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Division of School Improvement

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Division of School Improvement 2014 Summer Summit Critical Connections for Leaders Georgia s New Assessment Landscape Jan Reyes, Ed.D. Assessment Specialist – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Division of School Improvement


1
Division of School Improvement 2014 Summer
Summit Critical Connections for
Leaders Georgias New Assessment Landscape
Jan Reyes, Ed.D. Assessment Specialist Assessment
and Accountability Georgia Department of
Education jreyes_at_doe.k12.ga.us
Melissa Fincher, Ph.D. Associate Superintendent
for Assessment and Accountability Georgia
Department of Education mfincher_at_doe.k12.ga.us
2
  • What are the critical connectionswe must make to
    support and strengthen the processes for
    promoting continual progress in our districts
    and schools?

3
A NEW Assessment System
Georgia Milestones Georgia Milestones Assessment
System
Georgia Milestones will consist of both end of
grade (EOG) and end of course (EOC) measures.
4
Georgia Milestones
  • Comprehensive
  • single program, not series of tests (e.g., CRCT
    EOCT WA) formative assessment tools to
    compliment summative
  • Coherent
  • consistent expectations and rigor to position
    Georgia students to compete with peers nationally
    and internationally
  • consistent signal about student preparedness for
    the next level, be it the next grade, course, or
    college/career
  • consistent signal about student achievement both
    within system (across grades and courses) and
    with external measures (NAEP PSAT SAT ACT)
  • Consolidated
  • combine reading, language arts, and writing into
    a single measure to align to the standards

5
Coherency Consistency
  • Achievement of Georgia Students in Mathematics
  • 2013
  • NAEP Grade 4 39 at/above proficient
  • CRCT Grade 4 84 met/exceeded
  • Achievement of Georgia Students in Reading
  • 2013
  • NAEP Grade 4 34 at/above proficient
  • CRCT Grade 4 93 met/exceeded
  • Achievement of Georgia Students in Science
  • 2011 (NAEP) / 2013 (CRCT)
  • NAEP Grade 8 30 at/above proficient
  • CRCT Grade 8 74 met/exceeded (67 in 2011)

6
Coherency Consistency
  • Achievement of Georgia Students in Mathematics
  • 2013
  • NAEP Grade 8 29 at/above proficient
  • CRCT Grade 8 83 met/exceeded
  • Coordinate Algebra EOCT 37 met/exceeded
  • SAT Class of 2013 42 college ready
    benchmark
  • ACT Class of 2013 38 college ready
    benchmark
  • 2012
  • PSAT sophomores 37 on track to be CCR

7
Coherency Consistency
  • Achievement of Georgia Students in Reading
  • 2013
  • NAEP Grade 8 32 at/above proficient
  • CRCT Grade 8 97 met/exceeded
  • 9th Grade Literature EOCT 86 met/exceeded
  • American Literature EOCT 91 met/exceeded
  • SAT Class of 2013 43 college ready
    benchmark
  • ACT Class of 2013 43 college ready
    benchmark
  • 2012
  • PSAT sophomores 40 on track to be CCR

SAT data represent 71 of Class of 2013 ACT
data represent 51 of Class of 2013
8
Georgia Milestones
  • Guiding principles stipulate that Georgia
    Milestones
  • be sufficiently rigorous to ensure Georgia
    students are well positioned to compete with
    other students across the United States and
    internationally
  • be intentionally designed across grade levels to
    send a clear signal of student progress/growth
    and preparedness for the next level, be it the
    next grade level, course, or college or career
  • be accessible to all students, including those
    with disabilities or limited English proficiency,
    at all achievement levels
  • support and inform educator effectiveness
    initiatives, ensuring items and forms are
    appropriately sensitive to quality instructional
    practices and
  • accelerate the transition to online
    administration, allowing over time for the
    inclusion of innovative technology-enhanced items.

9
Georgia Milestones
Georgia Milestones will include norm-referenced
items.
  • Grades 3 8
  • End of Grade (EOG) in language arts, mathematics,
    science, social studies
  • High School
  • End of Course (EOC) in 9th Grade Literature
    Composition, American Literature Composition,
    Coordinate Algebra, Analytic Geometry, Physical
    Science, Biology, US History, and Economics

Georgia Milestones will include
constructed-response items, performance tasks,
and selected-response items in language arts and
mathematics.
10
Our Assessment Landscaping is Changing
  • Assessment development is a process, not an event
  • information and ancillary materials will be made
    provided as soon as available
  • Georgia is transitioning from a set of
    long-standing, mature programs
  • districts, schools, students, parents, and the
    public are familiar with and know what to expect
  • This transition provides Georgia with an
    opportunity
  • however, as with any change, there will be
    periods of uncertainty and discomfort

11
Resources to Move Us Forward
12
Resources Available NOW
  • Content standards
  • frameworks, formative lessons, PARCC evidence
    statements
  • Sample items
  • formative items via Georgia OAS
  • released items via PARCC, SBAC, other states (KY,
    NY), NAEP
  • CRCT Readiness Indicators
  • Lexiles

In Fall 2014, the Georgia Online Formative
Assessment Resource (GOFAR) will launch within
the SLDS and replace the OAS.
13
CRCT Readiness IndicatorsReading, ELA,
Mathematics
  • Indicators were designed to send a signal to
    stakeholders about where students are relative to
    where they need to be headed
  • Indicators provide feedback about our
    preparedness for the increase in rigor and
    expectation for student achievement that is on
    the horizon
  • Feedback consists of the percent of students who
    achieved each readiness level state , district,
    and school levels for instructional planning
    purposes

While we cannot guarantee that students who
achieve the On-Track level will be proficient on
the new assessment, we do know they will be
better prepared and positioned to be successful.
14
CRCT Readiness IndicatorsReading, ELA,
Mathematics
  • For instructional planning and decision making
  • Needs Additional Support The student has
    demonstrated that his or her command of the
    knowledge and skills described in the CCGPS
    warrants additional instructional supports.
  • On Track The student has demonstrated that his
    or her command of the knowledge and skills
    described in the CCGPS is sufficient the student
    is on track for success at the next level.
  • Commendable The student has demonstrated that
    his or her command of the knowledge and skills
    described in the CCGPS is exemplary.

15
Lexiles
16
Lexiles
17
Lexiles with CRCT Readiness Indicators
Lexiles Grade 3 Grade 4 Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8
Common Core Stretch Text Lower Limit 520 740 830 925 970 1010
Common Core Stretch Text Upper Limit 820 940 1010 1070 1120 1185
On Track 625 775 845 930 970 1070
Commendable 890 990 1085 1155 1210 1265
Reader Lower Limit 330 445 565 665 735 805
Reader Upper Limit 700 810 910 1000 1065 1100
2013 Median 790 860 940 1070 1095 1210
18
Formative Assessment InitiativesBringing a
Balanced Assessment Focus to the Classroom
Statewide launch in summer 2013
1600 new items loaded
Phase I available February 2014 Phase II pilot
in winter 2014
19
Overall ELA Pilot Summary Data
20
Overall Math Pilot Summary Data
21
Key Findings From Pilots of Formative Open-Ended
Items
  • Overall performance shortfalls
  • Students are not familiar with these types of
    items
  • Many respond dnk as in do not know
  • Dont seem to understand the need to show their
    work, detail their thoughts, rationales, cite
    evidence to support their answer or claim
  • Tendency is to cite answer only as if a
    multiple-choice item
  • Dont read carefully and answer all parts of the
    question/item

22
Sample Open-Ended ItemEnglish Language Arts -
Grade 6
  • Passage The Tall Rock
  • A story told by a boy who is visiting his
    grandfathers house. He describes climbing
    Mountain Rock with his younger brother and how
    the rock seems to have gotten smaller as he has
    grown up.

23
Extended Response ItemW.6.3 RL.6.6 W.6.3b
W.6.4 L.6.1
  • Write a conclusion to the story, told from the
    narrators point of view twenty years later. Your
    narrative should describe the narrators
    conclusions about the childhood experiences with
    Mountain Rock, but now from the perspective of an
    adult.
  •   
  • Use details from the text to support your answer.
  • Answer with complete sentences, and use correct
    punctuation and grammar.

24
Rubric
Score Designation Description
4 Thoroughly Demonstrated The student demonstrates a thorough understanding by writing a conclusion from the narrators point of view as an adult. The conclusion describes the narrators conclusions in a way that logically relates to events from the story, and that refers to many specific details from the story. For example, the adult narrator would logically have fond memories of Mountain Rock. The student uses complete sentences, correct punctuation and grammar.
3 Clearly Demonstrated The student demonstrates a clear understanding by writing a conclusion from the narrators point of view. The conclusion presents the narrators conclusions as an adult, and it logically follows from events in the story. The conclusion includes a few relevant details from the story some details may be general. The student uses mostly correct sentences, punctuation and grammar.
2 Basically Demonstrated The student demonstrates a basic understanding by writing a conclusion about the narrators childhood experiences with Mountain Rock. The conclusion deviates somewhat from the scenario set up in the task, either by failing to plausibly establish the narrator as an adult, or by creating inconsistencies. The student uses minimal support from the story some support may be incorrect or irrelevant. The student uses some correct sentences, punctuation and grammar.
1 Minimally Demonstrated The student demonstrates a minimal understanding by writing a conclusion that fails to address the topic of the narrators childhood experiences, but rather continues where the story leaves off, or presents the narrator as an adult in a way that does not relate to childhood experiences. Examples could include a conclusion in which the narrators family unpacks the car and then enjoys a picnic by Mountain Rock, or a conclusion in which the narrator describes his/her job or family as an adult. The student includes no support from the story. The response has significant errors in constructing complete sentences, and/or in using correct punctuation and grammar.
0 Incorrect or irrelevant The response is incorrect or irrelevant.
25
Exemplar Response
It was a long time ago the last time I visited
Mountain Rock. My grandparents sold their house
about ten years ago and moved to an apartment.
Even though I am now an adult, I still like to
think about the fun I had on Mountain Rock. Of
course I got taller and taller until finally I
could just step on top of the rock without any
help. It was cool to think that when I was just a
little kid I needed Grandpa to help me climb the
rock. Even when the rock didnt seem like a big
mountain, Grandpa still had to lift me to the top
for a long time. One summer when I was a teenager
we took our five-year-old cousin Tracy with us to
visit my grandparents. On the way there I shouted
I get to climb first. Nick thought that was
hilarious and said, You kids and your rock!
just like our mom used to say. Ill always have
happy memories of Mountain Rock.
26
Student ResponseScore 4
  • Twenty Years later,I still remember those olden
    days we used to vist my grandparent's big white
    house right up the hill on summer days. when i
    was little he'd swing me up through the air.the
    whole hill spun me around the sky was blue and
    bright.and, the tree's everywhere looked green
    and enormus.I used to climb the mountain rock.Oh
    how we loved mountain rock.everytime my brother
    said" I get to climb first. my mother would say
    "you kids and your rock.When we reached their
    house my brother would run and start to climb the
    rock my arents would just smile put their hands
    around each other and watch.And i'd just watch
    looking down.after my grandpa welcolmed us for a
    second i thought the rock got smaller but it was
    just that i was getting taller.But all at once i
    had a though no matter how big,tall or the older
    i got this would always be the tallest place.I
    sure do love those memories and i will always
    keep them!!

The response presents the narrators conclusion
in a way that logically relates to events from
the story and that refers to many specific
details from the story. While on the surface this
response may appear to summarize the story, the
way in which the student handles the language and
retelling makes it clear that the narrator truly
is reliving fond childhood events twenty years
later. The student demonstrates a thorough
command of the conventions of standard English.
Though there are a few minor errors, primarily
typographical, meaning is clear throughout the
response.
27
Student ResponseScore 3
  • 20 years later, I had grown into a full grown,
    mature adult. When we would visit my grandparents
    i would travel with my mom, dad, and brother. Now
    that I am an adult I travel with my wife and two
    girls. I still climb on the "Mountain Rock" just
    mot as much as I did when I was a kid. Now that I
    am grown I help my kids climb the wall. They love
    climbing the wall even more than I did when I was
    their age. They are always arguing on the trip to
    my grandparent's house. The main argument is "Who
    is going to get to clim bthe wall first." Maybe,
    I will be a grandparent someday and have a
    "Mountain Rock" for my grandkids to climb on.

The response includes a few relevant details from
the story. In order to achieve a higher score,
the student needs one or two additional specific
details from the story. The student demonstrates
command of the conventions of standard English.
There are a few distracting errors in grammar and
usage but meaning is clear.
28
Student ResponseScore 2
  • I used to enjoy the climb on the boulder at
    grandpa's house and how tall i used to feel , and
    i would anticapate all six hours of the ride
    there. The rock used to be like a mouantian to
    me, but now when I revisit I can tell that I have
    grown alot throughout the years. But I will
    always remember the thrill of being so high, and
    to this day it is still the tallest place in the
    world to me.

The student does not plausibly establish the
narrator as an adult. While the student appears
to show the narrator reflecting on the past, it
is difficult to determine whether or not he or
she places the narrator twenty years later or
merely summarizes the narrators feelings in the
story provided. The student uses a few details
from the story, but, in order to achieve a higher
score, he or she needs to more clearly show that
the setting is twenty years later. The student
demonstrates an inconsistent command of the
conventions of standard English. There are a few
distracting errors in grammar and usage, but they
do not impede understanding.
29
Student ResponseScore 1
  • I realized it was the rock that made it worth
    while,even thought the rock was not big to my
    eyes it was big to my mind,which made the whole
    trip alot more memorible,and i couldnt wait to
    come back next year.

The student demonstrates a minimal understanding
by writing a conclusion that does not address the
narrators childhood experiences but rather
continues where the story leaves off. While the
student does include support from the story, his
or her approach is not acceptable for a higher
score. The student demonstrates an inconsistent
command of the conventions of standard English.
There are a few errors in grammar and usage, but
they do not impede understanding.
30
Observations from Scoring
  • Some students wrote a non-narrative
  • 20 years later, the narrator could bring his on
    children to Mountain Rock and remember the good
    times he had on Mountain rock himself.
  • Some students wrote in third person
  • the kids really loved that rock,and they will all
    ways remeber it as if it was there home.When they
    have kids they will show them the rock too so
    they can climb it too.
  • Some responses were too brief to adequately
    address the prompt
  • I may have gotten older, but its times like
    these that make me still feel how I felt when I
    was little.
  • It has been more than 20years since I have
    climbed the mountions.
  • He Rerember Those Experiences Because They Where
    Fun

31
Benchmark AssessmentImplementation Schedule
Phase I Fall 2013 pilot Available February 2014
Phase II Winter 2014 pilot Available Fall 2014
  • ELA
  • Grades 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, and 10
  • Mathematics
  • Grades 1, 2, 3, and Coordinate Algebra
  • U.S. History
  • ELA
  • Grades 4, 5, 9, and 11
  • Mathematics
  • Grades 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, Analytic Geometry, and
    Advanced Algebra
  • Biology

32
FIP Learning Modules
  • Introduction to Formative Instructional Practices
  • Clear Learning Targets
  • Collecting and Documenting Evidence of Student
    Learning
  • Analyzing Evidence and Providing Effective
    Feedback
  • Student Ownership of Learning Peer Feedback,
    Self-Assessment, and More
  • Leading Formative Instructional Practices (for
    district and/or school leaders)
  • Coaching Formative Instructional Practices (for
    instructional coaches and/or teacher leaders)

FIP aligns to TKES and LKES!
33
NAEP Item Tool
Workshops Available Bobbie Bable, NAEP State
Coordinator (404.657.6168 bbable_at_doe.k12.ga.us)
34
We value your input, thank you!
35
Division of School Improvement 2014 Summer
Summit Critical Connections for
Leaders Georgias New Assessment Landscape
Jan Reyes, Ed.D. Assessment Specialist Assessment
and Accountability Georgia Department of
Education jreyes_at_doe.k12.ga.us
Melissa Fincher, Ph.D. Associate Superintendent
for Assessment and Accountability Georgia
Department of Education mfincher_at_doe.k12.ga.us
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