesting,
    ending overfishing, illegal, unreported and
    unregulated (IUU) fishing and destructive
    fishing, and implementing science-based
    management by 2020.

?
?
?
?
?
?
?
18
  1. Conserving at least 10 of coastal and marine
    areas by 2020.
  2. Prohibiting certain fisheries subsidies which
    contribute to overcapacity and overfishing,
    eliminating subsidies that contribute to IUU
    fishing, and refraining from introducing new such
    subsidies by 2020.
  3. Increasing the economic benefits to small island
    developing states and least developed countries
    from the sustainable use of marine resources by
    2030.

?
?
?
?
?
?
?
19
Three issues IN shipping and sustainability
20
Global Warming
Ocean Acidification
21
Marine pollution
22
22
23
Shipping Sustainability
  • Regulations/Conventions
  • MARPOL 73/78
  • Annexe I (oil)
  • Annexe II (chemicals in bulk)
  • Annexe III (chemicals in packaged form)
  • Annexe IV (sewage)
  • Annexe V (garbage)
  • Annexe VI (air emissions)

24
Global Warming
Ocean Acidification
25
Alien invasion!!
26
Shipping Sustainability
27
  • International Convention for the Control and
    Management of Ships Ballast Water and Sediments
    (the Ballast Water Management or BWM Convention)
    Ballast Water Convention 2004.
  • Two standards
  • D1 Ballast Water Exchange
  • D2 Ballast water Treatment for all ships from
    2016
  • REQUIRED FOR RATIFICATION 30 COUNTRIES/35 WORLD
    TONNAGE
  • AS OF NOW 38/30.38

28
Elements of BWM
Balaji, R., Yaakob, O. and Koh, K.K.
(2014). A Review of Developments in Ballast Water
Management. Environmental Reviews. doi
10.1139/er-2013-0073.
29
Global Warming
Ocean Acidification
30
The carbon dioxide MENACE
31
Carbon Dioxide
Global warming (Green House effect)
Ocean Acidification
32
Credit Richard A. Feely, Pacific Marine
Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration, USA, with atmospheric
data from Pieter Tans and seawater data from
David Karl. Adapted from Feely (2008) in Levinson
and Lawrimore (eds), Bull. Am. Meteorol. Soc,
89(7) S58.
33
(No Transcript)
34
Our study showed that all animal groups we
considered are affected negatively by higher
carbon dioxide concentrations. Corals,
echinoderms and mollusks above all react very
sensitively to a decline in the pH value, said
study co-author Astrid Wittmann, a marine
biologist from AWI. Read more at
http//www.redorbit.com/news/science/1112931596/oc
ean-acidification-affects-species-differently-0826
13/TzHmHMYoG6fTkVV8.99
35
(No Transcript)
36
CO2 Emissions per Unit Load by Transport Mode
SourceMinistry of Land, Infrastructure and
Transport (Japan) The Survey on Transport Energy
2001/2002 MOL (Japan) Environmental and Social
Report 2004
Shipping energy efficient
37
Second IMO GHG Study 2009 2007 CO2 Emissions For
International Shipping in million tonnes CO2
Low bound Consensus High bound
Total shipping emissions (activity based) 854 1019 1224
Total less fishing (activity based) 796 954 1150
IEA domestic shipping (statistical data) 111 111 111
International shipping (hybrid estimate) 685 843 1039
  • 1Consensus estimate 843 million tonnes CO2 2.7

38
World Fleet Fuel Consumption (2007)
2007 Low bound Best High bound
Total fuel consumption 279 333 400
Bottom-up (Activity-based) estimates
Top-down (Fuel-sales) data
39
Depending on future economic and energy
developments, this study's BAU scenarios project
an increase (in maritime CO2) by 50 to 250 in
the period to 2050
40
Landmark decision during mepc 62, (11-15 July
2011)
  • Parties to MARPOL Annex VI of the International
    Maritime Organization (IMO) adopted (by voting
    48-5) mandatory measures to reduce emissions of
    greenhouse gases (GHGs) from international
    shipping.
  • This the first ever mandatory global greenhouse
    gas reduction regime for an international
    industry sector.

41

The amendments to MARPOL Annex VI Regulations for
the prevention of air pollution from ships, add a
new chapter 4 to Annex VI on Regulations on
energy efficiency for ships to make mandatory the
Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI), for new
ships 2013 januar from 1st, and the Ship Energy
Efficiency Management Plan (SEEMP) for all ships.
42

EEDI APPLICABILITY for new vessels o
Tankers o Bulk carriers o Gas Tankers o
Containership o General cargo Ships o
Refrigerated Cargo carrier o Combination
Carrier o Passenger Ships o Ro-ro cargo ships
SEEMP will be required for all ships including
MODU, FPSO and FSU. For existing ships, the
verification of the requirements to have SEEMP on
board shall take place t the first immediate or
renewal survey whichever is first on or after 1st
January 2013.
43
EEDI and SEEMP Effects
44
IMPROVING SHIP EFFICIENCY
45
Carbon Dioxide
Global warming (Green House effect)
Ocean Acidification
  1. Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI) for new
    ships
  2. Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan (SEEMP)
    for all ships using the Energy Efficiency
    Operational Indicator (EEOI) as monitoring tool
    and for benchmarking

INCREASE EFFICIENCY OF SHIPS
46
Economy of Size

www.wartsila.com/
47
14,000 TEU vessel MSC Danit and MSC Daniela (Dec 2008) This is the largest ever built and able to accomodate up to 14,000 twenty-foot-equivalent containers. Overall length of 366 meters The ships design incorporates high-tensile steel to reduce bending increase stiffness in the hull. This reduces the thickness of the steel plate, for strong but lightweight construction.

48
 18,000 TEU Triple-E LOA 400m
  • The Triple-E emits 50 less than the industry
    average on the Asia-Europe trade lane.
  • The vessels are equipped with a waste heat
    recovery system, saving up to 10 of main engine
    power.


Economy of scale, Energy efficient and
Environmentally improved
49
Operational Approach
Extract as much energy as possible
Use other energy sources
Fuel Saving Ships
Improve conversion of Power to Thrust
Reduce Drag/resistance
Improve conversion of fuel to power
50
OCEAN RENEWABLE ENERGY
51
Ocean Energy Concepts
Source Concepts Devices
Ocean Thermal Gradient Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion
Tidal range (difference between low tide and high tide) Tidal Barrage
Tidal stream current Vertical Axis Current Turbine Horizontal Axis Current Turbine
Ocean Waves Wave Energy Converter
Ocean Salinity gradient reverse electrodialysis (RED) and pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO)
52
We should not overstate the potential of Ocean
Energy Be realistic
  • Theoretical resource theoretical energy content
    in the resource, without consideration of
    technology or constraints.
  • Technical resource is that part of the
    theoretical resource that could be extracted
    using available technology options.
  • Practical resource is the proportion of the
    technical resource that could be exploited taking
    into consideration of external constraints such
    as distance to point of use, local physical
    accessibility, competing uses and environmental
    sensitivity

Omar bin Yaakob and Kho King Koh,The Promise of
Marine Renewable Energy in Malaysia Too Good To
Be True? Malaysian Journal of Science 32 (SCS Sp
Issue) 309-316 (2013)
53
(No Transcript)
54
(No Transcript)
55
PREPARING FUTURE SHIP DESiGNERS AND MARINE
ENGINEERS
56
We can no longer keep designing things in the
same old way.
  • Ship designers and marine engineers of the
    future need to think differently.

57
REDefining Traditional SHIP DESIGN
  • In Traditional Ship Design
  • required to develop solutions problems they are
    presented with to the best of their knowledge
  • within the owners requirements and operational
    constraints.
  • constraints of approval authorities/classification
    rules/ international rules and regulations
  • within schedule and financial constraints
  • Naval architects/ship designers search for
    methods that maximize function, and minimize cost
    to clients

58
Traditional Ship Design
Maximizing utility while minimizing the cost to
the
client
Shift in Mindset
Maximize social benefit while minimizing
ecological impact
59
Traditional SHIP DESIGN CRITERIA
  • Function
  • Cost
  • Safety

Sustainable Ship Design Criteria
  • The above plus
  • Impact on people (society)
  • Impact on the planet (environment)

60
ABET (2012), CRITERIA FOR ACCREDITING ENGINEERING
PROGRAMS, Accreditation Board for Engineering
and Technology, Inc Criterion 3. Student Outcomes
(a) an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics,
science, and engineering (b) an ability to
design and conduct experiments, as well as to
analyze and interpret data (c) an ability to
design a system, component, or process to meet
desired needs within realistic constraints such
as economic, environmental, social, political,
ethical, health and safety, manufacturability,
and sustainability (d) an ability to function on
multidisciplinary teams (e) an ability to
identify, formulate, and solve engineering
problems (f) an understanding of professional
and ethical responsibility (g) an ability to
communicate effectively (h) the broad education
necessary to understand the impact of engineering
solutions in a global, economic, environmental,
and societal context (i) a recognition of the
need for, and an ability to engage in life-long
learning (j) a knowledge of contemporary issues
(k) an ability to use the techniques, skills,
and modern engineering tools necessary for
engineering practice.
(c) an ability to design a system, component, or
process to meet desired needs within realistic
constraints such as economic, environmental,
social, political, ethical, health and safety,
manufacturability, and sustainability
PO1 Knowledge - Breadth A knowledge of mathematics,engineering science,ICT,design, and legislative and regulatory framework applicable to marine engineering
PO2 Knowledge - Kind The ability to identify, formulate and analyse marine engineering problems. Understands relevant scientific concepts including their limitations, which develop and enable abstract thinking for problem solving. Can demonstrate an understanding of the advantages and limitations of core mathematical formula and technologies used in marine engineering design. Has knowledge of the core components used in marine engineering systems. Understands their role within the engineering team.
PO3 Skill - Range The ability to select and apply appropriate mathematical and scientific techniques to solve problems in marine engineering using well described procedures and drawing limited conclusions. Can use computer based engineering tools. Can plan and develop a project and use an evidence-based approach to problem solving.
PO4 Skill - Selectivity The ability to select an appropriate systematic mathematical/analytical/scientific method to solve problems while understanding the accuracy of such methods when proposing solutions. Can undertake routine practical or simulated testing of systems and report and comment on results.
PO5 Competence - Context The ability to select and apply mathematical and scientific techniques to the supervision and maintenance of marine engineering systems. The graduate has an awareness of the ethical implication involved in working at sea and can work in a safe and environmentally sound manner.
PO6 Competence - Role An awareness of the role of a multidisciplinary shipboard team and has the ability to work as an effective member of this team or as an individual. Can exercise independent technical judgement and has the ability to lead engineering teams.
PO7 Competence - Learning to Learn The ability to identify and address learning needs professionally and at a personal levelto keep abreast of developments in technology and the maritime regulatory framework.
PO8 Competence - Insight A broad knowledge of social,political and economic factors relevant to marine engineeringto maintain high ethical standards in engineering practice towards people and the environment.
61
Some Learning Outcomes
Bachelor in Marine Engineering Technology The
Outcomes of the Marine Engineering Technology
major are as follows Students will demonstrate
the following through the Marine Engineering
Technology program of study at the
Academy   a.      An appropriate mastery of the
knowledge, techniques, skills and modern tools of
their disciplines. b.      An ability to apply
current knowledge and adapt to emerging
applications of mathematics, science, engineering
and technology. c.      An ability to conduct,
analyze and interpret experiments and apply
experimental results to improve
processes. d.      An ability to apply creativity
in the design of systems, components or processes
appropriate to program objectives. e.      An
ability to function effectively on
teams. f.       An ability to identify, analyze
and solve technical problems. g.     An ability
to communicate effectively. h.      A recognition
of the need for, and an ability to engage in
lifelong learning. i.       An ability to
understand professional, ethical and social
responsibilities. j.       A respect for
diversity and a knowledge of contemporary
professional, societal and global issues. k.     
A commitment to quality, timeliness, and
continuous improvement.
Bachelor in Marine Engineering Technology i.     
  An ability to understand professional, ethical
and social responsibilities. j.       A respect
for diversity and a knowledge of contemporary
professional, societal and global issues.
62
Bachelor of Engineering in Marine
Engineering Programme Outcomes On successful
completion of this programme the learner will be
able to
PO8 Competence - Insight A broad knowledge of social,political and economic factors relevant to marine engineering to maintain high ethical standards in engineering practice towards people and the environment.
PO1 Knowledge - Breadth A knowledge of mathematics,engineering science,ICT,design, and legislative and regulatory framework applicable to marine engineering
PO2 Knowledge - Kind The ability to identify, formulate and analyse marine engineering problems. Understands relevant scientific concepts including their limitations, which develop and enable abstract thinking for problem solving. Can demonstrate an understanding of the advantages and limitations of core mathematical formula and technologies used in marine engineering design. Has knowledge of the core components used in marine engineering systems. Understands their role within the engineering team.
PO3 Skill - Range The ability to select and apply appropriate mathematical and scientific techniques to solve problems in marine engineering using well described procedures and drawing limited conclusions. Can use computer based engineering tools. Can plan and develop a project and use an evidence-based approach to problem solving.
PO4 Skill - Selectivity The ability to select an appropriate systematic mathematical/analytical/scientific method to solve problems while understanding the accuracy of such methods when proposing solutions. Can undertake routine practical or simulated testing of systems and report and comment on results.
PO5 Competence - Context The ability to select and apply mathematical and scientific techniques to the supervision and maintenance of marine engineering systems. The graduate has an awareness of the ethical implication involved in working at sea and can work in a safe and environmentally sound manner.
PO6 Competence - Role An awareness of the role of a multidisciplinary shipboard team and has the ability to work as an effective member of this team or as an individual. Can exercise independent technical judgement and has the ability to lead engineering teams.
PO7 Competence - Learning to Learn The ability to identify and address learning needs professionally and at a personal levelto keep abreast of developments in technology and the maritime regulatory framework.
PO8 Competence - Insight A broad knowledge of social,political and economic factors relevant to marine engineeringto maintain high ethical standards in engineering practice towards people and the environment.
63
B.Eng. Marine Technology Learning Outcomes
The programme provides opportunities for
students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and
understanding, qualities, skills and other
attributes in the following areas.
5. To encourage students to develop awareness and
responsible attitudes towards the needs of
society and the environment in the application of
their engineering knowledge, including a regard
for safety appropriate to their profession.
PO1 Knowledge - Breadth A knowledge of mathematics,engineering science,ICT,design, and legislative and regulatory framework applicable to marine engineering
PO2 Knowledge - Kind The ability to identify, formulate and analyse marine engineering problems. Understands relevant scientific concepts including their limitations, which develop and enable abstract thinking for problem solving. Can demonstrate an understanding of the advantages and limitations of core mathematical formula and technologies used in marine engineering design. Has knowledge of the core components used in marine engineering systems. Understands their role within the engineering team.
PO3 Skill - Range The ability to select and apply appropriate mathematical and scientific techniques to solve problems in marine engineering using well described procedures and drawing limited conclusions. Can use computer based engineering tools. Can plan and develop a project and use an evidence-based approach to problem solving.
PO4 Skill - Selectivity The ability to select an appropriate systematic mathematical/analytical/scientific method to solve problems while understanding the accuracy of such methods when proposing solutions. Can undertake routine practical or simulated testing of systems and report and comment on results.
PO5 Competence - Context The ability to select and apply mathematical and scientific techniques to the supervision and maintenance of marine engineering systems. The graduate has an awareness of the ethical implication involved in working at sea and can work in a safe and environmentally sound manner.
PO6 Competence - Role An awareness of the role of a multidisciplinary shipboard team and has the ability to work as an effective member of this team or as an individual. Can exercise independent technical judgement and has the ability to lead engineering teams.
PO7 Competence - Learning to Learn The ability to identify and address learning needs professionally and at a personal levelto keep abreast of developments in technology and the maritime regulatory framework.
PO8 Competence - Insight A broad knowledge of social,political and economic factors relevant to marine engineeringto maintain high ethical standards in engineering practice towards people and the environment.
64
Bachelor of Engineering with Honours in
Mechanical and Marine Engineering Students
should be able to B6. Demonstrate an awareness
of the framework of relevant legal requirements
governing engineering activities, including
personnel, health, safety, and risk (including
environmental risk) issues
PO1 Knowledge - Breadth A knowledge of mathematics,engineering science,ICT,design, and legislative and regulatory framework applicable to marine engineering
PO2 Knowledge - Kind The ability to identify, formulate and analyse marine engineering problems. Understands relevant scientific concepts including their limitations, which develop and enable abstract thinking for problem solving. Can demonstrate an understanding of the advantages and limitations of core mathematical formula and technologies used in marine engineering design. Has knowledge of the core components used in marine engineering systems. Understands their role within the engineering team.
PO3 Skill - Range The ability to select and apply appropriate mathematical and scientific techniques to solve problems in marine engineering using well described procedures and drawing limited conclusions. Can use computer based engineering tools. Can plan and develop a project and use an evidence-based approach to problem solving.
PO4 Skill - Selectivity The ability to select an appropriate systematic mathematical/analytical/scientific method to solve problems while understanding the accuracy of such methods when proposing solutions. Can undertake routine practical or simulated testing of systems and report and comment on results.
PO5 Competence - Context The ability to select and apply mathematical and scientific techniques to the supervision and maintenance of marine engineering systems. The graduate has an awareness of the ethical implication involved in working at sea and can work in a safe and environmentally sound manner.
PO6 Competence - Role An awareness of the role of a multidisciplinary shipboard team and has the ability to work as an effective member of this team or as an individual. Can exercise independent technical judgement and has the ability to lead engineering teams.
PO7 Competence - Learning to Learn The ability to identify and address learning needs professionally and at a personal levelto keep abreast of developments in technology and the maritime regulatory framework.
PO8 Competence - Insight A broad knowledge of social,political and economic factors relevant to marine engineeringto maintain high ethical standards in engineering practice towards people and the environment.
65
Bachelor in Naval Architecture
a holistic approach when making professional
decisions, balancing the costs, benefits, safety,
quality, reliability, appearance and
environmental impact.
PO1 Knowledge - Breadth A knowledge of mathematics,engineering science,ICT,design, and legislative and regulatory framework applicable to marine engineering
PO2 Knowledge - Kind The ability to identify, formulate and analyse marine engineering problems. Understands relevant scientific concepts including their limitations, which develop and enable abstract thinking for problem solving. Can demonstrate an understanding of the advantages and limitations of core mathematical formula and technologies used in marine engineering design. Has knowledge of the core components used in marine engineering systems. Understands their role within the engineering team.
PO3 Skill - Range The ability to select and apply appropriate mathematical and scientific techniques to solve problems in marine engineering using well described procedures and drawing limited conclusions. Can use computer based engineering tools. Can plan and develop a project and use an evidence-based approach to problem solving.
PO4 Skill - Selectivity The ability to select an appropriate systematic mathematical/analytical/scientific method to solve problems while understanding the accuracy of such methods when proposing solutions. Can undertake routine practical or simulated testing of systems and report and comment on results.
PO5 Competence - Context The ability to select and apply mathematical and scientific techniques to the supervision and maintenance of marine engineering systems. The graduate has an awareness of the ethical implication involved in working at sea and can work in a safe and environmentally sound manner.
PO6 Competence - Role An awareness of the role of a multidisciplinary shipboard team and has the ability to work as an effective member of this team or as an individual. Can exercise independent technical judgement and has the ability to lead engineering teams.
PO7 Competence - Learning to Learn The ability to identify and address learning needs professionally and at a personal levelto keep abreast of developments in technology and the maritime regulatory framework.
PO8 Competence - Insight A broad knowledge of social,political and economic factors relevant to marine engineeringto maintain high ethical standards in engineering practice towards people and the environment.
66
Bachelor of Engineering (Naval Architecture and
Offshore Engineering)
PO6 Ability to identify the impact of naval architecture and offshore engineering solutions on sustainability and demonstrate the needs for sustainable development
PO1 Knowledge - Breadth A knowledge of mathematics,engineering science,ICT,design, and legislative and regulatory framework applicable to marine engineering
PO2 Knowledge - Kind The ability to identify, formulate and analyse marine engineering problems. Understands relevant scientific concepts including their limitations, which develop and enable abstract thinking for problem solving. Can demonstrate an understanding of the advantages and limitations of core mathematical formula and technologies used in marine engineering design. Has knowledge of the core components used in marine engineering systems. Understands their role within the engineering team.
PO3 Skill - Range The ability to select and apply appropriate mathematical and scientific techniques to solve problems in marine engineering using well described procedures and drawing limited conclusions. Can use computer based engineering tools. Can plan and develop a project and use an evidence-based approach to problem solving.
PO4 Skill - Selectivity The ability to select an appropriate systematic mathematical/analytical/scientific method to solve problems while understanding the accuracy of such methods when proposing solutions. Can undertake routine practical or simulated testing of systems and report and comment on results.
PO5 Competence - Context The ability to select and apply mathematical and scientific techniques to the supervision and maintenance of marine engineering systems. The graduate has an awareness of the ethical implication involved in working at sea and can work in a safe and environmentally sound manner.
PO6 Competence - Role An awareness of the role of a multidisciplinary shipboard team and has the ability to work as an effective member of this team or as an individual. Can exercise independent technical judgement and has the ability to lead engineering teams.
PO7 Competence - Learning to Learn The ability to identify and address learning needs professionally and at a personal levelto keep abreast of developments in technology and the maritime regulatory framework.
PO8 Competence - Insight A broad knowledge of social,political and economic factors relevant to marine engineeringto maintain high ethical standards in engineering practice towards people and the environment.
67
Concluding remarks
68
Concluding Remarks
  1. The earth (including the ocean) is suffering
    from anthropogenic activities.
  2. Sustainable development principles and
    considerations need to be taken onboard all our
    activities.
  3. Ship designers and marine engineers have big
    roles to play to improve sustainable shipping
  4. Besides sustainable shipping initiatives, ocean
    renewable energy can contribute to reduction of
    CO2.
  5. Students education and training need shift to
    incorporate sustainability awareness and practice.

PO1 Knowledge - Breadth A knowledge of mathematics,engineering science,ICT,design, and legislative and regulatory framework applicable to marine engineering
PO2 Knowledge - Kind The ability to identify, formulate and analyse marine engineering problems. Understands relevant scientific concepts including their limitations, which develop and enable abstract thinking for problem solving. Can demonstrate an understanding of the advantages and limitations of core mathematical formula and technologies used in marine engineering design. Has knowledge of the core components used in marine engineering systems. Understands their role within the engineering team.
PO3 Skill - Range The ability to select and apply appropriate mathematical and scientific techniques to solve problems in marine engineering using well described procedures and drawing limited conclusions. Can use computer based engineering tools. Can plan and develop a project and use an evidence-based approach to problem solving.
PO4 Skill - Selectivity The ability to select an appropriate systematic mathematical/analytical/scientific method to solve problems while understanding the accuracy of such methods when proposing solutions. Can undertake routine practical or simulated testing of systems and report and comment on results.
PO5 Competence - Context The ability to select and apply mathematical and scientific techniques to the supervision and maintenance of marine engineering systems. The graduate has an awareness of the ethical implication involved in working at sea and can work in a safe and environmentally sound manner.
PO6 Competence - Role An awareness of the role of a multidisciplinary shipboard team and has the ability to work as an effective member of this team or as an individual. Can exercise independent technical judgement and has the ability to lead engineering teams.
PO7 Competence - Learning to Learn The ability to identify and address learning needs professionally and at a personal levelto keep abreast of developments in technology and the maritime regulatory framework.
PO8 Competence - Insight A broad knowledge of social,political and economic factors relevant to marine engineeringto maintain high ethical standards in engineering practice towards people and the environment.
69
"Humanity has come perilously close to reversing
the almost miraculous biological abundance of the
deep, Alan B. Sielen, The Devolution of the
Seas, Foreign Affairs (November/December 2013).
70
omar_at_fkm.utm.my
About PowerShow.com