FREEDOM AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


Title: FREEDOM AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT


1
FREEDOM AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT 2013-2014 Response
to Intervention (RtI)
Academic Response to Intervention
(RtI) Behavioral Response to Intervention (RtI)
(Positive Behavior Support - PBS)
Parent/Guardian Presentation March 31, 2014
2
FASD Goals Align to DPI Expectations
Accountability Reform 2011-12 to 2013-14
RtI Implementation (Dec. 1, 2013)
Smarter Balanced Assessment 2014-15 (LA/Math)
Common Core State Standards Since 2010
Student Information System 2012-17
Educator Effectiveness 2014-15
3
FREEDOM GRADUATE
College and Career Ready
CRITICAL THINKING
1. What do we want all students to learn or
be able to do?
  • 2. How will we know when each student
  • has learned it?

ENGAGED
SKILLED
Curriculum WI Model Academic Standards
Common Core Standards (CCSS)
Disciplinary
Literacy Next Generation Science Standards
(NGSS) PBS (Behavioral RtI)  Literacy
Reading Speaking Financial Writing
Listening Digital  Lifetime
Health/Wellness  Quality Universal
Instruction  Differentiated Instruction  Quadran
t D Lessons
 Assessment Formative Assessments
Summative Assessments STAR Enterprise
Assessments - Universal Screener -
Diagnostic Screener Performance/Project-Based
Assessments RRR - Quadrant D
Assessments Smarter Balanced
Assessments WKCE/ACT Aspire/ACT/ACT
WorkKeys  21st Century Skills Technology
Tools Creativity 11 Computing / BYOD
Independent Thinking/Learning  Options
Engagement Virtual/Online Classes
Project/Process Based Learning Flipped
Classrooms
CULTURALLY AWARE
INDUSTRIOUS
PRINCIPLED
TOOLS OF TECHNOLOGY
UNIVERSAL DATA
3. How will we respond when a student
experiences difficulty in learning or needs
acceleration?
 Response to Intervention (RtI)  Gifted
and Talented Program  Parental
Involvement  Differentiated and Tiered
Instruction
4
WHAT IS RESPONSE TO INTERVENTION (RtI)???
RtI stands for Response to Intervention. RtI
is a process for achieving higher levels of
academic and behavioral success for all students
through high quality instruction, continuous
review of student progress, and collaboration.
Why are schools and districts interested in RtI?
Schools and districts are interested in higher
levels of student success in academics and
behavior, areas in which RtI shows a great deal
of promise. RtI results in improved outcomes, in
part, because it is focused on setting goals and
measuring progress toward those goals.
http//www.wisconsinrticenter.org/home.html
5
Discrepancy Model-vs-Response to Intervention
Brief Background - (SLD Law)
  • IQ scores vs. achievement scores.
  • Does not help students who have low scores on
    both assessments.
  • Students who missed basic reading skills can also
    present a discrepancy.
  • Students have to fail before they are qualified.

Essentially In the past, guidelines suggested
that schools wait for students to fail before
truly intervening and/or intervention took
place. RtI is very different.
6
GENERAL RtI PRACTICES..
School-Wide Screening (September, January,
May) The school gives all students a screening
test usually three times each year so that
teachers and staff will know which students need
extra help with academic work or
behavior. Progress Monitoring For students
needing extra help, school staff members
frequently (for example, at least once every
week) check the progress of each child to see
what changes, if any, need to be made in the
instruction. Tiered Instruction Within the RtI
structure are several tiers, or levels, of
instruction. General education is referred to as
Tier 1. Additional tiers, usually two or three,
use increasingly intense levels of instruction
(for example, smaller groups, more time, more
progress monitoring). High-Quality,
Research-Based Instruction and Interventions All
school staff members use instructional methods
and materials that have been proven to work
effectively. Collaboration Among School Staff
Members School staff members (including the
principal, general education teachers, special
education teachers, reading specialists, and
school psychologists) work together to help each
child be successful. Fidelity of
Implementation School staff members make sure
that instructional materials and methods are used
exactly as intended.
7
School-wide Screening (UNIVERSAL SCREENING (K-12)
(September, January, May)
STAR Enterprise Math/Reading STAR Early
Literacy
8
School-wide Screening (UNIVERSAL SCREENING (K-12)
(September, January, May)
Percentile Rank
GP Grade Placement SS Scaled Score GE
Grade Equivalent PR Percentile Rank NCE Norm
Curve Equivalent IRL
Instructional Reading Level ORF Est.
Oral Reading Fluency
Text Selection Levels ZPD Zone of Proximal
Development ATOS2000 Scaled Reading
Score (similar to Lexile Levels) ZPD2000 ZPD
converted to ATOS
9
School-wide Screening (Universal Screening K-12)
1
Tier III
5-10
Students Needing Intervention
Tier II
85-95
Tier I
Non-Intervention Students Quality
Instruction Differentiation Enrichment
Universal Quality Curriculum ALL Students
10
RtI Groups 5-10 of student population will
begin Tier II Intervention based on data (Math
and/or Reading) Parent Letter seeking
approval for individual interventions. Begin
specific documentation logs for each child
(Progress Monitoring). Small group
intervention (students not pulled from
universal curriculum for intervention). SIT
processes used to share data/progress.
Enrichment/Guided Study/GT/Etc. Groups (During
RtI Time) 90-95 of student population will
receive enrichment and/or guided study type
opportunities. Various samples of these
opportunities on the next few pages.. (K-12).
11
ACTIVITIES FOR STUDENTS NOT NEEDING DIRECT
INTERVENTION
Enrichment, Guided Study, GT Opportunities, etc.
KINDERGARTEN (Reading) Recess News interactive
writing, recounting events of recess Compound
words creation, matching and drawing their
own Short vowel activities Booklet creation for
example (What I Wear in the Snow) for independent
writing Mad libs to discuss nouns, verbs,
adjectives, etc Story comparisons Extending
thematic ideas with other stories   KINDERGARTEN
(Math) Math Expressions Differentiated
Instruction activities Using manipulatives to
represent a number Finding partners of
numbers Using linking cubes for addition and
subtraction equations SmartBoard activities on
Math Expressions itools (MegaMath Games) Making
teen numbers with a group of 10 and left over
ones Rolling two dice, adding the numbers
together, finding sums Students writing their own
math story problems Students drawing pictures to
match a math story problem Comparing two numbers
to determine greater/less
GRADE 1 (Reading) Readers Theatre Sight
Words Word Family Bingo Making words Writing Short
/long vowel activities Author studies   GRADE 1
(Math) Math Expressions On Level activities and
Quick Practices SmartBoard Activities ABCya.com
games in math Writing math fables Individual
journaling to solve and explain math problems
12
Enrichment, Guided Study, GT Opportunities,
etc. (Continued.)
GRADE 2 (Reading) SmartBoard /web activities in
reading Ipads to enhance understanding of current
concepts Readers Theatre Scholastic News
Bulletins Sight word activities Games (Word
Bingo) Partner Reading Read Books out loud GRADE
2 (Math) Math Expressions Differentiated
curriculum Math manipulatives (clocks, connecting
cubes, measuring tools, money/coins) Daily
routine from Math Expressions to increase number
sense Math journaling to increase student ability
to explain and think through writing SmartBoard/we
b activities in Math Ipads to enhance student
understanding of current concepts
GRADE 3 (Reading) Readers Theatre National
Geographic activities Scholastic News and skill
sheets (CAFÉ review) CAFÉ skills reviewed and
practices inference, word attack,
comprehension, etc. Shared reading
activities Reading white board games
fact/opinion GRADE 3 (Math) Math Expressions
Differentiated Instruction Cards and Tier 1
Lessons Math Expressions Challenge Activities on
the website Brain Games Math Enrichment
activities Math Games addition, subtraction,
multiplication, division, problem solving, tan
grams Supportive challenge math work sheets
13
Enrichment, Guided Study, GT Opportunities,
etc. (Continued.)
GRADE 4 (Reading) Readers Theatre Leveled
reading passages at a higher level, to challenge
students Classroom novels Writing complete
questions, story elements, and understanding
vocabulary Project assessment Novels on
tape GRADE 4 (Math) Math Expressions Challenge
Activities Use Ipads for math word problems Math
Games Thematic units of study (an example 2014
Olympics)
GRADE 5 (Reading) Creating Newspapers, and proof
read and read to others Current events in
Newspapers Present news articles in class for
public speaking Summary of what students read Use
of eye contact, voice, and be articulate in
presentations Scholastic News Comprehension Debate
questions from Scholastic News Life Saver
Writing - students create an argument in writing
with support Writing to present details,
transition and discussions GRADE 5 (Math) Math
Expressions reviewing previous days lessons in
a game style approach Math Expressions Anytime
Problems and Quick Time Problems Math Expressions
Differentiated Cards for RtI
14
Enrichment, Guided Study, GT Opportunities,
etc. (Continued.)
Gifted and Talented Intervention Time
Activities (Grades 1-5)   1st Grade Read
Sideways Stories from Wayside School, discussed
favorite teachers, typed a word
document on that teacher.   2nd Grade Read
Wayside School, created a newspaper on the
computer using a template,
formed/shared opinions in the newspaper.   3rd
Grade Same as 2nd plus started reading Pinballs,
working on creating a document on the
Computer.   4th Grade Read Matilda, did
a project of their choosing (using Bloom's)
Starting reading Holes,
created a newspaper article on the computer, made
a brochure (using a computer
template) on Holes.   5th Grade Read Matilda,
did a project of their choosing (using Bloom's)
Starting reading Holes,
created a newspaper article on the computer, made
a brochure (using a computer
template) on Holes.
15
Enrichment, Guided Study, GT Opportunities,
etc. (Continued.)
Freedom Middle School (Non-Intervention
Activities) 6th Grade Guided Study
A. A very structured study hall
1. Review Grades in computer,
check for missing/late assignments, etc.
2. Opportunity for make-up
work, extra assistance, organization skills,
etc. 7th Grade Guided Study
A. A very structured study hall
1. Review Grades in computer, check
for missing/late assignments, etc.
2. Opportunity for make-up work,
extra assistance, organization skills, etc. 8th
Grade Guided Study A. A
very structured study hall
1. Review Grades in computer, check for
missing/late assignments, etc.
2. Opportunity for make-up work, extra
assistance, organization skills, etc. Gifted and
Talented Intervention Time Activities (Grades
6-8) 6th Grade eCybermission (online
science/math based competition) studying health
and nutrition. 7/8th Grade They meet together
Spread the Word to End the Word awareness week,
creating posters,
ordering shirts, contacting administration,
writing announcements,
collaborating, etc. Freedom High School
(Non-Intervention Activities) Grades 9-12
Guided Study A. A very
structured study hall
1. Review Grades in computer, check for
missing/late assignments, etc.
2. Opportunity for make-up work,
extra assistance in subject areas, organization
skills, etc.
16
Sept. / Jan. / May ()
Progress Monitoring
Tier II
STAR Enterprise Math/Reading /STAR Early Literacy
5-10
School-wide Screening The school gives all
students a screening test usually three times
each year so that teachers and staff will know
which students need extra help with academic work
or behavior. Progress Monitoring For students
needing extra help, school staff members
frequently (for example, at least once every
week) check the progress of each child to see
what changes, if any, need to be made in the
instruction. Tiered Instruction Within the RTI
structure are several tiers, or levels, of
instruction. General education is referred to as
Tier 1. Additional tiers, usually two or three,
use increasingly intense levels of instruction
(for example, smaller groups, more time, more
progress monitoring). High-Quality,
Research-Based Instruction and Interventions All
school staff members use instructional methods
and materials that have been proven to work
effectively. Collaboration Among School Staff
Members School staff members (including the
principal, general education teachers, special
education teachers, reading specialists, and
school psychologists) work together to help each
child be successful. Fidelity of
Implementation School staff members make sure
that instructional materials and methods are used
exactly as intended.
RtI Interventions Tier II
17
Response to Intervention (RtI)
Tiered Instruction
Academic Behavioral Flowchart
UNIVERSAL INSTRUCTIONAL OPTIONS-TIER I General
Curriculum Taught and Assessed Classroom and/or
Common Assessments and/or Universal Screeners
measure progress Implement best teaching
practice, differentiation, accommodations, and
modifications Contact parent/guardian regarding
student progress Speed Referral Track for
urgent issues
Tier I
Instruction Successful Continue Monitor in
General Curriculum
General Instruction Unsuccessful Proceed to
Selected Options-Tier II
Speed Referral
SELECTED OPTIONS-TIER II First Intervention Interv
entions are formulated and implemented by
classroom teacher and/or in collaboration with
grade level/content team members Monitor
intervention for 4 weeks using a minimum of pre,
mid and post assessments. Document progress using
student tracking form. Contact parent/guardian
regarding interventions and student progress
Speed Referral Track for urgent issues
Tier II
Interventions Unsuccessful Proceed to
second intervention
Interventions Successful Continue Monitor
Progress
SELECTED OPTIONS-TIER II Second
Intervention Interventions are formulated and
implemented by classroom teacher and/or in
collaboration with grade level/content team
members Interventions need to be more intense and
increased frequency or length of meetings Team
members share ongoing results with each other and
get feedback and input from team Continue or
revise classroom intervention(s) after 4 weeks .
Contact parent/guardian regarding interventions
and student progress

Interventions Unsuccessful Proceed
to Tier III
Interventions Successful Continue Monitor
Progress
TARGETED OPTIONS-TIER III Collaborate and develop
interventions with grade level and appropriate
Resource team members. Interventions need to be
more intense with increased frequency or length
of meetings and groups of 1-2 students. Implement
and/or revise interventions for 8 weeks Involve
parent/guardian regarding interventions and
student progress.
Tier III
Interventions Successful Continue Monitor
Progress
Interventions Unsuccessful Submit all information
to SIT
18
How can a school restructure to support RtI?
The school can organize its intervention efforts
into 3 levels, or Tiers, that represent a
continuum of increasing intensity of support.
(Kovaleski, 2003 Vaughn, 2003). Tier I is the
lowest level of intervention and Tier III is the
most intensive intervention level.
Universal intervention Available to all
students Example Additional classroom literacy
instruction, differentiation, etc.
Tier I
Individualized Intervention Students who need
additional support than peers are given
individual intervention plans. Example Small
Group Intervention
Tier II
Intensive Intervention Students whose
intervention needs are greater than general
education can meet may be referred for more
intensive services. Example 11 Intervention
Tier III
19
Other Academic Reports STAR Enterprise/STAR
Early Literacy
20
Other Academic Reports STAR Enterprise/STAR
Early Literacy
Student Growth Percentile (SGP) 35-65 (1-99)
Comparison to National Peers
21
Other Academic Reports STAR Enterprise/STAR
Early Literacy
  • GOAL
  • High Growth
  • High Proficiency

22
Other Academic Reports STAR Enterprise/STAR
Early Literacy
23
GENERAL RtI PRACTICES..
School-Wide Screening (PALS, RR, STAR Enterprise
Math/Reading, STAR Early Literacy, etc.) The
school gives all students a screening test
usually three times each year so that teachers
and staff will know which students need extra
help with academic work or behavior. Progress
Monitoring (STAR, CBMs, Formative Assessments,
etc.) For students needing extra help, school
staff members frequently (for example, at least
once every week) check the progress of each child
to see what changes, if any, need to be made in
the instruction. Tiered Instruction (ie Tier I,
Tier II, Tier III) Within the RtI structure are
several tiers, or levels, of instruction. General
education is referred to as Tier 1. Additional
tiers, usually two or three, use increasingly
intense levels of instruction (for example,
smaller groups, more time, more progress
monitoring). High-Quality, Research-Based
Instruction and Interventions All school staff
members use instructional methods and materials
that have been proven to work effectively. (ie
Wisconsin Academic Standards, Common Core State
Standards (Math/Language Arts), Daily 5, CAFÉ,
Math Expressions, LLI Kits, Guided Reading,
Teacher Effectiveness Model, etc.)
Collaboration Among School Staff Members School
staff members (including the principal, general
education teachers, special education teachers,
reading specialists, and school psychologists)
work together to help each child be successful.
(ie Common Planning time increased at FES,
Student Intervention Teams (SIT) Formed and SIT
Processes Developed and Implemented, etc.)
Fidelity of Implementation School staff members
make sure that instructional materials and
methods are used exactly as intended.
(Continually Ongoing Process)
24
BEHAVIORAL RtI Positive Behavioral Support
(PBS)
Your IRISH Best is RRS Respectful Responsible
Safe
25
BEHAVIORAL RtI POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORTS (PBS)
BENEFITS 1. Reduction of unnecessary
disciplinary referrals. 2. Increased staff
coordination and consistency when dealing
with severe behaviors. 3. Improved school
climate. 4. Enhanced school safety. 5. Improved
staff communication and coordination when
managing student behavior. 6. Increased positive
interactions between staff and students. 7.
Improved staff skills in effective supervision
and positive behavior support. 8. Use of
data-based decision making regarding behavior and
discipline practices. (Sprick,
Garrison, Howard, 2002) Foundations, Safe
Civil Schools Series
26
BEHAVIORAL RtI POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORTS (PBS)
  • BACKGROUND RESEARCH - RtI BEHAVIORAL FRAMEWORK
  • Randy Sprick, et al. Foundations Program
  • Chris Weber, et al. Pyramid of Behavior
    Interventions (PLC work)
  • George Sugai, et al. PBIS Model (University of
    Oregon, etc.)
  • Freedom Area School District Model was derived
    from these
  • three models.

Providing integrated support through both
academic and behavior RtI models produce
larger gains in both outcomes than relying on a
single model in isolation. (Lane Menzies,
2003) Education and Treatment of Children RtI
(behavior) programs reduce the inappropriate
referrals of students for special education
services, and it increases student engagement
along with improving the overall numbers of
students achieving grade level standards.

(M. Burns, 2008) Principal
Leadership

27
ULTIMATE QUESTION????????
  • Were a students academic struggles caused by
    their frequent non-compliant behaviors, or were
    their frequent non-compliant behaviors a result
    of their academic frustration?

ACADEMIC CHALLENGES OR BEHAVIORAL
CHALLENGES????? A SCHOOL MUST ADDRESS BOTH
VARIBLES TO HELP ALL CHILDREN SUCCEED
28
ACADEMIC BEHAVIORAL RtI COMPARISON
RtI Academic
Tier I A. Universal Academic Curriculum (All subjects) B. Universal Screening (STAR) Tier II A. RtI/Enrichment/Guided Study 1. Diagnostic measures 2. Small Group Intervention 3. Progress Monitoring/ Data Tracking 4. Specific duration/intensity Tier III A. Individualized intervention 1. Intensity/ Duration 2. Progress Monitoring/Data Tracking
RtI Behavior
Tier I A. Universal Behavior Lessons (All common areas) B. Universal Screening 1. Past/Current behavior data/surveys/etc. Tier II A. RtI/Enrichment/Guided Study 1. Re-teach behavior lessons (individual/small group) 2. Individual Behavior Plan (IBP) (Progress Monitoring/Data Tracking) 4. Specific duration/intensity Tier III A. Individualized intervention 1. Intensity/ Duration 2. FBA (Progress Monitoring/ Data Tracking
29
Freedom Middle School Your IRISH Best is RRS Freedom Middle School Your IRISH Best is RRS Freedom Middle School Your IRISH Best is RRS Freedom Middle School Your IRISH Best is RRS
Common Area Be Respectful Be Responsible Be Safe
All Settings 1. Dress, speak, and act appropriately 2. Be considerate of others 3. Always use good manners 4. Settle conflicts appropriately 1. Be prepared at all times 2.Help keep school clear of debris and litter 3. Arrive to school on time 4. Return materials from home 1. Follow all school rules, directions, and expectations 2. Move safely 3. Listen to instructions 4. Be aware of others around you
Hallways, Stairs, Entryway 1.Talk quietly 2. Be polite to others 3. Respect other people and their possessions 4. Wait your turn 1.Come in right away when the bell rings 2. Wipe your feet 3. Keep lockers neat and organized 4. Keep hallways clean 1. Walk (especially stairs) 2. Keep your hands and feet to yourself 3. Walk on right side 4. Be aware of others at lockers
Lunchroom 1. Offer others a place to sit 2. Use inside voice 3. Sit properly at table 4. Eat your own food 5. Wait for your turn 1. Listen to supervisors 2. Keep lunchroom clean 3. Clean up after yourself 4. Do not waste food 1. Wash hands appropriately 2. Always walk 3. Be aware of others
Gym Locker Room 1. Follow all rules 2. Practice sportsmanship 3. Encourage and be patient with others 4. Respect others property and privacy 1. Dress appropriately for activity 2. Take care of and return equipment 3. Place litter in garbage cans 4. Report bullying and unsafe acts immediately 1. Report unsafe equipment 2. Model and use safe practices 3. Report injuries 4. Be aware of others and your surroundings
Assemblies 1. Use inside voice at all times 2. Listen to speaker(s) and adults 3. Keep hands and feet to self 4. Respond politely 1. Be kind to those around you 2. Listen attentively 3. Respond appropriately 1. Enter and exit gym and bleachers safely 2. Listen to instructions
Classrooms, Library, Computer Lab 1. Participate in a positive manner 2. Be open-minded 3. Use appropriate language 4. Raise your hand to speak 5. Respect school property 6. Respect adults, peers, and yourself 1. Accept your personal best 2. Advocate for yourself 3. Accept consequences for your actions 4. Help and encourage others 5. Come prepared for class 6. Use and return classroom equipment responsibly 7. Arrive to class on time 1. Keep hands and feet to yourself 2. Use furniture appropriately 3. Walk at all times 4. Remain seated unless granted permission
Restrooms 1. Respect Privacy 2. Use quiet voices 3. Respect Property 1. Clean up after yourself 2. Do not waste time 3. Return to class promptly 1. Wash hands with soap and water 2. Report problems or accidents
MATRIX SAMPLE
30
Freedom Middle School Lunchroom Guidelines Lesson
Plan
Goal Students will be responsible, respectful, and safe in the lunchroom area. Teacher Input Student Input Materials List
Universal Expectations 1. Be Responsible 2. Be Safe 3. Be Respectful Objectives The students will 1. be able to demonstrate appropriate behavior in the lunchroom. Set Induction Show video tape of lunchroom movement and behavior at Freedom Middle School 2. Pause the video throughout to discuss appropriate and inappropriate behaviors 3. Small group Ask the students to discuss other issues not seen in the video and how they have handled different situations in the lunchroom. 4. Class Discussion Share the ideas discussed in the small groups 5. Put matrix up on ELMO and discuss expectations for the lunchroom area Closure Review the matrix poster. 1. Ask the students to share personal experiences and/or what they have seen and heard in the lunchroom 2. Small Group Discussion What small changes can you personally make to create a more inviting and safe lunchroom? 3. Orally summarize the lunchroom expectations as they correlate to the school universal expectations. 1. Video of lunchroom movement/behavior 2. Lunchroom matrix 3. ELMO to show matrix to class
Universal Expectations 1. Be Responsible 2. Be Safe 3. Be Respectful Objectives The students will 1. be able to demonstrate appropriate behavior in the lunchroom. Set Induction Show video tape of lunchroom movement and behavior at Freedom Middle School 2. Pause the video throughout to discuss appropriate and inappropriate behaviors 3. Small group Ask the students to discuss other issues not seen in the video and how they have handled different situations in the lunchroom. 4. Class Discussion Share the ideas discussed in the small groups 5. Put matrix up on ELMO and discuss expectations for the lunchroom area Closure Review the matrix poster. 1. Ask the students to share personal experiences and/or what they have seen and heard in the lunchroom 2. Small Group Discussion What small changes can you personally make to create a more inviting and safe lunchroom? 3. Orally summarize the lunchroom expectations as they correlate to the school universal expectations. Reflection
Universal Expectations 1. Be Responsible 2. Be Safe 3. Be Respectful Objectives The students will 1. be able to demonstrate appropriate behavior in the lunchroom. Set Induction Show video tape of lunchroom movement and behavior at Freedom Middle School 2. Pause the video throughout to discuss appropriate and inappropriate behaviors 3. Small group Ask the students to discuss other issues not seen in the video and how they have handled different situations in the lunchroom. 4. Class Discussion Share the ideas discussed in the small groups 5. Put matrix up on ELMO and discuss expectations for the lunchroom area Closure Review the matrix poster. 1. Ask the students to share personal experiences and/or what they have seen and heard in the lunchroom 2. Small Group Discussion What small changes can you personally make to create a more inviting and safe lunchroom? 3. Orally summarize the lunchroom expectations as they correlate to the school universal expectations. Records Teacher ______________ Class ________________ Date Taught __________ Date Modeled _________
UNIVERSAL C UR R ICULUM
All students receive the same behavioral
curriculum/expectations
31
Freedom Middle School
LUNCHROOM EXPECTATIONS Your IRISH Best is RRS!
  • Be Respectful
  • Offer others a place to sit
  • Use inside voice
  • Sit properly at table
  • Eat your own food
  • Wait for your turn

SAMPLE POSTER
GOAL
41 POSITIVE REINFORCEMENT
Be Responsible 1. Listen to supervisors 2. Keep
lunchroom clean 3. Clean up after yourself 4. Do
not waste food
MODEL
Be Safe 1. Wash hands appropriately 2. Always
walk 3. Be aware of others
32
2014-2015 FMS Infraction Slip Sample
  • FMS Honor Level Infraction Slip
  • Student _________________________________________
    ________ Grade ________
  • Teacher _________________________________________
    __ Date _________ Time _________
  • Location ___ classroom ___ hallway ___ library
    ___ restroom ___ outside ___ lunch room ___ gym
  • Others Involved ___ none ___ staff ___
    teacher ___ unknown ___ Peers
    (_________________________________)
  • Motivation ___ obtain peer attention ___
    avoid task/activity ___ dont know ___ avoid
    peer
  • ___ obtain adult attention
    ___ avoid adult ___ obtain
    item/activity
  • 1 point Minor Infractions
  • A. Arrive to school and class on time
  • B. Come prepared to class (including agenda)
  • C. Return materials from home
  • 3 point Moderate Infractions
  • D. Move and act in a safe and orderly manner
    while on campus
  • E. Follow directions and school and classroom
    rules
  • 5 point Moderate Infractions
  • F. Use appropriate language

Comments
33
FMS RtI Behavior Reward System
STARRS CARD ___________________________ (Studen
t Name) S Students T Truly A Are R
Respectful R Responsible S Safe KEEP UP
THE GREAT WORK!!!!
You are being recognized for setting a positive
example for other students at Freedom Middle
School!!
34
Your IRISH Best is RRS Respectful Responsible
Safe
35
FREEDOM AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT RESPONSE TO
INTERVENTION (RtI) PROGRAMS PARENT/GUARDIAN QUE
STIONS???? Thank you for attending this
evening!!!
View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

FREEDOM AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT

Description:

Title: Slide 1 Author: kkilstofte Last modified by: kkilstofte Created Date: 3/21/2014 1:28:32 PM Document presentation format: On-screen Show (4:3) – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:18
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 36
Provided by: kki51
Learn more at: http://www.freedomschools.k12.wi.us
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: FREEDOM AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT


1
FREEDOM AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT 2013-2014 Response
to Intervention (RtI)
Academic Response to Intervention
(RtI) Behavioral Response to Intervention (RtI)
(Positive Behavior Support - PBS)
Parent/Guardian Presentation March 31, 2014
2
FASD Goals Align to DPI Expectations
Accountability Reform 2011-12 to 2013-14
RtI Implementation (Dec. 1, 2013)
Smarter Balanced Assessment 2014-15 (LA/Math)
Common Core State Standards Since 2010
Student Information System 2012-17
Educator Effectiveness 2014-15
3
FREEDOM GRADUATE
College and Career Ready
CRITICAL THINKING
1. What do we want all students to learn or
be able to do?
  • 2. How will we know when each student
  • has learned it?

ENGAGED
SKILLED
Curriculum WI Model Academic Standards
Common Core Standards (CCSS)
Disciplinary
Literacy Next Generation Science Standards
(NGSS) PBS (Behavioral RtI)  Literacy
Reading Speaking Financial Writing
Listening Digital  Lifetime
Health/Wellness  Quality Universal
Instruction  Differentiated Instruction  Quadran
t D Lessons
 Assessment Formative Assessments
Summative Assessments STAR Enterprise
Assessments - Universal Screener -
Diagnostic Screener Performance/Project-Based
Assessments RRR - Quadrant D
Assessments Smarter Balanced
Assessments WKCE/ACT Aspire/ACT/ACT
WorkKeys  21st Century Skills Technology
Tools Creativity 11 Computing / BYOD
Independent Thinking/Learning  Options
Engagement Virtual/Online Classes
Project/Process Based Learning Flipped
Classrooms
CULTURALLY AWARE
INDUSTRIOUS
PRINCIPLED
TOOLS OF TECHNOLOGY
UNIVERSAL DATA
3. How will we respond when a student
experiences difficulty in learning or needs
acceleration?
 Response to Intervention (RtI)  Gifted
and Talented Program  Parental
Involvement  Differentiated and Tiered
Instruction
4
WHAT IS RESPONSE TO INTERVENTION (RtI)???
RtI stands for Response to Intervention. RtI
is a process for achieving higher levels of
academic and behavioral success for all students
through high quality instruction, continuous
review of student progress, and collaboration.
Why are schools and districts interested in RtI?
Schools and districts are interested in higher
levels of student success in academics and
behavior, areas in which RtI shows a great deal
of promise. RtI results in improved outcomes, in
part, because it is focused on setting goals and
measuring progress toward those goals.
http//www.wisconsinrticenter.org/home.html
5
Discrepancy Model-vs-Response to Intervention
Brief Background - (SLD Law)
  • IQ scores vs. achievement scores.
  • Does not help students who have low scores on
    both assessments.
  • Students who missed basic reading skills can also
    present a discrepancy.
  • Students have to fail before they are qualified.

Essentially In the past, guidelines suggested
that schools wait for students to fail before
truly intervening and/or intervention took
place. RtI is very different.
6
GENERAL RtI PRACTICES..
School-Wide Screening (September, January,
May) The school gives all students a screening
test usually three times each year so that
teachers and staff will know which students need
extra help with academic work or
behavior. Progress Monitoring For students
needing extra help, school staff members
frequently (for example, at least once every
week) check the progress of each child to see
what changes, if any, need to be made in the
instruction. Tiered Instruction Within the RtI
structure are several tiers, or levels, of
instruction. General education is referred to as
Tier 1. Additional tiers, usually two or three,
use increasingly intense levels of instruction
(for example, smaller groups, more time, more
progress monitoring). High-Quality,
Research-Based Instruction and Interventions All
school staff members use instructional methods
and materials that have been proven to work
effectively. Collaboration Among School Staff
Members School staff members (including the
principal, general education teachers, special
education teachers, reading specialists, and
school psychologists) work together to help each
child be successful. Fidelity of
Implementation School staff members make sure
that instructional materials and methods are used
exactly as intended.
7
School-wide Screening (UNIVERSAL SCREENING (K-12)
(September, January, May)
STAR Enterprise Math/Reading STAR Early
Literacy
8
School-wide Screening (UNIVERSAL SCREENING (K-12)
(September, January, May)
Percentile Rank
GP Grade Placement SS Scaled Score GE
Grade Equivalent PR Percentile Rank NCE Norm
Curve Equivalent IRL
Instructional Reading Level ORF Est.
Oral Reading Fluency
Text Selection Levels ZPD Zone of Proximal
Development ATOS2000 Scaled Reading
Score (similar to Lexile Levels) ZPD2000 ZPD
converted to ATOS
9
School-wide Screening (Universal Screening K-12)
1
Tier III
5-10
Students Needing Intervention
Tier II
85-95
Tier I
Non-Intervention Students Quality
Instruction Differentiation Enrichment
Universal Quality Curriculum ALL Students
10
RtI Groups 5-10 of student population will
begin Tier II Intervention based on data (Math
and/or Reading) Parent Letter seeking
approval for individual interventions. Begin
specific documentation logs for each child
(Progress Monitoring). Small group
intervention (students not pulled from
universal curriculum for intervention). SIT
processes used to share data/progress.
Enrichment/Guided Study/GT/Etc. Groups (During
RtI Time) 90-95 of student population will
receive enrichment and/or guided study type
opportunities. Various samples of these
opportunities on the next few pages.. (K-12).
11
ACTIVITIES FOR STUDENTS NOT NEEDING DIRECT
INTERVENTION
Enrichment, Guided Study, GT Opportunities, etc.
KINDERGARTEN (Reading) Recess News interactive
writing, recounting events of recess Compound
words creation, matching and drawing their
own Short vowel activities Booklet creation for
example (What I Wear in the Snow) for independent
writing Mad libs to discuss nouns, verbs,
adjectives, etc Story comparisons Extending
thematic ideas with other stories   KINDERGARTEN
(Math) Math Expressions Differentiated
Instruction activities Using manipulatives to
represent a number Finding partners of
numbers Using linking cubes for addition and
subtraction equations SmartBoard activities on
Math Expressions itools (MegaMath Games) Making
teen numbers with a group of 10 and left over
ones Rolling two dice, adding the numbers
together, finding sums Students writing their own
math story problems Students drawing pictures to
match a math story problem Comparing two numbers
to determine greater/less
GRADE 1 (Reading) Readers Theatre Sight
Words Word Family Bingo Making words Writing Short
/long vowel activities Author studies   GRADE 1
(Math) Math Expressions On Level activities and
Quick Practices SmartBoard Activities ABCya.com
games in math Writing math fables Individual
journaling to solve and explain math problems
12
Enrichment, Guided Study, GT Opportunities,
etc. (Continued.)
GRADE 2 (Reading) SmartBoard /web activities in
reading Ipads to enhance understanding of current
concepts Readers Theatre Scholastic News
Bulletins Sight word activities Games (Word
Bingo) Partner Reading Read Books out loud GRADE
2 (Math) Math Expressions Differentiated
curriculum Math manipulatives (clocks, connecting
cubes, measuring tools, money/coins) Daily
routine from Math Expressions to increase number
sense Math journaling to increase student ability
to explain and think through writing SmartBoard/we
b activities in Math Ipads to enhance student
understanding of current concepts
GRADE 3 (Reading) Readers Theatre National
Geographic activities Scholastic News and skill
sheets (CAFÉ review) CAFÉ skills reviewed and
practices inference, word attack,
comprehension, etc. Shared reading
activities Reading white board games
fact/opinion GRADE 3 (Math) Math Expressions
Differentiated Instruction Cards and Tier 1
Lessons Math Expressions Challenge Activities on
the website Brain Games Math Enrichment
activities Math Games addition, subtraction,
multiplication, division, problem solving, tan
grams Supportive challenge math work sheets
13
Enrichment, Guided Study, GT Opportunities,
etc. (Continued.)
GRADE 4 (Reading) Readers Theatre Leveled
reading passages at a higher level, to challenge
students Classroom novels Writing complete
questions, story elements, and understanding
vocabulary Project assessment Novels on
tape GRADE 4 (Math) Math Expressions Challenge
Activities Use Ipads for math word problems Math
Games Thematic units of study (an example 2014
Olympics)
GRADE 5 (Reading) Creating Newspapers, and proof
read and read to others Current events in
Newspapers Present news articles in class for
public speaking Summary of what students read Use
of eye contact, voice, and be articulate in
presentations Scholastic News Comprehension Debate
questions from Scholastic News Life Saver
Writing - students create an argument in writing
with support Writing to present details,
transition and discussions GRADE 5 (Math) Math
Expressions reviewing previous days lessons in
a game style approach Math Expressions Anytime
Problems and Quick Time Problems Math Expressions
Differentiated Cards for RtI
14
Enrichment, Guided Study, GT Opportunities,
etc. (Continued.)
Gifted and Talented Intervention Time
Activities (Grades 1-5)   1st Grade Read
Sideways Stories from Wayside School, discussed
favorite teachers, typed a word
document on that teacher.   2nd Grade Read
Wayside School, created a newspaper on the
computer using a template,
formed/shared opinions in the newspaper.   3rd
Grade Same as 2nd plus started reading Pinballs,
working on creating a document on the
Computer.   4th Grade Read Matilda, did
a project of their choosing (using Bloom's)
Starting reading Holes,
created a newspaper article on the computer, made
a brochure (using a computer
template) on Holes.   5th Grade Read Matilda,
did a project of their choosing (using Bloom's)
Starting reading Holes,
created a newspaper article on the computer, made
a brochure (using a computer
template) on Holes.
15
Enrichment, Guided Study, GT Opportunities,
etc. (Continued.)
Freedom Middle School (Non-Intervention
Activities) 6th Grade Guided Study
A. A very structured study hall
1. Review Grades in computer,
check for missing/late assignments, etc.
2. Opportunity for make-up
work, extra assistance, organization skills,
etc. 7th Grade Guided Study
A. A very structured study hall
1. Review Grades in computer, check
for missing/late assignments, etc.
2. Opportunity for make-up work,
extra assistance, organization skills, etc. 8th
Grade Guided Study A. A
very structured study hall
1. Review Grades in computer, check for
missing/late assignments, etc.
2. Opportunity for make-up work, extra
assistance, organization skills, etc. Gifted and
Talented Intervention Time Activities (Grades
6-8) 6th Grade eCybermission (online
science/math based competition) studying health
and nutrition. 7/8th Grade They meet together
Spread the Word to End the Word awareness week,
creating posters,
ordering shirts, contacting administration,
writing announcements,
collaborating, etc. Freedom High School
(Non-Intervention Activities) Grades 9-12
Guided Study A. A very
structured study hall
1. Review Grades in computer, check for
missing/late assignments, etc.
2. Opportunity for make-up work,
extra assistance in subject areas, organization
skills, etc.
16
Sept. / Jan. / May ()
Progress Monitoring
Tier II
STAR Enterprise Math/Reading /STAR Early Literacy
5-10
School-wide Screening The school gives all
students a screening test usually three times
each year so that teachers and staff will know
which students need extra help with academic work
or behavior. Progress Monitoring For students
needing extra help, school staff members
frequently (for example, at least once every
week) check the progress of each child to see
what changes, if any, need to be made in the
instruction. Tiered Instruction Within the RTI
structure are several tiers, or levels, of
instruction. General education is referred to as
Tier 1. Additional tiers, usually two or three,
use increasingly intense levels of instruction
(for example, smaller groups, more time, more
progress monitoring). High-Quality,
Research-Based Instruction and Interventions All
school staff members use instructional methods
and materials that have been proven to work
effectively. Collaboration Among School Staff
Members School staff members (including the
principal, general education teachers, special
education teachers, reading specialists, and
school psychologists) work together to help each
child be successful. Fidelity of
Implementation School staff members make sure
that instructional materials and methods are used
exactly as intended.
RtI Interventions Tier II
17
Response to Intervention (RtI)
Tiered Instruction
Academic Behavioral Flowchart
UNIVERSAL INSTRUCTIONAL OPTIONS-TIER I General
Curriculum Taught and Assessed Classroom and/or
Common Assessments and/or Universal Screeners
measure progress Implement best teaching
practice, differentiation, accommodations, and
modifications Contact parent/guardian regarding
student progress Speed Referral Track for
urgent issues
Tier I
Instruction Successful Continue Monitor in
General Curriculum
General Instruction Unsuccessful Proceed to
Selected Options-Tier II
Speed Referral
SELECTED OPTIONS-TIER II First Intervention Interv
entions are formulated and implemented by
classroom teacher and/or in collaboration with
grade level/content team members Monitor
intervention for 4 weeks using a minimum of pre,
mid and post assessments. Document progress using
student tracking form. Contact parent/guardian
regarding interventions and student progress
Speed Referral Track for urgent issues
Tier II
Interventions Unsuccessful Proceed to
second intervention
Interventions Successful Continue Monitor
Progress
SELECTED OPTIONS-TIER II Second
Intervention Interventions are formulated and
implemented by classroom teacher and/or in
collaboration with grade level/content team
members Interventions need to be more intense and
increased frequency or length of meetings Team
members share ongoing results with each other and
get feedback and input from team Continue or
revise classroom intervention(s) after 4 weeks .
Contact parent/guardian regarding interventions
and student progress

Interventions Unsuccessful Proceed
to Tier III
Interventions Successful Continue Monitor
Progress
TARGETED OPTIONS-TIER III Collaborate and develop
interventions with grade level and appropriate
Resource team members. Interventions need to be
more intense with increased frequency or length
of meetings and groups of 1-2 students. Implement
and/or revise interventions for 8 weeks Involve
parent/guardian regarding interventions and
student progress.
Tier III
Interventions Successful Continue Monitor
Progress
Interventions Unsuccessful Submit all information
to SIT
18
How can a school restructure to support RtI?
The school can organize its intervention efforts
into 3 levels, or Tiers, that represent a
continuum of increasing intensity of support.
(Kovaleski, 2003 Vaughn, 2003). Tier I is the
lowest level of intervention and Tier III is the
most intensive intervention level.
Universal intervention Available to all
students Example Additional classroom literacy
instruction, differentiation, etc.
Tier I
Individualized Intervention Students who need
additional support than peers are given
individual intervention plans. Example Small
Group Intervention
Tier II
Intensive Intervention Students whose
intervention needs are greater than general
education can meet may be referred for more
intensive services. Example 11 Intervention
Tier III
19
Other Academic Reports STAR Enterprise/STAR
Early Literacy
20
Other Academic Reports STAR Enterprise/STAR
Early Literacy
Student Growth Percentile (SGP) 35-65 (1-99)
Comparison to National Peers
21
Other Academic Reports STAR Enterprise/STAR
Early Literacy
  • GOAL
  • High Growth
  • High Proficiency

22
Other Academic Reports STAR Enterprise/STAR
Early Literacy
23
GENERAL RtI PRACTICES..
School-Wide Screening (PALS, RR, STAR Enterprise
Math/Reading, STAR Early Literacy, etc.) The
school gives all students a screening test
usually three times each year so that teachers
and staff will know which students need extra
help with academic work or behavior. Progress
Monitoring (STAR, CBMs, Formative Assessments,
etc.) For students needing extra help, school
staff members frequently (for example, at least
once every week) check the progress of each child
to see what changes, if any, need to be made in
the instruction. Tiered Instruction (ie Tier I,
Tier II, Tier III) Within the RtI structure are
several tiers, or levels, of instruction. General
education is referred to as Tier 1. Additional
tiers, usually two or three, use increasingly
intense levels of instruction (for example,
smaller groups, more time, more progress
monitoring). High-Quality, Research-Based
Instruction and Interventions All school staff
members use instructional methods and materials
that have been proven to work effectively. (ie
Wisconsin Academic Standards, Common Core State
Standards (Math/Language Arts), Daily 5, CAFÉ,
Math Expressions, LLI Kits, Guided Reading,
Teacher Effectiveness Model, etc.)
Collaboration Among School Staff Members School
staff members (including the principal, general
education teachers, special education teachers,
reading specialists, and school psychologists)
work together to help each child be successful.
(ie Common Planning time increased at FES,
Student Intervention Teams (SIT) Formed and SIT
Processes Developed and Implemented, etc.)
Fidelity of Implementation School staff members
make sure that instructional materials and
methods are used exactly as intended.
(Continually Ongoing Process)
24
BEHAVIORAL RtI Positive Behavioral Support
(PBS)
Your IRISH Best is RRS Respectful Responsible
Safe
25
BEHAVIORAL RtI POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORTS (PBS)
BENEFITS 1. Reduction of unnecessary
disciplinary referrals. 2. Increased staff
coordination and consistency when dealing
with severe behaviors. 3. Improved school
climate. 4. Enhanced school safety. 5. Improved
staff communication and coordination when
managing student behavior. 6. Increased positive
interactions between staff and students. 7.
Improved staff skills in effective supervision
and positive behavior support. 8. Use of
data-based decision making regarding behavior and
discipline practices. (Sprick,
Garrison, Howard, 2002) Foundations, Safe
Civil Schools Series
26
BEHAVIORAL RtI POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORTS (PBS)
  • BACKGROUND RESEARCH - RtI BEHAVIORAL FRAMEWORK
  • Randy Sprick, et al. Foundations Program
  • Chris Weber, et al. Pyramid of Behavior
    Interventions (PLC work)
  • George Sugai, et al. PBIS Model (University of
    Oregon, etc.)
  • Freedom Area School District Model was derived
    from these
  • three models.

Providing integrated support through both
academic and behavior RtI models produce
larger gains in both outcomes than relying on a
single model in isolation. (Lane Menzies,
2003) Education and Treatment of Children RtI
(behavior) programs reduce the inappropriate
referrals of students for special education
services, and it increases student engagement
along with improving the overall numbers of
students achieving grade level standards.

(M. Burns, 2008) Principal
Leadership

27
ULTIMATE QUESTION????????
  • Were a students academic struggles caused by
    their frequent non-compliant behaviors, or were
    their frequent non-compliant behaviors a result
    of their academic frustration?

ACADEMIC CHALLENGES OR BEHAVIORAL
CHALLENGES????? A SCHOOL MUST ADDRESS BOTH
VARIBLES TO HELP ALL CHILDREN SUCCEED
28
ACADEMIC BEHAVIORAL RtI COMPARISON
RtI Academic
Tier I A. Universal Academic Curriculum (All subjects) B. Universal Screening (STAR) Tier II A. RtI/Enrichment/Guided Study 1. Diagnostic measures 2. Small Group Intervention 3. Progress Monitoring/ Data Tracking 4. Specific duration/intensity Tier III A. Individualized intervention 1. Intensity/ Duration 2. Progress Monitoring/Data Tracking
RtI Behavior
Tier I A. Universal Behavior Lessons (All common areas) B. Universal Screening 1. Past/Current behavior data/surveys/etc. Tier II A. RtI/Enrichment/Guided Study 1. Re-teach behavior lessons (individual/small group) 2. Individual Behavior Plan (IBP) (Progress Monitoring/Data Tracking) 4. Specific duration/intensity Tier III A. Individualized intervention 1. Intensity/ Duration 2. FBA (Progress Monitoring/ Data Tracking
29
Freedom Middle School Your IRISH Best is RRS Freedom Middle School Your IRISH Best is RRS Freedom Middle School Your IRISH Best is RRS Freedom Middle School Your IRISH Best is RRS
Common Area Be Respectful Be Responsible Be Safe
All Settings 1. Dress, speak, and act appropriately 2. Be considerate of others 3. Always use good manners 4. Settle conflicts appropriately 1. Be prepared at all times 2.Help keep school clear of debris and litter 3. Arrive to school on time 4. Return materials from home 1. Follow all school rules, directions, and expectations 2. Move safely 3. Listen to instructions 4. Be aware of others around you
Hallways, Stairs, Entryway 1.Talk quietly 2. Be polite to others 3. Respect other people and their possessions 4. Wait your turn 1.Come in right away when the bell rings 2. Wipe your feet 3. Keep lockers neat and organized 4. Keep hallways clean 1. Walk (especially stairs) 2. Keep your hands and feet to yourself 3. Walk on right side 4. Be aware of others at lockers
Lunchroom 1. Offer others a place to sit 2. Use inside voice 3. Sit properly at table 4. Eat your own food 5. Wait for your turn 1. Listen to supervisors 2. Keep lunchroom clean 3. Clean up after yourself 4. Do not waste food 1. Wash hands appropriately 2. Always walk 3. Be aware of others
Gym Locker Room 1. Follow all rules 2. Practice sportsmanship 3. Encourage and be patient with others 4. Respect others property and privacy 1. Dress appropriately for activity 2. Take care of and return equipment 3. Place litter in garbage cans 4. Report bullying and unsafe acts immediately 1. Report unsafe equipment 2. Model and use safe practices 3. Report injuries 4. Be aware of others and your surroundings
Assemblies 1. Use inside voice at all times 2. Listen to speaker(s) and adults 3. Keep hands and feet to self 4. Respond politely 1. Be kind to those around you 2. Listen attentively 3. Respond appropriately 1. Enter and exit gym and bleachers safely 2. Listen to instructions
Classrooms, Library, Computer Lab 1. Participate in a positive manner 2. Be open-minded 3. Use appropriate language 4. Raise your hand to speak 5. Respect school property 6. Respect adults, peers, and yourself 1. Accept your personal best 2. Advocate for yourself 3. Accept consequences for your actions 4. Help and encourage others 5. Come prepared for class 6. Use and return classroom equipment responsibly 7. Arrive to class on time 1. Keep hands and feet to yourself 2. Use furniture appropriately 3. Walk at all times 4. Remain seated unless granted permission
Restrooms 1. Respect Privacy 2. Use quiet voices 3. Respect Property 1. Clean up after yourself 2. Do not waste time 3. Return to class promptly 1. Wash hands with soap and water 2. Report problems or accidents
MATRIX SAMPLE
30
Freedom Middle School Lunchroom Guidelines Lesson
Plan
Goal Students will be responsible, respectful, and safe in the lunchroom area. Teacher Input Student Input Materials List
Universal Expectations 1. Be Responsible 2. Be Safe 3. Be Respectful Objectives The students will 1. be able to demonstrate appropriate behavior in the lunchroom. Set Induction Show video tape of lunchroom movement and behavior at Freedom Middle School 2. Pause the video throughout to discuss appropriate and inappropriate behaviors 3. Small group Ask the students to discuss other issues not seen in the video and how they have handled different situations in the lunchroom. 4. Class Discussion Share the ideas discussed in the small groups 5. Put matrix up on ELMO and discuss expectations for the lunchroom area Closure Review the matrix poster. 1. Ask the students to share personal experiences and/or what they have seen and heard in the lunchroom 2. Small Group Discussion What small changes can you personally make to create a more inviting and safe lunchroom? 3. Orally summarize the lunchroom expectations as they correlate to the school universal expectations. 1. Video of lunchroom movement/behavior 2. Lunchroom matrix 3. ELMO to show matrix to class
Universal Expectations 1. Be Responsible 2. Be Safe 3. Be Respectful Objectives The students will 1. be able to demonstrate appropriate behavior in the lunchroom. Set Induction Show video tape of lunchroom movement and behavior at Freedom Middle School 2. Pause the video throughout to discuss appropriate and inappropriate behaviors 3. Small group Ask the students to discuss other issues not seen in the video and how they have handled different situations in the lunchroom. 4. Class Discussion Share the ideas discussed in the small groups 5. Put matrix up on ELMO and discuss expectations for the lunchroom area Closure Review the matrix poster. 1. Ask the students to share personal experiences and/or what they have seen and heard in the lunchroom 2. Small Group Discussion What small changes can you personally make to create a more inviting and safe lunchroom? 3. Orally summarize the lunchroom expectations as they correlate to the school universal expectations. Reflection
Universal Expectations 1. Be Responsible 2. Be Safe 3. Be Respectful Objectives The students will 1. be able to demonstrate appropriate behavior in the lunchroom. Set Induction Show video tape of lunchroom movement and behavior at Freedom Middle School 2. Pause the video throughout to discuss appropriate and inappropriate behaviors 3. Small group Ask the students to discuss other issues not seen in the video and how they have handled different situations in the lunchroom. 4. Class Discussion Share the ideas discussed in the small groups 5. Put matrix up on ELMO and discuss expectations for the lunchroom area Closure Review the matrix poster. 1. Ask the students to share personal experiences and/or what they have seen and heard in the lunchroom 2. Small Group Discussion What small changes can you personally make to create a more inviting and safe lunchroom? 3. Orally summarize the lunchroom expectations as they correlate to the school universal expectations. Records Teacher ______________ Class ________________ Date Taught __________ Date Modeled _________
UNIVERSAL C UR R ICULUM
All students receive the same behavioral
curriculum/expectations
31
Freedom Middle School
LUNCHROOM EXPECTATIONS Your IRISH Best is RRS!
  • Be Respectful
  • Offer others a place to sit
  • Use inside voice
  • Sit properly at table
  • Eat your own food
  • Wait for your turn

SAMPLE POSTER
GOAL
41 POSITIVE REINFORCEMENT
Be Responsible 1. Listen to supervisors 2. Keep
lunchroom clean 3. Clean up after yourself 4. Do
not waste food
MODEL
Be Safe 1. Wash hands appropriately 2. Always
walk 3. Be aware of others
32
2014-2015 FMS Infraction Slip Sample
  • FMS Honor Level Infraction Slip
  • Student _________________________________________
    ________ Grade ________
  • Teacher _________________________________________
    __ Date _________ Time _________
  • Location ___ classroom ___ hallway ___ library
    ___ restroom ___ outside ___ lunch room ___ gym
  • Others Involved ___ none ___ staff ___
    teacher ___ unknown ___ Peers
    (_________________________________)
  • Motivation ___ obtain peer attention ___
    avoid task/activity ___ dont know ___ avoid
    peer
  • ___ obtain adult attention
    ___ avoid adult ___ obtain
    item/activity
  • 1 point Minor Infractions
  • A. Arrive to school and class on time
  • B. Come prepared to class (including agenda)
  • C. Return materials from home
  • 3 point Moderate Infractions
  • D. Move and act in a safe and orderly manner
    while on campus
  • E. Follow directions and school and classroom
    rules
  • 5 point Moderate Infractions
  • F. Use appropriate language

Comments
33
FMS RtI Behavior Reward System
STARRS CARD ___________________________ (Studen
t Name) S Students T Truly A Are R
Respectful R Responsible S Safe KEEP UP
THE GREAT WORK!!!!
You are being recognized for setting a positive
example for other students at Freedom Middle
School!!
34
Your IRISH Best is RRS Respectful Responsible
Safe
35
FREEDOM AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT RESPONSE TO
INTERVENTION (RtI) PROGRAMS PARENT/GUARDIAN QUE
STIONS???? Thank you for attending this
evening!!!
About PowerShow.com