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U.S. Department of Homeland Security

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U.S. Department of Homeland Security APRIL, 2010 * Key Talking Points/Items to remember here: This is the first time many of the participants are hearing that they ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: U.S. Department of Homeland Security


1
U.S. Department of Homeland Security
  • APRIL, 2010

2
Overview
  • The attacks of September 11, 2001, led to the
    largest and most complex reorganization of the
    federal government since the department of
    defense was created over 60 years ago
  • The post 9/11 re-organization included the
    establishment of the U.S. Department of Homeland
    Security (DHS)
  • On March 1, 2003 DHS took over operational
    control of nearly 180,000 employees from incoming
    agencies and offices, including some 60,000 TSA
    employees from the Department of Transportation

3
Who is TSA?
  • TSA Mission, Vision and Core Values
  • The Transportation Security Administration
    protects the Nations transportation systems to
    ensure freedom of movement for people and
    commerce.
  • The Transportation Security Administration will
    continuously set the standard for excellence in
    transportation security through its people,
    processes, and technology.
  • To enhance mission performance and achieve our
    shared goals with Stakeholders and affiliated
    Agencies.

4
Security Programs and Contingency Plans
  • The Department of Homeland Security has rated
    the National Threat Advisory Level as Orange.

5
  • Goals
  • Establish indisputable confidence in our Nations
    transportation system
  • Secure the Nations freedom of movement in the
    interest of national security, public safety and
    economic growth

6
What we do
  • Layers of Security
  • We have layers of security to enhance the
    security of the traveling public and the Nation's
    transportation system. Each one of these layers
    alone is a deterrent, capable of deterring
    criminal acts.
  • In combination their security value is
    multiplied, creating a much stronger, formidable
    system.

7
Regulatory Division
  • Inspection, Compliance and Oversight
  • Airports, Aircraft Operators (passenger and
    cargo), Canine and Surface
  • conduct inspections, investigations, and outreach
    to prevent attacks, share best practices, solve
    problems and ensure compliance
  • 49 Code of Federal Regulation 1540, 1542, 1544,
    1546 and 1548
  • Provide interpretations and clarifications of TSA
    security procedures and requirements
  • Incident response

8
Regulatory Division
  • Monitor threats
  • Provide incident information
  • Make recommendations or implement security
    procedures as appropriate
  • Seek innovative ways to enhance security by
    participating in the evaluation, testing and the
    implementation of new programs
  • Administer legal enforcement actions by means of
    civil penalties

9
Regulatory Division-Cargo
  • 19 CARGO INSPECTORS
  • AIR CARRIERS, TSA APPROVED INDIRECT AIR CARRIERS,
    CERTIFIED CARGO SCREENING FACILITIES
  • PERFORM COMPREHENSIVE AND SUPPLEMENTAL
    INSPECTIONS
  • JFK AREA OF RESPONSIBILITY INCLUDES
  • 78 AIR CARRIERS TO INCLUDE BOTH PASSENGER AND
    ALL CARGO OPERATIONS
  • 662 TSA APPROVED INDIRECT AIR CARRIERS
  • 63 TSA APPROVED CERTIFIED CARGO SCREENING
    FACILITIES

10
Regulatory Division-Cargo
  • Participates in Cargo Strikes which is a
    national effort in airports throughout the US
  • Conducts Special Emphasis Inspections (SEI) or
    tests periodically focusing on a particular
    aspect of a regulated entities operation
  • Participates in Town Hall meetings providing
    updates to industry on changes to regulatory
    programs

11
Certified Cargo Screening Program
  • Non-SSI Presentation

12
100 Screening Requirement
Background
  • President Bush approved Implementing
    Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of
    2007 on August 3, 2007.
  • The legislation mandates 100 screening by August
    2010 and requires TSA to
  • Establish a system to screen 100 of cargo
    transported on passenger aircraft.
  • Provide a level of security commensurate to that
    of passenger baggage.
  • Meet inspection benchmarks.

Congressionally Mandated Cargo Screening
Benchmarks
50
100
9/11 Act
August 2010
February 2009
August 2007
13
100 Screening Requirement
Impacts
  • All cargo must be screened at the piece level by
    TSA-approved methods prior to being loaded on a
    passenger aircraft.
  • Screening capacity at a single point in the
    supply chain is not sufficient enough to
    accomplish this requirement.
  • Significant carrier delays, cargo backlogs, and
    transit time increases are expected.

15 million pounds moves on PAX daily.
Cargo must be broken down to piece level and
screened by piece.
August 2010 100 Screening Required by Congress
14
Piece Level Cargo
  • Piece level cargo is the individual item within a
    shipment. The number of pieces is determined by
    the number of pieces identified by the
    shipper-level documentation.
  • By February 3, 2009, all cargo must be broken
    down and 50 of the individual pieces must be
    screened prior to being loaded on a passenger
    aircraft.
  • By August 3, 2010, cargo must be 100 screened at
    the piece level.

15
Future Air Cargo Supply Chain
In the future, screening responsibility will be
allocated across the supply chain.
Risk Assessment
Freight Forwarder
Screening
Air Carrier
Known Shipper
United States Air Cargo Distribution by Weight
100 Screened
Screening
CCSF Freight Forwarder
Passenger Aircraft 15
All-Cargo Aircraft 85
Screening
CCSF Shipper / 3PL / Manufacturer
Freight Forwarder
Notes Screening must occur prior to
consolidation. Screening methods electronic,
manual, and canine.
16
Certified Cargo Screening Program
17
Certified Cargo Screening Program Overview
The Certified Cargo Screening Program (CCSP) is a
facility based program.
18
What is a regulated entity?
  • A regulated entity is an entity that TSA has
    imposed mandatory requirements on through an
    order, regulation, or other means to impose
    binding and enforceable requirements.
    Regulations are first published in the Federal
    Register and codified in the Code of Federal
    Regulations (CFR).
  • Certified Cargo Screening Facilities (CCSFs) will
    need to be regulated
  • To count CCSF cargo as screened.
  • To enable compliance to be enforced.

19
Who can become a Certified Cargo Screening
Facility?
  • Facilities screening under the CCSP will be known
    as Certified Cargo Screening Facilities (CCSFs).
  • Facilities currently applying to become Certified
    Cargo Screening Facilities
  • Independent facilities may emerge to screen cargo
    for other entities.
  • Any entity with a desire to screen cargo must
    have a secure facility.
  • CCSFs must be no more than one node back from a
    currently regulated entity (freight forwarder/air
    carrier).
  • Facilities that are not currently regulated by
    TSA will become regulated under the program.

Shipping Facilities
Freight Forwarding Facilities
Third Party Logistics Providers
Manufacturing Facilities
Warehouses
Distribution Centers
20
CCSP Standards
21
CCSP Program Standards
  • During Phase One
  • Non-regulated entities will operate under a
    regulatory Order issued by TSA.
  • Freight forwarders and air carriers will operate
    under Alternate Procedures (APs) to their
    standard security programs (SSPs).
  • At full rollout, all CCSFs will operate under the
    Certified Cargo Screening Standard Security
    Program (CCSSSP).

M S P
I A C S S P
A O S S P
O R D E R
F A C A O S S P
Certified Cargo Screening Standard Security
Program
22
Operational Process Flows
  • The diagram below is a conceptual example of a
    general operational process flow at a CCSF.

Shippers Compliance Responsibility
Access Control Area
TSA-approved Chain of Custody
Freight Forwarders Compliance Responsibility
23
CCSP Benefits
  • The benefits of participating in the Certified
    Cargo Screening Program may outweigh costs
    carried by the facility in meeting program
    guidelines.

CCSF Benefits
CCSF Costs
  • CCSP
  • Decreased log jams (carrier delays) and expedited
    supply chain flow.
  • Ability to build bulk configurations.
  • Ability to continue to ship certain cargo types
    without potential invasive screening later on in
    the chain.
  • Implement facility and chain of custody
    standards.
  • Facility audits.

Facility Standards include physical access
controls, personnel, procedural, physical, and
information technology security.
24
Q A
  • Additional questions may be emailed to
    CCSP_at_dhs.gov.

25
Questions?
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