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Age of Jackson

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Age of Jackson Chapter 10 Election of 1824 Election of 1824 Democracy Expands What does democracy expands mean? In the 1700s government was managed and ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Age of Jackson


1
Age of Jackson
  • Chapter 10

2
Election of 1824
John Quincy Adams vs. Andrew Jackson
3
Election of 1824
4
Democracy Expands
  • What does democracy expands mean?
  • In the 1700s government was managed and
    controlled by wealthy male property owners
  • Why does it matter who manages or controls the
    government?
  • This imbalance of power alienated the majority of
    Americans

5
Results
  • States change voting qualifications
  • Allows more white men to vote. How?
  • Freed blacks are still denied this right.
  • Creation of nominating conventions which allows
    the members of the party to nominate its
    candidates.
  • This time period is known as Jacksonian Democracy

6
Election of 1828
  • Rematch of the 1824 Election
  • The Democratic-Republican party splits
  • Democratic Party ? Jackson
  • National Republican Party ? John Q. Adams

7
Election of 1828
  • Jackson
  • War hero
  • Man of the people
  • Bad temper
  • Crude and unrefined
  • Adams
  • Experienced
  • Son of John Adams
  • Harvard educated
  • Out of touch with the common man
  • Not very charismatic

8
Election of 1828
9
Jacksons Administration
  • Spoils System
  • Vice President ? John C. Calhoun
  • From South Carolina
  • Secretary of State ? Martin Van Buren
  • From New York
  • Kitchen Cabinet ? predecessor of the modern white
    house staff

10
Sectionalism Increases
  • By this time the United States has divided itself
  • Three distinct parts
  • The South
  • The North
  • The West

11
The North
  • Economy based on
  • Trade
  • Manufacturing
  • Supported Tariffs
  • Why?
  • Opposed the sale of public lands for low prices

12
The South
  • Economy based on agriculture
  • Most dependent on cash crops
  • Cotton
  • Tobacco
  • Against Tariffs
  • Why?
  • Relied heavily on slavery

13
The West
  • Was an emerging economy
  • People in the West where concerned with 2 things
  • Cheap land
  • Internal improvements

14
Tariff of Abominations
  • A high tariff on imports
  • Passed by congress before Andrew Jackson took
    office
  • This causes sectionalism to increase
  • Why?

15
Nullification Crisis
  • Many of the southern economies suffered because
    of the tariff
  • South Carolina in particular suffered because of
    tariffs
  • John C. Calhoun will take the side of the
    southern states

16
States Rights Doctrine
  • Calhoun writes the South Carolina Exposition and
    Protest
  • In this document Calhoun argued two things
  • Because the states had formed the national
    government they should be more powerful than the
    national government
  • States had the right to nullify any federal law
    they thought was unconstitutional
  • Calhoun resigns from the Office of the Vice
    President and is replaced by Van Buren

17
Nullification Debate Continues
  • After resigning Calhoun runs for election in the
    Senate and wins
  • Uses this as a platform for arguing in favor of
    the States Rights Doctrine
  • Based on principles established by Madison and
    Jefferson in the Virginia and Kentucky
    Resolutions

18
Hayne vs. Webster
  • Robert Y. Hayne
  • Senator for South Carolina
  • Defends the states rights to nullify federal law
  • Argues that it provides states with a lawful way
    to protest federal laws
  • Daniel Webster
  • Senator from Massachusetts
  • Argues that the Union is one Nation, not a pact
    among independent states
  • Believed that the Nation gt States

19
Jacksons Views
  • Opposed to nullification
  • Urged congress to decrease the tariff
  • South Carolina thought the new tariff was still
    too high

20
South Carolina vs Andrew Jackson
  • Nullification Act
  • Passed by South Carolina
  • Declared that the federal tariffs where null and
    void
  • Threatened to withdraw from the union if federal
    troops where used to enforce the tariff
  • Also voted to form their own army
  • Force Bill
  • Passed by congress
  • Requested by Jackson
  • It allowed the President to use force (army) if
    necessary
  • This causes the other southern states to not
    support South Carolina

21
Compromise
  • Proposed by Henry Clay
  • Will gradually decrease the tariff over a number
    of years
  • Is quickly passed to prevent violent
    confrontation in South Carolina
  • Like the Missouri Compromise before it, this does
    not change the opinions of either side
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