Introduction to ECE - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


Title: Introduction to ECE


1
Introduction to ECE
  • Historical Perspective
  • ET-ECE-5 Examine the theories of human
    development.

2
STANDARDS
  • ET-ECE-1 Demonstrate employability skills
    required by business and industry.
  • The following elements will be introduced and
    integrated throughout the content of this course.
  • 1.1 Communicate effectively through writing,
    speaking, listening, reading, and interpersonal
    abilities.
  • 1.2 Demonstrate creativity with multiple
    approaches to ask challenging questions resulting
    in innovative procedures, methods, and products.
  • 1.3 Exhibit critical thinking and problem
    solving skills to locate, analyze, and apply
    information in career planning and employment
    situations.
  • 1.4 Model work readiness traits required for
    success in the workplace including integrity,
    honesty, accountability, punctuality, time
    management, and respect for diversity.
  • 1.5 Apply the appropriate skill sets to be
    productive in a changing, technological, and
    diverse workplace to be able to work
    independently, interpret data, and apply team
    work skills.
  • 1.6 Present a professional image through
    appearance, behavior, and language.

3
GPS Focus Standards
  • GPS Academic Standards
  • ELA9-12W1, ELA9-12W3, ELA9-12LSV1, ELA9-12LSV2,
    ELA9-12RC1
  • ET-ECE-5 Examine the theories of human
    development.
  • 5.1 Describe how major theories of human
    development provide a basis for planning an
    environment and activities that are
    developmentally appropriate.
  • 5.2 Research and explain human development
    theories cognitive, psychosocial,
    psychoanalytical, and behaviorist.
  • 5.3 Analyze the impact of heredity and
    environment on the developing child.
  • 5.4 Investigate major child development theorist
    and theory contributions to the field of early
    childhood education.
  • 5.5 Discuss the impact of human development
    theories on the evolution of early childhood care
    and learning.
  • EDU-FS-8 Leadership and Teamwork
  • Learners apply leadership and teamwork skills in
    collaborating with others to accomplish
    organizational goals and objectives.

4
UNDERSTANDINGS GOALS
  • I Can Statements
  • Understand the value of children and their
    contribution to the future.
  • Determine the role of heredity and environment
    across the lifespan.
  • Analyze the effects of heredity and environment.
  • Describe how major theories of human development
    shape our view of young children and impact the
    structure of early childhood programs..
  • Essential Questions
  • How do children contribute to our future?
  • How were children valued in the past?
  • How has the education of children changed over
    time?
  • Who were the people who shaped our view of young
    children?
  • Have their views been supported by research and
    how have their views impacted early childhood
    programs in existence today?
  • Which is most influential, heredity or
    environment?

5
OPENING- BELL RINGER
  • Whats In Your Bag? Presentations
  • Dont forget permission slips are due for Field
    Experience by Thursday in order for you to be
    able to go!!!!
  • -Tuesday will be make-up detention for ALL
    missing assignments (ensure that it is made up
    today to avoid detention!!!!)
  • -Thursday will be the make-up day for ALL missed
    field experiences
  • Please ensure that your sourcebook is organized
    properly
  • Cover Page
  • Name
  • Period
  • 2014-2015
  • Intro to ECE
  • Table of Contents
  • (2 pages- front only)
  • Section 1- Notes
  • Section 2- Bell Ringers
  • Section 3- Observation Journal
  • Each section should be 30 pages apart

6
OPENING- BELL RINGER
All videos should be posted to Edmodo at this
point!! You must post comments to two videos
by TODAY!! Your post should include the
following -What is your overall opinion of the
video?-How could this particular family stressor
impact the student (academically, socially,
behaviorally, etc.)?-What could the teacher do
if it is determined that a student is dealing
with this particular family stressor and family
members are not aware of the impact that it has
on the child?
  • Please ensure that your sourcebook is organized
    properly
  • Cover Page
  • Name
  • Period
  • 2014-2015
  • Intro to ECE
  • Table of Contents
  • (2 pages- front only)
  • Section 1- Notes
  • Section 2- Bell Ringers
  • Section 3- Observation Journal
  • Each section should be 30 pages apart

7
OPENING- BELL RINGER
  • LAWRENCE KOHLBERG
  • Being a close follower of Jean Piagets theory of
    cognitive development, Kohlberg's work reflects
    and extends the work of his predecessor. He is
    famous for his work in moral development and
    education. His theory of moral development
    involved a series of stages, which he believed
    children must pass through in a fixed order.
    Kohlberg believed that progress from one stage to
    the next was based on social interactionopportuni
    ties to experience and reflect on situations
    involving moral decisions.
  • Therefore, he reasoned, participating in moral
    discussions with others, especially those at a
    higher level of moral reasoning, should lead to
    increased maturity in moral
  • judgment.
  • WHAT IS HIS CLAIM (THEORY)?

WARRANT WORKOUT Name(s) ___________________
________ Theorist
___________________________ Theorist Claim
___________________________ ______________________
_____ Supporting quotation or evidence _________
__________________ ___________________________ ___
________________________ Source
___________________________ ______________________
_____
8
OPENING- BELL RINGER
  • ABRAHAM MASLOW
  • WHAT IS HIS CLAIM (THEORY)?

WARRANT WORKOUT Name(s) ___________________
________ Theorist
___________________________ Theorist Claim
___________________________ ______________________
_____ Supporting quotation or evidence _________
__________________ ___________________________ ___
________________________ Source
___________________________ ______________________
_____
9
OPENING- BELL RINGER
  • ABRAHAM MASLOW

WARRANT WORKOUT Name(s) ___________________
________ Theorist
___________________________ Theorist Claim
___________________________ ______________________
_____ Supporting quotation or evidence _________
__________________ ___________________________ ___
________________________ Source
___________________________ ______________________
_____
10
OPENING- BELL RINGER
  • "Give me a dozen healthy infants, well-formed,
    and my own specified world to bring them up in
    and I'll guarantee to take any one at random and
    train him to become any type of specialist I
    might select -- doctor, lawyer, artist,
    merchant-chief and, yes, even beggar-man and
    thief, regardless of his talents, penchants,
    tendencies, abilities, vocations, and race of his
    ancestors."--John Watson, Behaviorism, 1930 What
    exactly did John Watson mean in the quote?
  • What is a behavior? Do you believe that behavior
    is defined more by heredity, environment or both?
    Why?
  • Please ensure that your sourcebook is organized
    properly
  • Cover Page
  • Name
  • Period
  • 2013-2014
  • Intro to ECE
  • Table of Contents
  • (2 pages- front only)
  • Section 1- Notes
  • Section 2- Bell Ringers
  • Section 3- Observation Journal

11
OPENING- BELL RINGER
  • Eriksons Hoedown
  • http//www.cteonline.org/portal/default/Curriculum
    /Viewer/Curriculum?action2cmobjid401088viewvi
    ewerrefcmobjid380348
  • Please ensure that your sourcebook is organized
    properly
  • Cover Page
  • Name
  • Period
  • 2013-2014
  • Intro to ECE
  • Table of Contents
  • (2 pages- front only)
  • Section 1- Notes
  • Section 2- Bell Ringers
  • Section 3- Observation Journal

Using the Chart and Scenarios provided, gather an
understanding of Eriksons stages and apply it to
the situation that you are given. Write your
response in your Sourcebook and be prepared to
have at least one person share your groups input.
12
OPENING- BELL RINGER
  • How have you and will you progress through each
    stage of Eriksons Psychological Stages?
  • How did you learn to trust/mistrust?
  • How did you develop feelings of confidence/lack
    of confidence?
  • Were/Are you a self-starter?
  • Do you feel sure of yourself? How did you learn
    to be?
  • Do you know who you will become?
  • Are you committed to love?
  • Are you concerned about your family and
    community?
  • Are you happy with your life at the moment?

13
OPENING/
WORK PERIOD
  • COMPLETE MISSING ASSIGNMENTS
  • ENSURE THAT SOURCEBOOKS ARE ORGANIZED (END OF
    NINE WEEKS APPROACHING!!)
  • Go to Edmodo
  • Click on the link for the Observation Journal 1
  • Use this form to type your journal entry and
    submit through the correct period
  • Save as Name-Course-Observation Journal
  • DUE ON YESTERDAY!!
  • Please ensure that your sourcebook is organized
    properly
  • Cover Page
  • Name
  • Period
  • 2014-2015
  • Intro to ECE
  • Table of Contents
  • (2 pages- front only)
  • Section 1- Notes
  • Section 2- Bell Ringers
  • Section 3- Observation Journal
  • Particulars
  • Theorist Name/Picture
  • Birth/Death/Birthplace
  • Educational Training (as it pertains to their
    theory)
  • Summary of Theory
  • Year the theory was introduced
  • Details of the Theory
  • How the Theory was proven
  • How the Theory impacted education

14
ARTICLE DAY- CHALK TALK RULES
  • Chalk Talk is a way to share your insights,
    perceptions and observations.
  • Most important rulethe class must remain
    absolutely silent. There is no speaking,
    responding, grunting, sighing. Basically, no
    noise making of any kind.
  • When the Chalk Talk begins, you are asked to
    respond to the questions or statements written on
    the chalk paper. You may respond using one-word
    answers, phrases, or questions. If students want
    to respond to something someone else has written
    they may draw a line from that response to their
    response. The end result will look like a giant
    web.

15
Theorist Chalk Talk
  • Lawrence Kohlberg
  • Jean Piaget
  • Abraham Maslow
  • Rudolph Steiner
  • Sigmund Freud
  • B. F. Skinner
  • Erik Erikson
  • John Locke

16
WORK PERIOD- Standard 5 (Historical Perspective-
Theorist)
  • Define vocabulary terms
  • Answer the following questions
  • Describe the three areas of development.
  • Describe the two areas of physical development.
  • List and explain the three principles of
    development.
  • List Eriksons eight psychosocial stages of
    development.
  • Describe the steps in Piagets Cognitive
    Development Theory.
  • Describe Piagets Stages of Development.
  • Describe Kohlbergs Six Stages of Moral
    Development.
  • Name the five levels of Maslows Hierarchy of
    Human Needs.
  • Name the eight areas identified in Gardners
    Multiple Intelligences Theory.
  • What is the difference between heredity and
    environment?
  • Identify the research of the child development
    theorist. Name the theorist and identify their
    theory.

17
WORK PERIOD- Family Stressor Video, Whats In
Your Bag, Sourcebook Notes
  • FAMILY STRESSOR VIDEO
  • All videos must be re-posted to Edmodo if the
    file does not end in wvm
  • Save as Name(s)-Video Title-Course/Period
  • You must post comments to two videos by
    WEDNESDAY!!
  • WHATS IN YOUR BAG?
  • Baggage to carry and drag you down or luggage
    to take you places and make you a strong person.
    While studying heredity/environment, you will
    discover what makes YOU who YOU are. You will
    decorate the outside of a paper bag or some other
    container with descriptions of traits that you
    inherit from others (heredity) or characteristics
    that are a part of your surroundings
    (environment). Fill the inside of bag/container
    with _5_ objects representing heredity and _5_
    objects symbolizing childhood environment.
  • PLEASE TURN IN IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY DONE SO.
  • Standard 5
  • (Historical Perspective- Theorist)
  • Define vocabulary terms
  • Answer the following questions
  • How do major theories of human development
    provide a basis for planning an environment and
    activities that are developmentally appropriate?
  • Describe the four human development theories
    cognitive, psychosocial, psychoanalytic, and
    behaviorist.
  • Outline Eriksons eight psychosocial stages of
    development.
  • What is the difference between the conscious and
    unconscious mind?
  • What is the difference between classical and
    operant conditioning?
  • What is the difference between heredity and
    environment?
  • Identify the research of the child development
    theorist.
  • DO NOT FORGET YOUR ECE FIELD EXPERIENCE
    PERMISSION SLIP

18
WORK PERIOD- Observation Journal, Sourcebook
Notes, Whats In Your Bag
  • OBSERVATION JOURNAL
  • Go to Edmodo
  • Click on the link for the Observation Journal
    Assignment- Historical Perspective
  • Use this form to type your journal entry and
    submit through the correct period
  • Save as Name-Period-Observation 2
  • Standard 3
  • (Historical Perspective- Theorist)
  • Define vocabulary terms
  • Answer the following questions
  • How do major theories of human development
    provide a basis for planning an environment and
    activities that are developmentally appropriate?
  • Describe the four human development theories
    cognitive, psychosocial, psychoanalytic, and
    behaviorist.
  • Outline Eriksons eight psychosocial stages of
    development.
  • What is the difference between the conscious and
    unconscious mind?
  • What is the difference between classical and
    operant conditioning?
  • What is the difference between heredity and
    environment?
  • Identify the research of the child development
    theorist.
  • DO NOT FORGET YOUR ECE FIELD EXPERIENCE
    PERMISSION SLIP

Make up missing assignments
19
Standard 3-Historical PerspectiveVocabulary
Terms
  • Windows of opportunity
  • Theory
  • Schemata
  • Multiple intelligences
  • Psychosocial
  • Psychoanalytical
  • Behaviorist
  • Development
  • Infant
  • Toddler
  • Preschooler
  • Maturation
  • Neurons
  • Synapses

20
Historical PerspectiveVocabulary Terms
  • Development- Change or growth in a human being
  • Maturation- Sequence of biological changes in a
    child giving the child new abilities
  • Neurons- Specialized nerve cells
  • Synapses-Connections between nerve cells that
    pass messages in the brain
  • Windows of opportunity- Specific spans of time
    for normal development of certain skills
  • Theory- A principle or idea that is proposed,
    researched, and generally accepted as an
    explanation
  • Schemata- Mental representations or concepts
  • Psychosocial- personality develops in a series of
    stages
  • Psychoanalytical- The Conscious and Unconscious
    Mind
  • Behaviorist- theory of learning based upon the
    idea that all behaviors are acquired through
    conditioning
  • Infant-Child from birth through the first year of
    life
  • Toddler-Children from the first year until the
    third birthday
  • Preschooler- Children ages three to six years
  • Multiple intelligences- Emphasizes different
    kinds of intelligences used by the human brain

21
Child DevelopmentAreas of Development
  • Physical Development- Physical body changes
  • Gross-Motor Development
  • Improvement of skills using the large muscles in
    the legs and arms (running, skipping, etc.)
  • Fine Motor Development
  • Involves the small muscles of the hands and
    fingers (grasping, cutting, drawing, etc.)
  • Cognitive (Intellectual) Development- Refers to
    processes people use to gain knowledge (Language,
    thought, reasoning, imagination)
  • Social-Emotional Development- Learning to relate
    to others through feelings and expression of
    feelings.

22
Principles of Development
  • Development proceeds from the head downward
    (cephalocaudal principle).
  • Development proceeds from the center of the body
    outward (proximodistal principle).
  • Development depends on maturation.

23
Investigate the impact of heredity and
environment on the developing child.
  • Environment- The circumstances or conditions that
    surround one surroundings.
  • The totality of circumstances surrounding an
    organism or group of organisms, especially
  • The combination of external physical conditions
    that affect and influence the growth,
    development, and survival of organisms "We shall
    never understand the natural environment until we
    see it as a living organism" (Paul Brooks).
  • The complex of social and cultural conditions
    affecting the nature of an individual or
    community.
  • Heredity is the passing of traits to offspring
    (from its parent or ancestors). This is the
    process by which an offspring cell or organism
    acquires or becomes predisposed to the
    characteristics of its parent cell or organism.

Heredity and Environment worksheet
24
Children Learn What They Live
  • If children live with criticism, They learn to
    condemn
  • If children live with hostility, They learn to
    fight
  • If children live with ridicule, They learn to be
    shy
  • If children live with shame, They learn to feel
    guilty.
  • If children live with encouragement, They learn
    confidence.
  • If children live with tolerance, They learn to be
    patient
  • If children live with praise, They learn to
    appreciate.
  • If children live with acceptance, They learn to
    love.
  • If children live with approval, They learn to
    like themselves.
  • If children live with honesty, They learn
    truthfulness.
  • If children live with security, They learn to
    have faith in themselves and others.
  • If children live with friendliness, They learn
    the world is a nice place in which to live.
  • What are your thoughts about this poem?

25
Children Learn What They Live
  • REMINDERS
  • Do not forget to turn in permission slips for ECE
    Field Experience
  • Complete and turn in Substitute Work (Textbook
    pages)/ Complete Fridays article
  • Complete ALL missing work (Family Stressor Video,
    Whats In Your Bag, Standard 4 Notes, etc.
  • If children live with criticism,
    They learn to condemn
  • If children live with hostility,    
    They learn to fight
  • If children live with ridicule,              
    They learn to be shy
  • If children live with shame,               They
    learn to feel guilty.
  • If children live with encouragement,
  • They learn confidence.
  • If children live with tolerance,              
    They learn to be patient
  • If children live with praise,               They
    learn to appreciate.
  • If children live with acceptance,              
    They learn to love.
  • If children live with approval,              
    They learn to like themselves.
  • If children live with honesty,              
    They learn truthfulness.
  • If children live with security,              
    They learn to have faith in
    themselves and others.
  • If children live with friendliness,            
      They learn the world is a nice place
    in which to live.
  • You will create a poster using the lines from the
    poem. 
  • You will find at least five pictures, using
    pictures cut from magazines that illustrates the
    intent of the poem. 
  • Cut and glue the pictures to a piece of
    construction to create a collage. 
  • The stanzas need to be referenced and identified
    within the collage of appropriate pictures.
  • Title the poster, "Chldren Learn What They
    Live".
  • You will identify, through writing, why you chose
    the pictures that you did.  You will need
    to share your rationale for each visual
    depiction.  This should be done on a separate
    sheet of paper and attach it to the poster.

26
WHATS IN YOUR BAG? ET-ECE-5 Examine the
theories of human development. Analyze
the impact of heredity and environment on the
developing child. 
  • Baggage to carry and drag you down or luggage
    to take you places and
  • make you a strong person. While studying
    heredity/environment, you will
  • discover what makes YOU who YOU are. You will
    decorate the outside of a
  • paper bag or some other container with
    descriptions of traits that you inherit
  • from others (heredity) or characteristics that
    are a part of your surroundings
  • (environment). Fill the inside of bag/container
    with _5_ objects representing
  • heredity and _5_ objects symbolizing childhood
    environment.
  • Present YOURSELF to the class.
  • ____ Objects Evident (60 Points)
  • Heredity _____ _____ _____
    _____ _____
  • Environment _____ _____ _____
    _____ _____
  • _____Description (15Points)
  • _____Presentation (15 Points)
  • _____Timeliness (10 Points)
  •  
  • All presentations must be completed by
    Wednesday, February 19th (Bags will be presented
    daily during Bell Ringer. Any bags that are not
    presented will still need to be submitted but
    will lose presentation and timeliness points)

27
WHATS IN YOUR BAG?
  • HEREDITY
  • Skin color- combination of both parents (mother
    light skin/ father dark skin) (liquid make-up)
  • Lips- mother has full lips (candy shaped like
    lips)
  • Height- both parents are short (ruler)
  • Organizational Skills- father did not like
    clutter/ mother believed in getting things done
    in a timely manner (planner)
  • Eyes- both parents have brown eyes (brown
    eye-liner)
  • ENVIRONMENT
  • God- mother ensured that we attended church,
    studied the bible (mini-bible)
  • Alcohol- father drank heavily (bottle top)
  • Education- neither parents graduated from high
    school but both urged my brother I to do so
    (teaching certificate/ Army memorabilia)
  • Reading- mother read the bible constantly-encourag
    ed me to read (book)
  • Family- took vacations, did activities as a
    family (family picture)

28
Major Child Development Theorist
  • Jean Piaget
  • Lawrence Kohlberg
  • Erik Erikson
  • Alfred Binet
  • Urie Bronfenbrenner
  • Benjamin Bloom
  • Maria Montessori
  • Sigmund Freud
  • Lev Vygotsky
  • Rudolph Dreikurs
  • John Dewey
  • B.F. Skinner
  • Anna Freud
  • Abraham Maslow
  • John Amos Comenius
  • John Locke
  • Jean Jacques Rousseau
  • Johann Pestalozzi
  • Fredrich Froebel
  • Rudolf Steiner
  • Patty Smith Hill
  • Lucy Sprague Mitchell
  • Abigail Eliot
  • Arnold Gesell
  • Bejamin Spock
  • T. Berry Brazelton
  • Margaret McMillan
  • Susan Isaacs
  • Loris Malaguzzi
  • Howard Gardner

29
Major Child Development Theorist
  • Jean Piaget- Childrens intellectual development
    proceeds through stages, as they adapt to the
    physical environment
  • Lawrence Kohlberg- Childrens moral development
    begins with a desire to avoid punishment and
    proceeds to the development of ethical principles
  • Erik Erikson- Personality develops according to
    how a person responds to psychological crises at
    certain stages of life
  • Alfred Binet- Inventor of the first usable
    intelligence test, today's IQ tests
  • Urie Bronfenbrenner- Ecological Systems Theory,
    and as a co-founder of the Head Start program in
    the United States for disadvantaged pre-school
    children
  • Benjamin Bloom- Taxonomy of Educational
    Objectives in the cognitive domain
  • Maria Montessori- Established the use of child
    sized furniture observed that children were
    bored, not unruly
  • Sigmund Freud- Considered the father of
    psychology
  • Lev Vygotsky- Believed in the Zone of Proximal
    Development
  • Rudolph Dreikurs- suggested that human
    misbehavior is the result of feeling a lack of
    belonging to one's social group child acts from
    one of four "mistaken goals" undue attention,
    power, revenge or avoidance (inadequacy).
  • John Dewey- Supported a child centered approach
    where children learn by doing. children should
    be able to explore the world around them. also
    encouraged the development of critical-thinking
    and problem-solving skills.
  • B.F. Skinner- Social developmentalist coined the
    term, operant conditioning
  • Anna Freud- Founder of child psychoanalysis
  • Abraham Maslow- Hierarchy of Human Needs
  • John Amos Comenius- father of modern education.

30
Major Child Development Theorist
  • John Locke- Founder of educational philosophy
    argues that the newborns mind is a blank slate
    Believed in the importance of nurture over
    nature.
  • Jean Jacques Rousseau- Believed that children are
    born naturally good Children can be corrupted by
    parents and/or society
  • Johann Pestalozzi- Believed that all children are
    capable of learning and activities should focus
    on the manipulation of objects.
  • Fredrich Froebel- Founder of kindergarten
    Promoted the value of play
  • Rudolf Steiner- founded a new spiritual movement,
    Anthroposophy
  • Patty Smith Hill- one of the leaders of the
    Kindergarten Movement in the US Founded the
    National Association for the Education of Young
    Children (NAEYC).
  • Lucy Sprague Mitchell- building experimental
    schools and as a researcher who carefully studied
    children's language-learning patterns
  • Abigail Eliot- pioneer of the nursery school
    movement
  • Arnold Gesell- Established the normative theory
    Believed children will develop according to how
    nature made them reach developmental milestones
    in sequence.
  • Bejamin Spock- first pediatrician to study
    psychoanalysis to try to understand children's
    needs and family dynamics
  • T. Berry Brazelton- a noted pediatrician and
    author in the United States. Major hospitals
    throughout the world use the Brazelton Neonatal
    Behavioral Assessment Scale (NBAS).
  • Margaret McMillan Childs overall welfare was
    the focus believe that teachers have an
    influence on a childs brain development during
    this formative time.
  • Susan Isaacs- published studies on the
    intellectual and social development of children
    and promoted the nursery school movement
  • Loris Malaguzzi- Developed Reggio Emilia School-
    Emphasizes the importance of creating authentic
    learning environments. Focuses on projects that
    allow a child to explore a personally meaningful
    concept or theme.
  • Howard Gardner- Theory of Multiple Intelligences.

31
THEORIST PRESENTATION
  • Particulars
  • Theorist Name/Picture
  • Birth/Death/Birthplace
  • Educational Training (as it pertains to their
    theory)
  • Summary of Theory
  • Year the theory was introduced
  • Details of the Theory
  • How the Theory was proven
  • How the Theory impacted education
  • See Sample Poster- Lawrence Kohlberg

32
THEORIST RESEARCH GUIDEIECE 3 Students will
identify major contributors to the field of early
childhood care and education and analyze their
implications for educational and childcare
practices.
  • Theorist Name ____________________________________
    _____
  • Birth _______________ Death _________
    Birthplace ___________
  • Educational Training
  • Details regarding their early education/life
  • Details regarding their education later in life
  • How did events that took place early in their
    life impact them?
  • Summary of Theory
  • What does your theorist believe (exact words)?
  • What does your theorist believe (your
    interpretation)?
  • What prompted their belief?
  • How the Theory was Proven
  • What method was used to research their belief?
  • (observation, interviews, research, readings,
    etc.)
  • Provide details about this method
  • How the Theory Impacted Education

33
TEÓRICO PRESENTACIÓN
  • DatosTeórico Nombre / ImagenNacimiento / Muerte
    / Lugar de nacimientoCapacitación Educativa (en
    lo que respecta a su teoría)
  • Resumen de la TeoríaAño de la teoría fue
    introducidaLos detalles de la Teoría
  • Cómo la teoría se comprobóCómo impactó la
    Teoría de la educación

34
THEORIST PRESENTATION
Compile information using the following www.prezi
.com www.glogster.com (7HCF1F)
  • Edmodo Submission
  • Prezi
  • Save and exit presentation
  • Click Share
  • Dialogue box will open
  • Copy Link
  • Go to Edmodo
  • Click Turn In (Theorist Presentation)
  • Click on Link symbol and paste
  • Click on Turn in Assignment
  • Particulars
  • Theorist Name/Picture
  • Birth/Death/Birthplace
  • Educational Training (as it pertains to their
    theory)
  • Summary of Theory
  • How the Theory was proven
  • How the Theory impacted education
  • Jean Piaget
  • Alfred Binet
  • Urie Bronfenbrenner
  • Maria Montessori
  • Lev Vygotsky
  • Rudolph Dreikurs
  • Haim Ginott
  • Anna Freud
  • John Amos Comenius
  • John Locke
  • Jean Jacques Rousseau
  • Johann Pestalozzi
  • Fredrich Froebel
  • Rudolf Steiner
  • Patty Smith Hill
  • Lucy Sprague Mitchell
  • Abigail Eliot
  • Arnold Gesell
  • Bejamin Spock
  • T. Berry Brazelton
  • McMillan Sisters
  • Susan Isaacs
  • Loris Malaguzzi

Sample Student Work http//prezi.com/yf5ceexnebux/
sigmund-freud/
35
THEORIST PRESENTATION
Compile information using the following
www.animoto.com or www.onetruemedia.com
  • Jean Piaget
  • Alfred Binet
  • Urie Bronfenbrenner
  • Maria Montessori
  • Lev Vygotsky
  • Rudolph Dreikurs
  • Haim Ginott
  • Anna Freud
  • John Amos Comenius
  • John Locke
  • Jean Jacques Rousseau
  • Johann Pestalozzi
  • Fredrich Froebel
  • Rudolf Steiner
  • Patty Smith Hill
  • Lucy Sprague Mitchell
  • Abigail Eliot
  • Arnold Gesell
  • Bejamin Spock
  • Particulars
  • Theorist Name/Picture
  • Birth/Death/Birthplace
  • Educational Training (as it pertains to their
    theory)
  • Summary of Theory
  • How the Theory was proven
  • How the Theory impacted education
  • Due by Thursday, February 20, 2014
  • WHATS IN YOUR BAG?
  • STILL DUE!!!

36
THEORIST PRESENTATION
Compile information using the following www.prezi
.com www.glogster.com (7HCF1F)
  • Edmodo Submission
  • Prezi
  • Save and exit presentation
  • Click Share
  • Dialogue box will open
  • Copy Link
  • Go to Edmodo
  • Click Turn In (Theorist Presentation)
  • Click on Link symbol and paste
  • Click on Turn in Assignment
  • DUE TODAY!!

THEORIST CHALK TALK _at_ 1100 A.M.
  • Particulars
  • Theorist Name/Picture
  • Birth/Death/Birthplace
  • Educational Training (as it pertains to their
    theory)
  • Summary of Theory
  • How the Theory was proven
  • How the Theory impacted education
  • Fredrich Froebel
  • Rudolf Steiner
  • Patty Smith Hill
  • Lucy Sprague Mitchell
  • Abigail Eliot
  • Arnold Gesell
  • Bejamin Spock
  • T. Berry Brazelton
  • McMillan Sisters
  • Susan Isaacs
  • Loris Malaguzzi
  • Jean Piaget
  • Alfred Binet
  • Urie Bronfenbrenner
  • Maria Montessori
  • Lev Vygotsky
  • Rudolph Dreikurs
  • Haim Ginott
  • Anna Freud
  • John Amos Comenius
  • John Locke
  • Jean Jacques Rousseau
  • Johann Pestalozzi

THEORIST PRESENTATION EVALUATION
37
ABRAHAM MASLOW 1908-1970
38
HIERARCHY OF HUMAN NEEDS
  • The physiological needs.  These include the needs
    we have for oxygen, water, protein, salt, sugar,
    calcium, and other minerals and vitamins.  They
    also include the need to maintain a pH balance
    (getting too acidic or base will kill you) and
    temperature (98.6 or near to it).  Also, theres
    the needs to be active, to rest, to sleep, to get
    rid of wastes (CO2,  sweat, urine, and feces), to
    avoid pain, and to have sex.  Quite a collection!
  • The safety and security needs.  When the
    physiological needs are largely taken care of,
    this second layer of needs comes into play.  You
    will become increasingly interested in finding
    safe circumstances, stability, protection.  You
    might develop a need for structure, for order,
    some limits.
  • The love and belonging needs.  When physiological
    needs and safety needs are, by and large, taken
    care of, a third layer starts to show up.  You
    begin to feel the need for friends, a sweetheart,
    children, affectionate relationships in general,
    even a sense of community.  Looked at negatively,
    you become increasing susceptible to loneliness
    and social anxieties.
  • The esteem needs.  Next, we begin to look for a
    little self-esteem.  Maslow noted two versions of
    esteem needs, a lower one and a higher one.  The
    lower one is the need for the respect of others,
    the need for status, fame, glory, recognition,
    attention, reputation, appreciation, dignity,
    even dominance.  The higher form involves the
    need for self-respect, including such feelings as
    confidence, competence, achievement, mastery,
    independence, and freedom.  Note that this is the
    higher form because, unlike the respect of
    others, once you have self-respect, its a lot
    harder to lose!

Deficit needs, or D-needs.  If you dont have
enough of something -- i.e. you have a deficit --
you feel the need. 
Homeostasis. Your body, when it lacks a certain
substance, develops a hunger for it.
39
Self-Actualization
  • The last level is called growth motivation (in
    contrast to deficit motivation), being needs (or
    B-needs, in contrast to D-needs), and
    self-actualization. These people were
    reality-centered, which means they could
    differentiate what is fake and dishonest from
    what is real and genuine.  They were
    problem-centered, meaning they treated lifes
    difficulties as problems demanding solutions, not
    as personal troubles to be railed at or
    surrendered to.  And they had a different
    perception of means and ends.  If you want to be
    truly self-actualizing, you need to have your
    lower needs taken care of, at least to a
    considerable extent. 
  • The self-actualizers also had a different way of
    relating to others.  First, they had a need for
    privacy, and were comfortable being alone.  They
    were relatively independent of culture and
    environment, relying instead on their own
    experiences and judgments.  And they resisted
    enculturation, that is, they were not susceptible
    to social pressure -- they were, in fact,
    nonconformists in the best sense.
  • Further, they had what Maslow called democratic
    values, meaning that they were open to ethnic and
    individual variety, even treasuring it.  They had
    the quality called Gemeinschaftsgefühl -- social
    interest, compassion, humanity.  And they enjoyed
    intimate personal relations with a few close
    friends and family members, rather than more
    shallow relationships with many people.
  • They had an unhostile sense of humor --
    preferring to joke at their own expense, or at
    the human condition, and never directing their
    humor at others.  They had a quality he called
    acceptance of self and others, by which he meant
    that these people would be more likely to take
    you as you are than try to change you into what
    they thought you should be.  This same acceptance
    applied to their attitudes towards themselves 
    If some quality of theirs wasnt harmful, they
    let it be, even enjoying it as a personal quirk. 
    Along with this comes spontaneity and
    simplicity  They preferred being themselves
    rather than being pretentious or artificial.  In
    fact, for all their nonconformity, he found that
    they tended to be conventional on the surface,
    just where less self-actualizing nonconformists
    tend to be the most dramatic.
  • And these people had a certain freshness of
    appreciation, an ability to see things, even
    ordinary things, with wonder.  Along with this
    comes their ability to be creative, inventive,
    and original.  And, finally, these people tended
    to have more peak experiences than the average
    person.  A peak experience is one that takes you
    out of yourself, that makes you feel very tiny,
    or very large, to some extent one with life or
    nature or God.  It gives you a feeling of being a
    part of the infinite and the eternal.  These
    experiences tend to leave their mark on a person,
    change them for the better, and many people
    actively seek them out.  They are also called
    mystical experiences, and are an important part
    of many religious and philosophical traditions.

40
Erik Erikson
1902 - 1994
  • His theory states
  • Eight Stages of Development
  • Stage 1 - Trust vs. Mistrust
  • Stage 2 - Autonomy vs. Shame and Doubt
  • Stage 3 - Initiative vs. Guilt
  • Stage 4 - Industry vs. Inferiority
  • Stage 5 - Identity vs. Confusion
  • Stage 6 - Intimacy vs. Isolation
  • Stage 7 - Generativity vs. Stagnation
  • Stage 8 - Integrity vs. Despair

41
ERICKSONS PSYCHOSOCIAL STAGES
Erikson believed people experience a conflict
that serves as a turning point in development. In
Eriksons view, these conflicts are centered on
either developing a psychological quality or
failing to develop that quality. During these
times, the potential for personal growth is high,
but so is the potential for failure.
42
Erikson Scenarios
  • Stage 1 In Singapore, some parents are leaving
    their babies in a 24 hour stay in center full
    time for weeks or months the babies are looked
    after by trained nannies that are rotated after 3
    weeks to prevent babies from becoming too
    attached to one person. What are some possible
    reasons the center does not want a baby to be
    attached to one person? Do you think it is good
    to prevent attachment? If yes why? If no why?
  • Stage 2 Toddlers are beginning to recognize they
    are separate people with their own desires and
    activities. Caregivers should provide many
    opportunities for toddlers to make choices. Some
    caregivers, in an attempt to comfort a toddler
    after a fall or something say Naughty floor, you
    made Johnny fall! What is the toddler learning
    from the adults response? Identify two
    statements caregivers can make to teach industry.
  • Stage 3 Imaginative play is a basic activity of
    this stage. Preschoolers explore and reenact
    different roles and activities daily. In light of
    this knowledge, what are your views about
    children acting out television characters? Give
    reasons. Does the violence influence children?
    Why or Why not? Give reasons for your answer.
  • Stage 4 School Age A lot of emphasis an age is
    based in academic performance. Children who can
    not master their work may consider themselves a
    failure. AS a teacher how can you accept Childs
    efforts without placing value judgments on what
    is accomplished? How can you limit feelings of
    inferiority?

43
Jean Piaget
1896 - 1980
  • Cognitive Development Theory
  • Schemata-mental representations or concepts.
  • Adaptation- mentally organizing what is perceived
    in the environment.
  • Assimilation-taking in new information and adding
    it to what the child already knows.
  • Accommodation- Adjusting what is already known to
    fit the new information.

44
Jean Piaget
1896 - 1980
  • Stages of Development
  • Sensorimotor Stage (birth to two)- infants use
    all their senses to explore and learn.
  • Preoperational Stage (two to seven)- children are
    egocentric assume others see the world the same
    way they do.
  • Concrete Operations Stage (seven to eleven)-
    children develop the capacity to think
    systematically, only when they can refer to
    actual objects and use hands-on activities.

45
B.F. Skinner
1904 - 1990
  • His theory
  • Based on operant conditioning.  The
    organism is in the process of operating on the
    environment, which in ordinary terms means it is
    bouncing around its world, doing what it does. 
    During this operating, the organism encounters
    a special kind of stimulus, called a reinforcing
    stimulus, or simply a reinforcer.  This special
    stimulus has the effect of increasing the operant
    -- that is, the behavior occurring just before
    the reinforcer.  This is operant conditioning 
    the behavior is followed by a consequence, and
    the nature of the consequence modifies the
    organisms tendency to repeat the behavior in the
    future.
  • One example of this is

Imagine a rat in a cage. This is a special cage
(called, in fact, a Skinner box) that has a bar
or pedal on one wall that, when pressed, causes a
little mechanism to release a foot pellet into
the cage.  The rat is bouncing around the cage,
doing whatever it is rats do, when he
accidentally presses the bar and -- hey, presto!
-- a food pellet falls into the cage! The operant
is the behavior just prior to the reinforcer,
which is the food pellet, of course.  In no time
at all, the rat is furiously peddling away at the
bar, hoarding his pile of pellets in the corner
of the cage. A behavior followed by a
reinforcing stimulus results in an increased
probability of that behavior occurring in the
future. What if you dont give the rat any more
pellets?  Apparently, hes no fool, and after a
few futile attempts, he stops his bar-pressing
behavior.  This is called extinction of the
operant behavior.
46
Research and explain human development theories
cognitive, psychosocial, psychoanalytic, and
behaviorist.
  • Pschoanalytic- The Conscious and Unconscious Mind
  • The Structure of the Conscious and Unconscious
    Mind According to Freud
  • The conscious mind includes everything that we
    are aware of. This is the aspect of our mental
    processing that we can think and talk about
    rationally. A part of this includes our memory,
    which is not always part of consciousness but can
    be retrieved easily at any time and brought into
    our awareness. Freud called this ordinary memory
    the preconscious.
  • The unconscious mind is a reservoir of feelings,
    thoughts, urges, and memories that outside of our
    conscious awareness. Most of the contents of the
    unconscious are unacceptable or unpleasant, such
    as feelings of pain, anxiety, or conflict.
    According to Freud, the unconscious continues to
    influence our behavior and experience, even
    though we are unaware of these underlying
    influences.
  • Behaviorist- a theory of learning based upon the
    idea that all behaviors are acquired through
    conditioning.
  • Classical conditioning is a technique used in
    behavioral training in which a naturally
    occurring stimulus is paired with a response.
    Next, a previously neutral stimulus is paired
    with the naturally occurring stimulus.
    Eventually, the previously neutral stimulus comes
    to evoke the response without the presence of the
    naturally occurring stimulus. The two elements
    are then known as the conditioned stimulus and
    the conditioned response.
  • Operant conditioning Operant conditioning
    (sometimes referred to as instrumental
    conditioning) is a method of learning that occurs
    through rewards and punishments for behavior.
    Through operant conditioning, an association is
    made between a behavior and a consequence for
    that behavior.

47
Lawrence Kohlberg Theory is based upon how
children develop morally.
  • Preconventional children begin life with no
    sense of right or wrong. However, children learn
    quickly that certain behaviors are punished and
    other behaviors are rewarded. Therefore, they
    avoid behaviors that are punished and strive for
    behavior or acts that are rewarded.
  • Conventional At approximately age 9, children
    learn to behave according to a sense of what
    others need or want. They will follow rules that
    have been established and respect authority. The
    children are now acting in regards to right and
    wrong. Basically, children have learned the
    typical or conventional ways of acting based upon
    what is right and what is wrong.
  • Post Conventional around the age of 16,
    individuals mature morally. They respect human
    rights and develop individual principles to guide
    their behavior. The motivation to act a certain
    way comes from within. They have progressed
    beyond just following the rules.

http//sarinda.edu.glogster.com/lawrence-kohlberg
48
Kohlbergs Six Stages of Moral Development
https//www.youtube.com/watch?vSjOpu1vINlQ
  • Level 1. Preconventional Morality
  • Stage 1. Obedience and Punishment Orientation
  • The child assumes that powerful authorities hand
    down a fixed set of rules which he or she must
    unquestioningly obey.
  • Stage 2. Individualism and Exchange
  • At this stage children recognize that there is
    not just one right view that is handed down by
    the authorities. Different individuals have
    different viewpoints.
  • Level II. Conventional Morality
  • Stage 3. Good Interpersonal Relationships.
  • At this stage children--who are by now usually
    entering their teens--see morality as more than
    simple deals. They believe that people should
    live up to the expectations of the family and
    community and behave in "good" ways.
  • Stage 4. Maintaining the Social Order
  • At this stage, in contrast, the respondent
    becomes more broadly concerned with society as a
    whole. Now the emphasis is on obeying laws,
    respecting authority, and performing one's duties
    so that the social order is maintained.
  • Level III. Postconventional Morality
  • Stage 5. Social Contract and Individual Rights
  • At stage 5, people begin to ask, "What makes for
    a good society?" They begin to think about
    society in a very theoretical way, stepping back
    from their own society and considering the rights
    and values that a society ought to uphold.
  • Stage 6 Universal Principles
  • According to these people, the principles of
    justice require us to treat the claims of all
    parties in an impartial manner, respecting the
    basic dignity, of all people as individuals. The
    principles of justice are therefore universal
    they apply to all.

49
The Scenario
  • Heinz and the Drug In Europe a woman was near
    death from a special kind of cancer. There was
    one drug that doctors thought might save her. It
    was a form of radium that a druggist in the same
    town had recently discovered. The drug was
    expensive to make, but the druggist was charging
    ten times what the drug cost to make. He paid
    200 for the radium and charged 2,000 for a
    small dose of the drug. The sick woman's husband,
    Heinz, went to everyone he knew to borrow the
    money, but he could only get together about
    1,000, which is half of what it cost. He told
    the druggist that his wife was dying and asked
    him to sell it cheaper or let him pay later. But
    the druggist said, "No, I discovered the drug and
    I'm going to make money from it." So Heinz got
    desperate and began to think about breaking into
    the man's store to steal the drug for his wife.
    Should Heinz steal the drug?

https//www.youtube.com/watch?v5czp9S4u26M
50
Howard Gardners Multiple Intelligences
  1. Bodily-Kinesthetic
  2. Musical-Rhythmic
  3. Logical-Mathematical
  4. Verbal-Linguistic
  5. Interpersonal
  6. Intrapersonal
  7. Visual-Spatial
  8. Naturalistic

51
MISCELLANEOUS THEORIST ASSIGNMENTS
  • Gallery Walk
  • Using the Gallery Walk handout, locate the
    required information that is displayed on the
    posters in the hallway.
  • Talk Show Interviews
  • Group students in pairs (interviewer/ theorist).
  • Interviewer will generate questions to ask the
    theorist and the theorist will review the
    necessary information to respond to the questions
  • Discuss insights as a class

52
Describe how major theories of human development
provide a basis for planning an environment and
activities that are developmentally appropriate
  • Studying and understanding children growth and
    development are important parts of teaching young
    children.
  • To help all children, you need to understand the
    sequence of their development.
  • Understanding theories about how people develop
    helps form your knowledge base in caring for
    young children.

53
Students TodayWho RU???
  • http//www.youtube.com/watch?vdGCJ46vyR9o
  • A Vision of Students Today

54
Other Ideas!!!
  • http//www.youtube.com/watch?vyKoEZJseVXU
    Blogging in the Classroom
  • http//www.youtube.com/watch?vaNmPaJDj-AY or do
    teachers need to go to this extent?
  • http//www.youtube.com/watch?v2yCB4i7GJuM what
    can you do to reach all cultures of students
    effectively?

55
Identify and investigate a variety of early
childhood care and education settings.
56
HOUSEKEEPING 1st Nine Weeks
  • Articles- MUST be labeled in the sourcebook with
    name of article, author, source, and date AND
    MUST be complete in order to get credit for 25
    Book Campaign (Complete documentation form)
  • Observation Journal Notes- must be dated and
    contain observation notes for each visit.
  • Field Experiences- Must be made up on the
    scheduled date (ASTEP). Please make an effort to
    be here on Thursday.
  • Missing Assignments- Please turn in assignments
    in a timely manner.
  • Sourcebooks- Please make every effort to keep
    them organized. Everything should be in its
    assigned section (Bell Ringers/Articles- 15/5,
    Notes, Observation Journals).
  • Kudos to Tyrek Tellis (1st Block)/Gracen Causey
    (2nd Block)
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Title: Introduction to ECE


1
Introduction to ECE
  • Historical Perspective
  • ET-ECE-5 Examine the theories of human
    development.

2
STANDARDS
  • ET-ECE-1 Demonstrate employability skills
    required by business and industry.
  • The following elements will be introduced and
    integrated throughout the content of this course.
  • 1.1 Communicate effectively through writing,
    speaking, listening, reading, and interpersonal
    abilities.
  • 1.2 Demonstrate creativity with multiple
    approaches to ask challenging questions resulting
    in innovative procedures, methods, and products.
  • 1.3 Exhibit critical thinking and problem
    solving skills to locate, analyze, and apply
    information in career planning and employment
    situations.
  • 1.4 Model work readiness traits required for
    success in the workplace including integrity,
    honesty, accountability, punctuality, time
    management, and respect for diversity.
  • 1.5 Apply the appropriate skill sets to be
    productive in a changing, technological, and
    diverse workplace to be able to work
    independently, interpret data, and apply team
    work skills.
  • 1.6 Present a professional image through
    appearance, behavior, and language.

3
GPS Focus Standards
  • GPS Academic Standards
  • ELA9-12W1, ELA9-12W3, ELA9-12LSV1, ELA9-12LSV2,
    ELA9-12RC1
  • ET-ECE-5 Examine the theories of human
    development.
  • 5.1 Describe how major theories of human
    development provide a basis for planning an
    environment and activities that are
    developmentally appropriate.
  • 5.2 Research and explain human development
    theories cognitive, psychosocial,
    psychoanalytical, and behaviorist.
  • 5.3 Analyze the impact of heredity and
    environment on the developing child.
  • 5.4 Investigate major child development theorist
    and theory contributions to the field of early
    childhood education.
  • 5.5 Discuss the impact of human development
    theories on the evolution of early childhood care
    and learning.
  • EDU-FS-8 Leadership and Teamwork
  • Learners apply leadership and teamwork skills in
    collaborating with others to accomplish
    organizational goals and objectives.

4
UNDERSTANDINGS GOALS
  • I Can Statements
  • Understand the value of children and their
    contribution to the future.
  • Determine the role of heredity and environment
    across the lifespan.
  • Analyze the effects of heredity and environment.
  • Describe how major theories of human development
    shape our view of young children and impact the
    structure of early childhood programs..
  • Essential Questions
  • How do children contribute to our future?
  • How were children valued in the past?
  • How has the education of children changed over
    time?
  • Who were the people who shaped our view of young
    children?
  • Have their views been supported by research and
    how have their views impacted early childhood
    programs in existence today?
  • Which is most influential, heredity or
    environment?

5
OPENING- BELL RINGER
  • Whats In Your Bag? Presentations
  • Dont forget permission slips are due for Field
    Experience by Thursday in order for you to be
    able to go!!!!
  • -Tuesday will be make-up detention for ALL
    missing assignments (ensure that it is made up
    today to avoid detention!!!!)
  • -Thursday will be the make-up day for ALL missed
    field experiences
  • Please ensure that your sourcebook is organized
    properly
  • Cover Page
  • Name
  • Period
  • 2014-2015
  • Intro to ECE
  • Table of Contents
  • (2 pages- front only)
  • Section 1- Notes
  • Section 2- Bell Ringers
  • Section 3- Observation Journal
  • Each section should be 30 pages apart

6
OPENING- BELL RINGER
All videos should be posted to Edmodo at this
point!! You must post comments to two videos
by TODAY!! Your post should include the
following -What is your overall opinion of the
video?-How could this particular family stressor
impact the student (academically, socially,
behaviorally, etc.)?-What could the teacher do
if it is determined that a student is dealing
with this particular family stressor and family
members are not aware of the impact that it has
on the child?
  • Please ensure that your sourcebook is organized
    properly
  • Cover Page
  • Name
  • Period
  • 2014-2015
  • Intro to ECE
  • Table of Contents
  • (2 pages- front only)
  • Section 1- Notes
  • Section 2- Bell Ringers
  • Section 3- Observation Journal
  • Each section should be 30 pages apart

7
OPENING- BELL RINGER
  • LAWRENCE KOHLBERG
  • Being a close follower of Jean Piagets theory of
    cognitive development, Kohlberg's work reflects
    and extends the work of his predecessor. He is
    famous for his work in moral development and
    education. His theory of moral development
    involved a series of stages, which he believed
    children must pass through in a fixed order.
    Kohlberg believed that progress from one stage to
    the next was based on social interactionopportuni
    ties to experience and reflect on situations
    involving moral decisions.
  • Therefore, he reasoned, participating in moral
    discussions with others, especially those at a
    higher level of moral reasoning, should lead to
    increased maturity in moral
  • judgment.
  • WHAT IS HIS CLAIM (THEORY)?

WARRANT WORKOUT Name(s) ___________________
________ Theorist
___________________________ Theorist Claim
___________________________ ______________________
_____ Supporting quotation or evidence _________
__________________ ___________________________ ___
________________________ Source
___________________________ ______________________
_____
8
OPENING- BELL RINGER
  • ABRAHAM MASLOW
  • WHAT IS HIS CLAIM (THEORY)?

WARRANT WORKOUT Name(s) ___________________
________ Theorist
___________________________ Theorist Claim
___________________________ ______________________
_____ Supporting quotation or evidence _________
__________________ ___________________________ ___
________________________ Source
___________________________ ______________________
_____
9
OPENING- BELL RINGER
  • ABRAHAM MASLOW

WARRANT WORKOUT Name(s) ___________________
________ Theorist
___________________________ Theorist Claim
___________________________ ______________________
_____ Supporting quotation or evidence _________
__________________ ___________________________ ___
________________________ Source
___________________________ ______________________
_____
10
OPENING- BELL RINGER
  • "Give me a dozen healthy infants, well-formed,
    and my own specified world to bring them up in
    and I'll guarantee to take any one at random and
    train him to become any type of specialist I
    might select -- doctor, lawyer, artist,
    merchant-chief and, yes, even beggar-man and
    thief, regardless of his talents, penchants,
    tendencies, abilities, vocations, and race of his
    ancestors."--John Watson, Behaviorism, 1930 What
    exactly did John Watson mean in the quote?
  • What is a behavior? Do you believe that behavior
    is defined more by heredity, environment or both?
    Why?
  • Please ensure that your sourcebook is organized
    properly
  • Cover Page
  • Name
  • Period
  • 2013-2014
  • Intro to ECE
  • Table of Contents
  • (2 pages- front only)
  • Section 1- Notes
  • Section 2- Bell Ringers
  • Section 3- Observation Journal

11
OPENING- BELL RINGER
  • Eriksons Hoedown
  • http//www.cteonline.org/portal/default/Curriculum
    /Viewer/Curriculum?action2cmobjid401088viewvi
    ewerrefcmobjid380348
  • Please ensure that your sourcebook is organized
    properly
  • Cover Page
  • Name
  • Period
  • 2013-2014
  • Intro to ECE
  • Table of Contents
  • (2 pages- front only)
  • Section 1- Notes
  • Section 2- Bell Ringers
  • Section 3- Observation Journal

Using the Chart and Scenarios provided, gather an
understanding of Eriksons stages and apply it to
the situation that you are given. Write your
response in your Sourcebook and be prepared to
have at least one person share your groups input.
12
OPENING- BELL RINGER
  • How have you and will you progress through each
    stage of Eriksons Psychological Stages?
  • How did you learn to trust/mistrust?
  • How did you develop feelings of confidence/lack
    of confidence?
  • Were/Are you a self-starter?
  • Do you feel sure of yourself? How did you learn
    to be?
  • Do you know who you will become?
  • Are you committed to love?
  • Are you concerned about your family and
    community?
  • Are you happy with your life at the moment?

13
OPENING/
WORK PERIOD
  • COMPLETE MISSING ASSIGNMENTS
  • ENSURE THAT SOURCEBOOKS ARE ORGANIZED (END OF
    NINE WEEKS APPROACHING!!)
  • Go to Edmodo
  • Click on the link for the Observation Journal 1
  • Use this form to type your journal entry and
    submit through the correct period
  • Save as Name-Course-Observation Journal
  • DUE ON YESTERDAY!!
  • Please ensure that your sourcebook is organized
    properly
  • Cover Page
  • Name
  • Period
  • 2014-2015
  • Intro to ECE
  • Table of Contents
  • (2 pages- front only)
  • Section 1- Notes
  • Section 2- Bell Ringers
  • Section 3- Observation Journal
  • Particulars
  • Theorist Name/Picture
  • Birth/Death/Birthplace
  • Educational Training (as it pertains to their
    theory)
  • Summary of Theory
  • Year the theory was introduced
  • Details of the Theory
  • How the Theory was proven
  • How the Theory impacted education

14
ARTICLE DAY- CHALK TALK RULES
  • Chalk Talk is a way to share your insights,
    perceptions and observations.
  • Most important rulethe class must remain
    absolutely silent. There is no speaking,
    responding, grunting, sighing. Basically, no
    noise making of any kind.
  • When the Chalk Talk begins, you are asked to
    respond to the questions or statements written on
    the chalk paper. You may respond using one-word
    answers, phrases, or questions. If students want
    to respond to something someone else has written
    they may draw a line from that response to their
    response. The end result will look like a giant
    web.

15
Theorist Chalk Talk
  • Lawrence Kohlberg
  • Jean Piaget
  • Abraham Maslow
  • Rudolph Steiner
  • Sigmund Freud
  • B. F. Skinner
  • Erik Erikson
  • John Locke

16
WORK PERIOD- Standard 5 (Historical Perspective-
Theorist)
  • Define vocabulary terms
  • Answer the following questions
  • Describe the three areas of development.
  • Describe the two areas of physical development.
  • List and explain the three principles of
    development.
  • List Eriksons eight psychosocial stages of
    development.
  • Describe the steps in Piagets Cognitive
    Development Theory.
  • Describe Piagets Stages of Development.
  • Describe Kohlbergs Six Stages of Moral
    Development.
  • Name the five levels of Maslows Hierarchy of
    Human Needs.
  • Name the eight areas identified in Gardners
    Multiple Intelligences Theory.
  • What is the difference between heredity and
    environment?
  • Identify the research of the child development
    theorist. Name the theorist and identify their
    theory.

17
WORK PERIOD- Family Stressor Video, Whats In
Your Bag, Sourcebook Notes
  • FAMILY STRESSOR VIDEO
  • All videos must be re-posted to Edmodo if the
    file does not end in wvm
  • Save as Name(s)-Video Title-Course/Period
  • You must post comments to two videos by
    WEDNESDAY!!
  • WHATS IN YOUR BAG?
  • Baggage to carry and drag you down or luggage
    to take you places and make you a strong person.
    While studying heredity/environment, you will
    discover what makes YOU who YOU are. You will
    decorate the outside of a paper bag or some other
    container with descriptions of traits that you
    inherit from others (heredity) or characteristics
    that are a part of your surroundings
    (environment). Fill the inside of bag/container
    with _5_ objects representing heredity and _5_
    objects symbolizing childhood environment.
  • PLEASE TURN IN IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY DONE SO.
  • Standard 5
  • (Historical Perspective- Theorist)
  • Define vocabulary terms
  • Answer the following questions
  • How do major theories of human development
    provide a basis for planning an environment and
    activities that are developmentally appropriate?
  • Describe the four human development theories
    cognitive, psychosocial, psychoanalytic, and
    behaviorist.
  • Outline Eriksons eight psychosocial stages of
    development.
  • What is the difference between the conscious and
    unconscious mind?
  • What is the difference between classical and
    operant conditioning?
  • What is the difference between heredity and
    environment?
  • Identify the research of the child development
    theorist.
  • DO NOT FORGET YOUR ECE FIELD EXPERIENCE
    PERMISSION SLIP

18
WORK PERIOD- Observation Journal, Sourcebook
Notes, Whats In Your Bag
  • OBSERVATION JOURNAL
  • Go to Edmodo
  • Click on the link for the Observation Journal
    Assignment- Historical Perspective
  • Use this form to type your journal entry and
    submit through the correct period
  • Save as Name-Period-Observation 2
  • Standard 3
  • (Historical Perspective- Theorist)
  • Define vocabulary terms
  • Answer the following questions
  • How do major theories of human development
    provide a basis for planning an environment and
    activities that are developmentally appropriate?
  • Describe the four human development theories
    cognitive, psychosocial, psychoanalytic, and
    behaviorist.
  • Outline Eriksons eight psychosocial stages of
    development.
  • What is the difference between the conscious and
    unconscious mind?
  • What is the difference between classical and
    operant conditioning?
  • What is the difference between heredity and
    environment?
  • Identify the research of the child development
    theorist.
  • DO NOT FORGET YOUR ECE FIELD EXPERIENCE
    PERMISSION SLIP

Make up missing assignments
19
Standard 3-Historical PerspectiveVocabulary
Terms
  • Windows of opportunity
  • Theory
  • Schemata
  • Multiple intelligences
  • Psychosocial
  • Psychoanalytical
  • Behaviorist
  • Development
  • Infant
  • Toddler
  • Preschooler
  • Maturation
  • Neurons
  • Synapses

20
Historical PerspectiveVocabulary Terms
  • Development- Change or growth in a human being
  • Maturation- Sequence of biological changes in a
    child giving the child new abilities
  • Neurons- Specialized nerve cells
  • Synapses-Connections between nerve cells that
    pass messages in the brain
  • Windows of opportunity- Specific spans of time
    for normal development of certain skills
  • Theory- A principle or idea that is proposed,
    researched, and generally accepted as an
    explanation
  • Schemata- Mental representations or concepts
  • Psychosocial- personality develops in a series of
    stages
  • Psychoanalytical- The Conscious and Unconscious
    Mind
  • Behaviorist- theory of learning based upon the
    idea that all behaviors are acquired through
    conditioning
  • Infant-Child from birth through the first year of
    life
  • Toddler-Children from the first year until the
    third birthday
  • Preschooler- Children ages three to six years
  • Multiple intelligences- Emphasizes different
    kinds of intelligences used by the human brain

21
Child DevelopmentAreas of Development
  • Physical Development- Physical body changes
  • Gross-Motor Development
  • Improvement of skills using the large muscles in
    the legs and arms (running, skipping, etc.)
  • Fine Motor Development
  • Involves the small muscles of the hands and
    fingers (grasping, cutting, drawing, etc.)
  • Cognitive (Intellectual) Development- Refers to
    processes people use to gain knowledge (Language,
    thought, reasoning, imagination)
  • Social-Emotional Development- Learning to relate
    to others through feelings and expression of
    feelings.

22
Principles of Development
  • Development proceeds from the head downward
    (cephalocaudal principle).
  • Development proceeds from the center of the body
    outward (proximodistal principle).
  • Development depends on maturation.

23
Investigate the impact of heredity and
environment on the developing child.
  • Environment- The circumstances or conditions that
    surround one surroundings.
  • The totality of circumstances surrounding an
    organism or group of organisms, especially
  • The combination of external physical conditions
    that affect and influence the growth,
    development, and survival of organisms "We shall
    never understand the natural environment until we
    see it as a living organism" (Paul Brooks).
  • The complex of social and cultural conditions
    affecting the nature of an individual or
    community.
  • Heredity is the passing of traits to offspring
    (from its parent or ancestors). This is the
    process by which an offspring cell or organism
    acquires or becomes predisposed to the
    characteristics of its parent cell or organism.

Heredity and Environment worksheet
24
Children Learn What They Live
  • If children live with criticism, They learn to
    condemn
  • If children live with hostility, They learn to
    fight
  • If children live with ridicule, They learn to be
    shy
  • If children live with shame, They learn to feel
    guilty.
  • If children live with encouragement, They learn
    confidence.
  • If children live with tolerance, They learn to be
    patient
  • If children live with praise, They learn to
    appreciate.
  • If children live with acceptance, They learn to
    love.
  • If children live with approval, They learn to
    like themselves.
  • If children live with honesty, They learn
    truthfulness.
  • If children live with security, They learn to
    have faith in themselves and others.
  • If children live with friendliness, They learn
    the world is a nice place in which to live.
  • What are your thoughts about this poem?

25
Children Learn What They Live
  • REMINDERS
  • Do not forget to turn in permission slips for ECE
    Field Experience
  • Complete and turn in Substitute Work (Textbook
    pages)/ Complete Fridays article
  • Complete ALL missing work (Family Stressor Video,
    Whats In Your Bag, Standard 4 Notes, etc.
  • If children live with criticism,
    They learn to condemn
  • If children live with hostility,    
    They learn to fight
  • If children live with ridicule,              
    They learn to be shy
  • If children live with shame,               They
    learn to feel guilty.
  • If children live with encouragement,
  • They learn confidence.
  • If children live with tolerance,              
    They learn to be patient
  • If children live with praise,               They
    learn to appreciate.
  • If children live with acceptance,              
    They learn to love.
  • If children live with approval,              
    They learn to like themselves.
  • If children live with honesty,              
    They learn truthfulness.
  • If children live with security,              
    They learn to have faith in
    themselves and others.
  • If children live with friendliness,            
      They learn the world is a nice place
    in which to live.
  • You will create a poster using the lines from the
    poem. 
  • You will find at least five pictures, using
    pictures cut from magazines that illustrates the
    intent of the poem. 
  • Cut and glue the pictures to a piece of
    construction to create a collage. 
  • The stanzas need to be referenced and identified
    within the collage of appropriate pictures.
  • Title the poster, "Chldren Learn What They
    Live".
  • You will identify, through writing, why you chose
    the pictures that you did.  You will need
    to share your rationale for each visual
    depiction.  This should be done on a separate
    sheet of paper and attach it to the poster.

26
WHATS IN YOUR BAG? ET-ECE-5 Examine the
theories of human development. Analyze
the impact of heredity and environment on the
developing child. 
  • Baggage to carry and drag you down or luggage
    to take you places and
  • make you a strong person. While studying
    heredity/environment, you will
  • discover what makes YOU who YOU are. You will
    decorate the outside of a
  • paper bag or some other container with
    descriptions of traits that you inherit
  • from others (heredity) or characteristics that
    are a part of your surroundings
  • (environment). Fill the inside of bag/container
    with _5_ objects representing
  • heredity and _5_ objects symbolizing childhood
    environment.
  • Present YOURSELF to the class.
  • ____ Objects Evident (60 Points)
  • Heredity _____ _____ _____
    _____ _____
  • Environment _____ _____ _____
    _____ _____
  • _____Description (15Points)
  • _____Presentation (15 Points)
  • _____Timeliness (10 Points)
  •  
  • All presentations must be completed by
    Wednesday, February 19th (Bags will be presented
    daily during Bell Ringer. Any bags that are not
    presented will still need to be submitted but
    will lose presentation and timeliness points)

27
WHATS IN YOUR BAG?
  • HEREDITY
  • Skin color- combination of both parents (mother
    light skin/ father dark skin) (liquid make-up)
  • Lips- mother has full lips (candy shaped like
    lips)
  • Height- both parents are short (ruler)
  • Organizational Skills- father did not like
    clutter/ mother believed in getting things done
    in a timely manner (planner)
  • Eyes- both parents have brown eyes (brown
    eye-liner)
  • ENVIRONMENT
  • God- mother ensured that we attended church,
    studied the bible (mini-bible)
  • Alcohol- father drank heavily (bottle top)
  • Education- neither parents graduated from high
    school but both urged my brother I to do so
    (teaching certificate/ Army memorabilia)
  • Reading- mother read the bible constantly-encourag
    ed me to read (book)
  • Family- took vacations, did activities as a
    family (family picture)

28
Major Child Development Theorist
  • Jean Piaget
  • Lawrence Kohlberg
  • Erik Erikson
  • Alfred Binet
  • Urie Bronfenbrenner
  • Benjamin Bloom
  • Maria Montessori
  • Sigmund Freud
  • Lev Vygotsky
  • Rudolph Dreikurs
  • John Dewey
  • B.F. Skinner
  • Anna Freud
  • Abraham Maslow
  • John Amos Comenius
  • John Locke
  • Jean Jacques Rousseau
  • Johann Pestalozzi
  • Fredrich Froebel
  • Rudolf Steiner
  • Patty Smith Hill
  • Lucy Sprague Mitchell
  • Abigail Eliot
  • Arnold Gesell
  • Bejamin Spock
  • T. Berry Brazelton
  • Margaret McMillan
  • Susan Isaacs
  • Loris Malaguzzi
  • Howard Gardner

29
Major Child Development Theorist
  • Jean Piaget- Childrens intellectual development
    proceeds through stages, as they adapt to the
    physical environment
  • Lawrence Kohlberg- Childrens moral development
    begins with a desire to avoid punishment and
    proceeds to the development of ethical principles
  • Erik Erikson- Personality develops according to
    how a person responds to psychological crises at
    certain stages of life
  • Alfred Binet- Inventor of the first usable
    intelligence test, today's IQ tests
  • Urie Bronfenbrenner- Ecological Systems Theory,
    and as a co-founder of the Head Start program in
    the United States for disadvantaged pre-school
    children
  • Benjamin Bloom- Taxonomy of Educational
    Objectives in the cognitive domain
  • Maria Montessori- Established the use of child
    sized furniture observed that children were
    bored, not unruly
  • Sigmund Freud- Considered the father of
    psychology
  • Lev Vygotsky- Believed in the Zone of Proximal
    Development
  • Rudolph Dreikurs- suggested that human
    misbehavior is the result of feeling a lack of
    belonging to one's social group child acts from
    one of four "mistaken goals" undue attention,
    power, revenge or avoidance (inadequacy).
  • John Dewey- Supported a child centered approach
    where children learn by doing. children should
    be able to explore the world around them. also
    encouraged the development of critical-thinking
    and problem-solving skills.
  • B.F. Skinner- Social developmentalist coined the
    term, operant conditioning
  • Anna Freud- Founder of child psychoanalysis
  • Abraham Maslow- Hierarchy of Human Needs
  • John Amos Comenius- father of modern education.

30
Major Child Development Theorist
  • John Locke- Founder of educational philosophy
    argues that the newborns mind is a blank slate
    Believed in the importance of nurture over
    nature.
  • Jean Jacques Rousseau- Believed that children are
    born naturally good Children can be corrupted by
    parents and/or society
  • Johann Pestalozzi- Believed that all children are
    capable of learning and activities should focus
    on the manipulation of objects.
  • Fredrich Froebel- Founder of kindergarten
    Promoted the value of play
  • Rudolf Steiner- founded a new spiritual movement,
    Anthroposophy
  • Patty Smith Hill- one of the leaders of the
    Kindergarten Movement in the US Founded the
    National Association for the Education of Young
    Children (NAEYC).
  • Lucy Sprague Mitchell- building experimental
    schools and as a researcher who carefully studied
    children's language-learning patterns
  • Abigail Eliot- pioneer of the nursery school
    movement
  • Arnold Gesell- Established the normative theory
    Believed children will develop according to how
    nature made them reach developmental milestones
    in sequence.
  • Bejamin Spock- first pediatrician to study
    psychoanalysis to try to understand children's
    needs and family dynamics
  • T. Berry Brazelton- a noted pediatrician and
    author in the United States. Major hospitals
    throughout the world use the Brazelton Neonatal
    Behavioral Assessment Scale (NBAS).
  • Margaret McMillan Childs overall welfare was
    the focus believe that teachers have an
    influence on a childs brain development during
    this formative time.
  • Susan Isaacs- published studies on the
    intellectual and social development of children
    and promoted the nursery school movement
  • Loris Malaguzzi- Developed Reggio Emilia School-
    Emphasizes the importance of creating authentic
    learning environments. Focuses on projects that
    allow a child to explore a personally meaningful
    concept or theme.
  • Howard Gardner- Theory of Multiple Intelligences.

31
THEORIST PRESENTATION
  • Particulars
  • Theorist Name/Picture
  • Birth/Death/Birthplace
  • Educational Training (as it pertains to their
    theory)
  • Summary of Theory
  • Year the theory was introduced
  • Details of the Theory
  • How the Theory was proven
  • How the Theory impacted education
  • See Sample Poster- Lawrence Kohlberg

32
THEORIST RESEARCH GUIDEIECE 3 Students will
identify major contributors to the field of early
childhood care and education and analyze their
implications for educational and childcare
practices.
  • Theorist Name ____________________________________
    _____
  • Birth _______________ Death _________
    Birthplace ___________
  • Educational Training
  • Details regarding their early education/life
  • Details regarding their education later in life
  • How did events that took place early in their
    life impact them?
  • Summary of Theory
  • What does your theorist believe (exact words)?
  • What does your theorist believe (your
    interpretation)?
  • What prompted their belief?
  • How the Theory was Proven
  • What method was used to research their belief?
  • (observation, interviews, research, readings,
    etc.)
  • Provide details about this method
  • How the Theory Impacted Education

33
TEÓRICO PRESENTACIÓN
  • DatosTeórico Nombre / ImagenNacimiento / Muerte
    / Lugar de nacimientoCapacitación Educativa (en
    lo que respecta a su teoría)
  • Resumen de la TeoríaAño de la teoría fue
    introducidaLos detalles de la Teoría
  • Cómo la teoría se comprobóCómo impactó la
    Teoría de la educación

34
THEORIST PRESENTATION
Compile information using the following www.prezi
.com www.glogster.com (7HCF1F)
  • Edmodo Submission
  • Prezi
  • Save and exit presentation
  • Click Share
  • Dialogue box will open
  • Copy Link
  • Go to Edmodo
  • Click Turn In (Theorist Presentation)
  • Click on Link symbol and paste
  • Click on Turn in Assignment
  • Particulars
  • Theorist Name/Picture
  • Birth/Death/Birthplace
  • Educational Training (as it pertains to their
    theory)
  • Summary of Theory
  • How the Theory was proven
  • How the Theory impacted education
  • Jean Piaget
  • Alfred Binet
  • Urie Bronfenbrenner
  • Maria Montessori
  • Lev Vygotsky
  • Rudolph Dreikurs
  • Haim Ginott
  • Anna Freud
  • John Amos Comenius
  • John Locke
  • Jean Jacques Rousseau
  • Johann Pestalozzi
  • Fredrich Froebel
  • Rudolf Steiner
  • Patty Smith Hill
  • Lucy Sprague Mitchell
  • Abigail Eliot
  • Arnold Gesell
  • Bejamin Spock
  • T. Berry Brazelton
  • McMillan Sisters
  • Susan Isaacs
  • Loris Malaguzzi

Sample Student Work http//prezi.com/yf5ceexnebux/
sigmund-freud/
35
THEORIST PRESENTATION
Compile information using the following
www.animoto.com or www.onetruemedia.com
  • Jean Piaget
  • Alfred Binet
  • Urie Bronfenbrenner
  • Maria Montessori
  • Lev Vygotsky
  • Rudolph Dreikurs
  • Haim Ginott
  • Anna Freud
  • John Amos Comenius
  • John Locke
  • Jean Jacques Rousseau
  • Johann Pestalozzi
  • Fredrich Froebel
  • Rudolf Steiner
  • Patty Smith Hill
  • Lucy Sprague Mitchell
  • Abigail Eliot
  • Arnold Gesell
  • Bejamin Spock
  • Particulars
  • Theorist Name/Picture
  • Birth/Death/Birthplace
  • Educational Training (as it pertains to their
    theory)
  • Summary of Theory
  • How the Theory was proven
  • How the Theory impacted education
  • Due by Thursday, February 20, 2014
  • WHATS IN YOUR BAG?
  • STILL DUE!!!

36
THEORIST PRESENTATION
Compile information using the following www.prezi
.com www.glogster.com (7HCF1F)
  • Edmodo Submission
  • Prezi
  • Save and exit presentation
  • Click Share
  • Dialogue box will open
  • Copy Link
  • Go to Edmodo
  • Click Turn In (Theorist Presentation)
  • Click on Link symbol and paste
  • Click on Turn in Assignment
  • DUE TODAY!!

THEORIST CHALK TALK _at_ 1100 A.M.
  • Particulars
  • Theorist Name/Picture
  • Birth/Death/Birthplace
  • Educational Training (as it pertains to their
    theory)
  • Summary of Theory
  • How the Theory was proven
  • How the Theory impacted education
  • Fredrich Froebel
  • Rudolf Steiner
  • Patty Smith Hill
  • Lucy Sprague Mitchell
  • Abigail Eliot
  • Arnold Gesell
  • Bejamin Spock
  • T. Berry Brazelton
  • McMillan Sisters
  • Susan Isaacs
  • Loris Malaguzzi
  • Jean Piaget
  • Alfred Binet
  • Urie Bronfenbrenner
  • Maria Montessori
  • Lev Vygotsky
  • Rudolph Dreikurs
  • Haim Ginott
  • Anna Freud
  • John Amos Comenius
  • John Locke
  • Jean Jacques Rousseau
  • Johann Pestalozzi

THEORIST PRESENTATION EVALUATION
37
ABRAHAM MASLOW 1908-1970
38
HIERARCHY OF HUMAN NEEDS
  • The physiological needs.  These include the needs
    we have for oxygen, water, protein, salt, sugar,
    calcium, and other minerals and vitamins.  They
    also include the need to maintain a pH balance
    (getting too acidic or base will kill you) and
    temperature (98.6 or near to it).  Also, theres
    the needs to be active, to rest, to sleep, to get
    rid of wastes (CO2,  sweat, urine, and feces), to
    avoid pain, and to have sex.  Quite a collection!
  • The safety and security needs.  When the
    physiological needs are largely taken care of,
    this second layer of needs comes into play.  You
    will become increasingly interested in finding
    safe circumstances, stability, protection.  You
    might develop a need for structure, for order,
    some limits.
  • The love and belonging needs.  When physiological
    needs and safety needs are, by and large, taken
    care of, a third layer starts to show up.  You
    begin to feel the need for friends, a sweetheart,
    children, affectionate relationships in general,
    even a sense of community.  Looked at negatively,
    you become increasing susceptible to loneliness
    and social anxieties.
  • The esteem needs.  Next, we begin to look for a
    little self-esteem.  Maslow noted two versions of
    esteem needs, a lower one and a higher one.  The
    lower one is the need for the respect of others,
    the need for status, fame, glory, recognition,
    attention, reputation, appreciation, dignity,
    even dominance.  The higher form involves the
    need for self-respect, including such feelings as
    confidence, competence, achievement, mastery,
    independence, and freedom.  Note that this is the
    higher form because, unlike the respect of
    others, once you have self-respect, its a lot
    harder to lose!

Deficit needs, or D-needs.  If you dont have
enough of something -- i.e. you have a deficit --
you feel the need. 
Homeostasis. Your body, when it lacks a certain
substance, develops a hunger for it.
39
Self-Actualization
  • The last level is called growth motivation (in
    contrast to deficit motivation), being needs (or
    B-needs, in contrast to D-needs), and
    self-actualization. These people were
    reality-centered, which means they could
    differentiate what is fake and dishonest from
    what is real and genuine.  They were
    problem-centered, meaning they treated lifes
    difficulties as problems demanding solutions, not
    as personal troubles to be railed at or
    surrendered to.  And they had a different
    perception of means and ends.  If you want to be
    truly self-actualizing, you need to have your
    lower needs taken care of, at least to a
    considerable extent. 
  • The self-actualizers also had a different way of
    relating to others.  First, they had a need for
    privacy, and were comfortable being alone.  They
    were relatively independent of culture and
    environment, relying instead on their own
    experiences and judgments.  And they resisted
    enculturation, that is, they were not susceptible
    to social pressure -- they were, in fact,
    nonconformists in the best sense.
  • Further, they had what Maslow called democratic
    values, meaning that they were open to ethnic and
    individual variety, even treasuring it.  They had
    the quality called Gemeinschaftsgefühl -- social
    interest, compassion, humanity.  And they enjoyed
    intimate personal relations with a few close
    friends and family members, rather than more
    shallow relationships with many people.
  • They had an unhostile sense of humor --
    preferring to joke at their own expense, or at
    the human condition, and never directing their
    humor at others.  They had a quality he called
    acceptance of self and others, by which he meant
    that these people would be more likely to take
    you as you are than try to change you into what
    they thought you should be.  This same acceptance
    applied to their attitudes towards themselves 
    If some quality of theirs wasnt harmful, they
    let it be, even enjoying it as a personal quirk. 
    Along with this comes spontaneity and
    simplicity  They preferred being themselves
    rather than being pretentious or artificial.  In
    fact, for all their nonconformity, he found that
    they tended to be conventional on the surface,
    just where less self-actualizing nonconformists
    tend to be the most dramatic.
  • And these people had a certain freshness of
    appreciation, an ability to see things, even
    ordinary things, with wonder.  Along with this
    comes their ability to be creative, inventive,
    and original.  And, finally, these people tended
    to have more peak experiences than the average
    person.  A peak experience is one that takes you
    out of yourself, that makes you feel very tiny,
    or very large, to some extent one with life or
    nature or God.  It gives you a feeling of being a
    part of the infinite and the eternal.  These
    experiences tend to leave their mark on a person,
    change them for the better, and many people
    actively seek them out.  They are also called
    mystical experiences, and are an important part
    of many religious and philosophical traditions.

40
Erik Erikson
1902 - 1994
  • His theory states
  • Eight Stages of Development
  • Stage 1 - Trust vs. Mistrust
  • Stage 2 - Autonomy vs. Shame and Doubt
  • Stage 3 - Initiative vs. Guilt
  • Stage 4 - Industry vs. Inferiority
  • Stage 5 - Identity vs. Confusion
  • Stage 6 - Intimacy vs. Isolation
  • Stage 7 - Generativity vs. Stagnation
  • Stage 8 - Integrity vs. Despair

41
ERICKSONS PSYCHOSOCIAL STAGES
Erikson believed people experience a conflict
that serves as a turning point in development. In
Eriksons view, these conflicts are centered on
either developing a psychological quality or
failing to develop that quality. During these
times, the potential for personal growth is high,
but so is the potential for failure.
42
Erikson Scenarios
  • Stage 1 In Singapore, some parents are leaving
    their babies in a 24 hour stay in center full
    time for weeks or months the babies are looked
    after by trained nannies that are rotated after 3
    weeks to prevent babies from becoming too
    attached to one person. What are some possible
    reasons the center does not want a baby to be
    attached to one person? Do you think it is good
    to prevent attachment? If yes why? If no why?
  • Stage 2 Toddlers are beginning to recognize they
    are separate people with their own desires and
    activities. Caregivers should provide many
    opportunities for toddlers to make choices. Some
    caregivers, in an attempt to comfort a toddler
    after a fall or something say Naughty floor, you
    made Johnny fall! What is the toddler learning
    from the adults response? Identify two
    statements caregivers can make to teach industry.
  • Stage 3 Imaginative play is a basic activity of
    this stage. Preschoolers explore and reenact
    different roles and activities daily. In light of
    this knowledge, what are your views about
    children acting out television characters? Give
    reasons. Does the violence influence children?
    Why or Why not? Give reasons for your answer.
  • Stage 4 School Age A lot of emphasis an age is
    based in academic performance. Children who can
    not master their work may consider themselves a
    failure. AS a teacher how can you accept Childs
    efforts without placing value judgments on what
    is accomplished? How can you limit feelings of
    inferiority?

43
Jean Piaget
1896 - 1980
  • Cognitive Development Theory
  • Schemata-mental representations or concepts.
  • Adaptation- mentally organizing what is perceived
    in the environment.
  • Assimilation-taking in new information and adding
    it to what the child already knows.
  • Accommodation- Adjusting what is already known to
    fit the new information.

44
Jean Piaget
1896 - 1980
  • Stages of Development
  • Sensorimotor Stage (birth to two)- infants use
    all their senses to explore and learn.
  • Preoperational Stage (two to seven)- children are
    egocentric assume others see the world the same
    way they do.
  • Concrete Operations Stage (seven to eleven)-
    children develop the capacity to think
    systematically, only when they can refer to
    actual objects and use hands-on activities.

45
B.F. Skinner
1904 - 1990
  • His theory
  • Based on operant conditioning.  The
    organism is in the process of operating on the
    environment, which in ordinary terms means it is
    bouncing around its world, doing what it does. 
    During this operating, the organism encounters
    a special kind of stimulus, called a reinforcing
    stimulus, or simply a reinforcer.  This special
    stimulus has the effect of increasing the operant
    -- that is, the behavior occurring just before
    the reinforcer.  This is operant conditioning 
    the behavior is followed by a consequence, and
    the nature of the consequence modifies the
    organisms tendency to repeat the behavior in the
    future.
  • One example of this is

Imagine a rat in a cage. This is a special cage
(called, in fact, a Skinner box) that has a bar
or pedal on one wall that, when pressed, causes a
little mechanism to release a foot pellet into
the cage.  The rat is bouncing around the cage,
doing whatever it is rats do, when he
accidentally presses the bar and -- hey, presto!
-- a food pellet falls into the cage! The operant
is the behavior just prior to the reinforcer,
which is the food pellet, of course.  In no time
at all, the rat is furiously peddling away at the
bar, hoarding his pile of pellets in the corner
of the cage. A behavior followed by a
reinforcing stimulus results in an increased
probability of that behavior occurring in the
future. What if you dont give the rat any more
pellets?  Apparently, hes no fool, and after a
few futile attempts, he stops his bar-pressing
behavior.  This is called extinction of the
operant behavior.
46
Research and explain human development theories
cognitive, psychosocial, psychoanalytic, and
behaviorist.
  • Pschoanalytic- The Conscious and Unconscious Mind
  • The Structure of the Conscious and Unconscious
    Mind According to Freud
  • The conscious mind includes everything that we
    are aware of. This is the aspect of our mental
    processing that we can think and talk about
    rationally. A part of this includes our memory,
    which is not always part of consciousness but can
    be retrieved easily at any time and brought into
    our awareness. Freud called this ordinary memory
    the preconscious.
  • The unconscious mind is a reservoir of feelings,
    thoughts, urges, and memories that outside of our
    conscious awareness. Most of the contents of the
    unconscious are unacceptable or unpleasant, such
    as feelings of pain, anxiety, or conflict.
    According to Freud, the unconscious continues to
    influence our behavior and experience, even
    though we are unaware of these underlying
    influences.
  • Behaviorist- a theory of learning based upon the
    idea that all behaviors are acquired through
    conditioning.
  • Classical conditioning is a technique used in
    behavioral training in which a naturally
    occurring stimulus is paired with a response.
    Next, a previously neutral stimulus is paired
    with the naturally occurring stimulus.
    Eventually, the previously neutral stimulus comes
    to evoke the response without the presence of the
    naturally occurring stimulus. The two elements
    are then known as the conditioned stimulus and
    the conditioned response.
  • Operant conditioning Operant conditioning
    (sometimes referred to as instrumental
    conditioning) is a method of learning that occurs
    through rewards and punishments for behavior.
    Through operant conditioning, an association is
    made between a behavior and a consequence for
    that behavior.

47
Lawrence Kohlberg Theory is based upon how
children develop morally.
  • Preconventional children begin life with no
    sense of right or wrong. However, children learn
    quickly that certain behaviors are punished and
    other behaviors are rewarded. Therefore, they
    avoid behaviors that are punished and strive for
    behavior or acts that are rewarded.
  • Conventional At approximately age 9, children
    learn to behave according to a sense of what
    others need or want. They will follow rules that
    have been established and respect authority. The
    children are now acting in regards to right and
    wrong. Basically, children have learned the
    typical or conventional ways of acting based upon
    what is right and what is wrong.
  • Post Conventional around the age of 16,
    individuals mature morally. They respect human
    rights and develop individual principles to guide
    their behavior. The motivation to act a certain
    way comes from within. They have progressed
    beyond just following the rules.

http//sarinda.edu.glogster.com/lawrence-kohlberg
48
Kohlbergs Six Stages of Moral Development
https//www.youtube.com/watch?vSjOpu1vINlQ
  • Level 1. Preconventional Morality
  • Stage 1. Obedience and Punishment Orientation
  • The child assumes that powerful authorities hand
    down a fixed set of rules which he or she must
    unquestioningly obey.
  • Stage 2. Individualism and Exchange
  • At this stage children recognize that there is
    not just one right view that is handed down by
    the authorities. Different individuals have
    different viewpoints.
  • Level II. Conventional Morality
  • Stage 3. Good Interpersonal Relationships.
  • At this stage children--who are by now usually
    entering their teens--see morality as more than
    simple deals. They believe that people should
    live up to the expectations of the family and
    community and behave in "good" ways.
  • Stage 4. Maintaining the Social Order
  • At this stage, in contrast, the respondent
    becomes more broadly concerned with society as a
    whole. Now the emphasis is on obeying laws,
    respecting authority, and performing one's duties
    so that the social order is maintained.
  • Level III. Postconventional Morality
  • Stage 5. Social Contract and Individual Rights
  • At stage 5, people begin to ask, "What makes for
    a good society?" They begin to think about
    society in a very theoretical way, stepping back
    from their own society and considering the rights
    and values that a society ought to uphold.
  • Stage 6 Universal Principles
  • According to these people, the principles of
    justice require us to treat the claims of all
    parties in an impartial manner, respecting the
    basic dignity, of all people as individuals. The
    principles of justice are therefore universal
    they apply to all.

49
The Scenario
  • Heinz and the Drug In Europe a woman was near
    death from a special kind of cancer. There was
    one drug that doctors thought might save her. It
    was a form of radium that a druggist in the same
    town had recently discovered. The drug was
    expensive to make, but the druggist was charging
    ten times what the drug cost to make. He paid
    200 for the radium and charged 2,000 for a
    small dose of the drug. The sick woman's husband,
    Heinz, went to everyone he knew to borrow the
    money, but he could only get together about
    1,000, which is half of what it cost. He told
    the druggist that his wife was dying and asked
    him to sell it cheaper or let him pay later. But
    the druggist said, "No, I discovered the drug and
    I'm going to make money from it." So Heinz got
    desperate and began to think about breaking into
    the man's store to steal the drug for his wife.
    Should Heinz steal the drug?

https//www.youtube.com/watch?v5czp9S4u26M
50
Howard Gardners Multiple Intelligences
  1. Bodily-Kinesthetic
  2. Musical-Rhythmic
  3. Logical-Mathematical
  4. Verbal-Linguistic
  5. Interpersonal
  6. Intrapersonal
  7. Visual-Spatial
  8. Naturalistic

51
MISCELLANEOUS THEORIST ASSIGNMENTS
  • Gallery Walk
  • Using the Gallery Walk handout, locate the
    required information that is displayed on the
    posters in the hallway.
  • Talk Show Interviews
  • Group students in pairs (interviewer/ theorist).
  • Interviewer will generate questions to ask the
    theorist and the theorist will review the
    necessary information to respond to the questions
  • Discuss insights as a class

52
Describe how major theories of human development
provide a basis for planning an environment and
activities that are developmentally appropriate
  • Studying and understanding children growth and
    development are important parts of teaching young
    children.
  • To help all children, you need to understand the
    sequence of their development.
  • Understanding theories about how people develop
    helps form your knowledge base in caring for
    young children.

53
Students TodayWho RU???
  • http//www.youtube.com/watch?vdGCJ46vyR9o
  • A Vision of Students Today

54
Other Ideas!!!
  • http//www.youtube.com/watch?vyKoEZJseVXU
    Blogging in the Classroom
  • http//www.youtube.com/watch?vaNmPaJDj-AY or do
    teachers need to go to this extent?
  • http//www.youtube.com/watch?v2yCB4i7GJuM what
    can you do to reach all cultures of students
    effectively?

55
Identify and investigate a variety of early
childhood care and education settings.
56
HOUSEKEEPING 1st Nine Weeks
  • Articles- MUST be labeled in the sourcebook with
    name of article, author, source, and date AND
    MUST be complete in order to get credit for 25
    Book Campaign (Complete documentation form)
  • Observation Journal Notes- must be dated and
    contain observation notes for each visit.
  • Field Experiences- Must be made up on the
    scheduled date (ASTEP). Please make an effort to
    be here on Thursday.
  • Missing Assignments- Please turn in assignments
    in a timely manner.
  • Sourcebooks- Please make every effort to keep
    them organized. Everything should be in its
    assigned section (Bell Ringers/Articles- 15/5,
    Notes, Observation Journals).
  • Kudos to Tyrek Tellis (1st Block)/Gracen Causey
    (2nd Block)
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