SWPBS (aka EBS) 10 Year Perspective - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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SWPBS (aka EBS) 10 Year Perspective

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SWPBS (aka EBS) 10 Year Perspective George Sugai OSEP Center on PBIS University of Oregon Center for Behavioral Education & Research University of Connecticut – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: SWPBS (aka EBS) 10 Year Perspective


1
SWPBS (aka EBS) 10 Year Perspective
  • George Sugai
  • OSEP Center on PBIS
  • University of Oregon
  • Center for Behavioral Education Research
  • University of Connecticut
  • March 11, 2008
  • www.pbis.org www.cber.org
  • George.sugai_at_uconn.edu

2
PURPOSE Acknowledge what we have learned over
last 10 years
  • Where did SWPBS come from?
  • Has triangle been useful?
  • What about academic achievement?
  • Is SWPBS program or system?
  • What about next 10 years?

3
World Events for 1997
  • Deep Blue defeats Garry Kasparov in chess rematch
  • Hong Kong reverts to China after 156 years as
    British Colony
  • Space station 'Mir' experiences life threatening
    malfunctions accidents
  • 1st Harry Potter book published
  • Clinton US president of US Chretien Canadian
    prime minister
  • Seinfeld, Men in Black, Candle in the Wind (E.
    John)
  • Millions commemorate 20th anniversary of Elvis'
    death
  • Princess Diana killed in Paris car crash
  • 3 high school students killed in Paducah KY
  • Iowa woman gives birth to septuplets all survive
  • Adult sheep named Dolly successfully cloned in
    Scotland
  • Center on PBIS awarded to university collaborative

4
Where did SWPBS come from?
5
Before1997
  • No such thing as www
  • No such thing as PBIS Center
  • Pre-PowerPointtransparencies
  • Concern about school climate problem behavior
  • EBS Effective Behavior Support

6
1985
7
2008
8
Evolution School-wide Positive Behavior Support
2008 OR PBS PBIS-III?
1986 Bohemia Elementary (1)
2007 USF Scaling Up Center
1988 Project PREPARE (4)
2003 OSEP TA PBIS-2 Center (40/6600)
1994 Effective Behavior Support Project (6)
2001 OR Behavior Research Center
1996 Fern Ridge Middle
1998 OSEP TA PBIS Center (15/1000)
9
Fern Ridge Middle School
Circa 1996
Taylor-Greene et al., 1996
10
Pre
Post
11
  • SWPBS Conceptual Foundations

Behaviorism
ABA
EBS/PBS
SWPBS
12
PBIS objective.
  • Redesign support teaching learning
    environments that are effective, efficient,
    relevant, durable
  • Outcome-based
  • Data-guided decision making
  • Evidence-based practices
  • Systems support for accurate sustained
    implementation

13
Has triangle been useful?
14
Circa 1996
15
Original logic public health disease
prevention (Larson, 1994)
  • Tertiary (FEW)
  • Reduce complications, intensity, severity of
    current cases
  • Secondary (SOME)
  • Reduce current cases of problem behavior
  • Primary (ALL)
  • Reduce new cases of problem behavior

16
(No Transcript)
17
Tertiary Prevention Specialized
Individualized Systems for Students with
High-Risk Behavior
CONTINUUM OF SCHOOL-WIDE INSTRUCTIONAL
POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT
5
Secondary Prevention Specialized Group Systems
for Students with At-Risk Behavior
15
Primary Prevention School-/Classroom- Wide
Systems for All Students, Staff, Settings
80 of Students
18
Triangle ?s you should ask!
  • Where did it come from?
  • Why not a pyramid or octagon?
  • Why not 12 tiers? 2 tiers?
  • Whats it got to do w/ sped?
  • Where those come from?

19
05
20
11
22
84
58
SWPBS schools are more preventive
20
SWIS 06-07 (Majors Only) 1974 schools 1,025,422
students 948,874 ODRs
Grades Sch Mean Enroll Mean ODRs/100/Day
K-6 1288 446 .34 (.37) 1/300/day
6-9 377 658 .98 (1.36) 1/100/day
9-12 124 1009 .93 (.83) 1/107/day
K-(8-12) 183 419 .86 (1.14) 1/120/day
Rule violations happen
21
Mean Proportion of Students
3 8 89
10 16 74
11 18 71
ODR rates vary by level
K6 (N 1010) 6-9 (N 312)
9-12 (N 104)
22
A few kids get many ODRs
32 43 25
48 37 15
45 40 15
K-6 (N 1010) 6-9 (N 312)
9-12 (N 104)
23
ODR rates vary by grade
24
What about academic achievement?
25
Its not just about behavior!
STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT
Good Teaching
Behavior Management
Increasing District State Competency and
Capacity
Investing in Outcomes, Data, Practices, and
Systems
26
Designing School-Wide Systems for Student Success
Circa 1996
1-5
1-5
5-10
5-10
80-90
80-90
27
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28
RtI
29
RtI Good IDEiA Policy
  • Approach or framework for redesigning
    establishing teaching learning environments
    that are effective, efficient, relevant,
    durable for all students, families educators
  • NOT program, curriculum, strategy, intervention
  • NOT limited to special education
  • NOT new

30
Quotable Fixsen
  • Policy is
  • Allocation of limited resources for unlimited
    needs
  • Opportunity, not guarantee, for good action
  • Training does not predict action
  • Manualized treatments have created overly rigid
    rapid applications

31
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32
RtI Application Examples
EARLY READING/LITERACY SOCIAL BEHAVIOR
TEAM General educator, special educator, reading specialist, Title I, school psychologist, etc. General educator, special educator, behavior specialist, Title I, school psychologist, etc.
UNIVERSAL SCREENING Curriculum based measurement SSBD, record review, gating
PROGRESS MONITORING Curriculum based measurement ODR, suspensions, behavior incidents, precision teaching
EFFECTIVE INTERVENTIONS 5-specific reading skills phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension Direct social skills instruction, positive reinforcement, token economy, active supervision, behavioral contracting, group contingency management, function-based support, self-management
DECISION MAKING RULES Core, strategic, intensive Primary, secondary, tertiary tiers
33
Responsiveness to Intervention Academic
Social Behavior
34
RTI Continuum of Support for ALL
Few
Some
All
Dec 7, 2007
35
RCT etc. Algozzine et al., Horner et al., Leaf et
al.,
  • Improvements in school climate
  • Decreases in ODR
  • Improvements in perceived school safety
  • Improvements in achievement
  • Standardized achievement tests
  • High levels of implementation fidelity

36
Is SWPBS Program or System?
37
Positive Behavior Support
Supporting Decision Making
Supporting Staff Behavior
DATA
SYSTEMS
PRACTICES
Circa 1996
Supporting Student Behavior
38
Supporting Social Competence Academic
Achievement
Basics 4 PBS Elements
OUTCOMES
Supporting Decision Making
DATA
Supporting Staff Behavior
SYSTEMS
PRACTICES
Supporting Student Behavior
39
GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS Getting Started
Team
Agreements
Data-based Action Plan
Implementation
Evaluation
40
Sample Implementation Map
  • 2 years of school team training
  • Annual booster events
  • Coaching/facilitator support _at_ school district
    levels
  • Regular self-assessment evaluation data
  • On-going preparation of trainers
  • Development of local/district leadership teams
  • Establishment of state/regional leadership
    policy team

41
Organization of behavioral subsystems
Circa 1996
42
SWPBS Subsystems
School-wide
Classroom
What does SWPBS look like?
Family
Non-classroom
Student
43
School-wide
  • 1. Common purpose approach to discipline
  • 2. Clear set of positive expectations behaviors
  • 3. Procedures for teaching expected behavior
  • 4. Continuum of procedures for encouraging
    expected behavior
  • 5. Continuum of procedures for discouraging
    inappropriate behavior
  • 6. Procedures for on-going monitoring evaluation

44
Reinforcement Wisdom!
  • Knowing or saying know does NOT mean will
    do
  • Students do more when doing worksappropriate
    inappropriate!
  • Natural consequences are varied, unpredictable,
    undependable,not always preventive

45
Non-classroom
  • Positive expectations routines taught
    encouraged
  • Active supervision by all staff
  • Scan, move, interact
  • Precorrections reminders
  • Positive reinforcement

46
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47
Classroom
  • Classroom-wide positive expectations taught
    encouraged
  • Teaching classroom routines cues taught
    encouraged
  • Ratio of 6-8 positive to 1 negative adult-student
    interaction
  • Active supervision
  • Redirections for minor, infrequent behavior
    errors
  • Frequent precorrections for chronic errors
  • Effective academic instruction curriculum

48
Romanowich, Bourett, Volmer, 2007
49
Individual Student
  • Behavioral competence at school district levels
  • Function-based behavior support planning
  • Team- data-based decision making
  • Comprehensive person-centered planning
    wraparound processes
  • Targeted social skills self-management
    instruction
  • Individualized instructional curricular
    accommodations

50
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51
(No Transcript)
52
Family
  • Continuum of positive behavior support for all
    families
  • Frequent, regular positive contacts,
    communications, acknowledgements
  • Formal active participation involvement as
    equal partner
  • Access to system of integrated school community
    resources

53
CONTINUUM of SWPBS
  • TERTIARY PREVENTION
  • Function-based support
  • Wraparound/PCP
  • Special Education
  • Audit
  • Identify existing practices by tier
  • Specify outcome for each effort
  • Evaluate implementation accuracy outcome
    effectiveness
  • Eliminate/integrate based on outcomes
  • Establish decision rules (RtI)

5
15
  • SECONDARY PREVENTION
  • Check in/out
  • Targeted social skills instruction
  • Peer-based supports
  • Social skills club
  • PRIMARY PREVENTION
  • Teach encourage positive SW expectations
  • Proactive SW discipline
  • Effective instruction
  • Parent engagement

80 of Students
54
What about next 10 years?
55
How do we..
  • Increase adoption of effective behavioral
    instructional technologies in classrooms
    schools?
  • Ensure high fidelity of implementation of these
    technologies?
  • Increase efficient, sustained scaled
    implementation of these technologies?
  • Increase accurate, efficient, durable
    institutionalized use of these technologies?

56
Class B Results
Fairbanks, Sugai, Gardino, Lathrop, 2007.
Percent of Intervals Engaged in Problem Behavior

School Days
57
Study 2 Results
Percent of Intervals Engaged in Problem Behavior
School Days
58
PBS Systems Implementation Logic
Visibility
Funding
Political Support
Leadership Team Active Coordination
Training
Evaluation
Coaching
Local School Teams/Demonstrations
59
SUSTAINABLE IMPLEMENTATION DURABLE RESULTS
THROUGH CONTINUOUS REGENERATION
Continuous Self-Assessment
Relevance Priority Efficacy Fidelity
Valued Outcomes
Effective Practices
Practice Implementation
Local Implementation Capacity
60
Questions
  • Pre-service preparation induction process
  • Educator expectations, learning histories,
    outcomes, reinforcers
  • Administrative leadership
  • Collaborative inter-agency interactions
  • Values, culture, context, learning histories,
    reinforcers of organization
  • Policy guidance accountability
  • Research development
  • Urban ghettos, rural isolation, high schools,
    mental health, etc., etc.

61
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