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First Amendment Freedoms

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Date added: 19 July 2019
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Title: First Amendment Freedoms


1
First Amendment Freedoms
2
A. Unalienable Rights
  • The Declaration of Independence speaks of
    unalienable rights endowed by their Creator
    such as life, liberty, and the pursuit of
    happiness.
  • This means that we are born with rights that no
    one can take away from us.

3
C. The Bill of Rights
  • The first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution.
  • Guarantees protection against arbitrary actions
    of the national government.

4
F. Freedom of Religion
  • The first amendment guaranteed freedom of
    religion through the Establishment Clause and
    the Free Exercise Clause.

5
G. Establishment Clause
  • Thomas Jefferson said that the Constitutions
    Establishment Clause set up a separation
    between church and state.
  • The government cannot favor one religion over
    another.
  • The wall separating church and state is
    constantly being built and varies in height from
    time to time.

6
Establishment Clause Court Rulings
(Constitutional ?)
  • A. Tax-supported busing of students to nonpublic
    schools (yes)
  • B. Programs to let public school students to take
    time off from school to attend religious
    instruction on private property (yes)
  • C. Organized prayers in schools (no)
  • D. Bible-reading ceremonies in schools (no)
  • E. Student-run religious clubs in public schools
    (yes)

7
Establishment Clause Court Rulings
(Constitutional ?)
  • F. State law prohibiting the teaching of
    evolution (no)
  • G. Seasonal displays of religious items on public
    property (yes)
  • H. Paying chaplains in state legislatures with
    public funds (yes)
  • I. Tax exemptions given to churches (yes)

8
H. The Free Exercise Clause
  • Guarantees to all people the right to whatever
    religious beliefs they choose.
  • It does not give people the right to act on any
    belief.
  • A person may notbreak laws, be indecent
    publicly, or put others health, welfare, or
    safety in danger in the name of religion

9
Examples of Limitations to Free Exercise
  • Requirements to vaccinate school children.
  • Forbid the use of poisonous snakes in religious
    rites.
  • The federal government can draft those who have
    religious objections to military service.

10
I. Freedom of Speech and Press
  • Congress shall make no lawabridging the freedom
    of speech or of the press

11
1st and 14th Amendments and Freedom of Speech
  • Key points concerning freedom of speech
  • The guarantees are intended to protect the
    expression of unpopular views.
  • Some forms of expression are not protected by the
    Constitution.

12
Speech and Press that is not Protected
  • Libel- the false and malicious use of printed
    words
  • Slander- the false and malicious use of spoken
    words
  • Obscene words or materials
  • False advertising

13
Freedom of Expression
  • Freedom of expression is legal if it does not
    threaten our national security.
  • The government can punish crimes against the
    nation, such as espionage, sabotage, sedition,
    treason.

14
National Security Issues
  • Espionage-spying for a foreign country
  • Sabotage-destroying something to stop or slow
    down a nations war or defense effort
  • Sedition-encouraging others, through spoken or
    written words, to resist lawful authority
  • Treason-going to war against the nation or
    supporting its enemies

15
J. Freedom of Assembly and Petition
  • People have the right to get together and share
    their opinions. They can organize themselves to
    try to change public policy. They also have the
    right to tell public officials what they think.

16
Demonstrations
  • Demonstrations are assemblies.
  • Demonstrations on public property cannot be
    stopped because the government or local community
    does not like the message.
  • Demonstrations are required to get permits.
  • Demonstrators do not have rights to protest on
    private property.
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