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Chambers of Commerce and Industry Paris/Ile de France

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... Four types of actions One Objective for its Brussels office Our 3 missions Lobbying II.The EU context EU Trade policy Brussels environment Key figures ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Chambers of Commerce and Industry Paris/Ile de France


1
Chambers of Commerce and Industry Paris/Ile de
France
  • Sandra Penning
  • Director EU office
  • 41, avenue des Arts,
  • 1040 Brussels

2
Ile de France Région
11,6 million inhab., 27 French GDP
3
Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Paris
(created in 1803)
  • Represents the interests of 380 990 companies
    (21 of French GDP)
  • 1) 123 313 trade
  • 2) 55 743 industries
  • 3) 201 934 services
  • Staff 4 230 out of which 2 315 people working on
    education and training

4
Four types of actions
  1. Representing company interests to public
    authorities
  2. Advising companies at each stage of their
    development by offering a range of customised
    services
  3. Providing recognised education and training
    responding to market needs
  4. Expanding the Ile de France region attractiveness
    (site management, events)

5
One Objective for its Brussels office
  • To promote and preserve Ile de France Chambers of
    Commerce and Industry interests within a
    constantly changing and increasingly competitive
    European environment

6
Our 3 missions
  • To inform our Chambers about EU developments
    which might or will affect them
  • To influence decision makers at technical and
    political levels
  • To support and assist preparation of projects to
    be submitted for EU funding

7
Lobbying
  1. Definition representation of interests
  2. An operational framework EU context
  3. An individual chambers approach Why and how?
  4. The decision making process in action
  5. Conclusions

8
II.The EU context
  • 80 of the legislation governing the lives of EU
    citizens and companies are initiated in Brussels
    through a decision making process of at least 24
    months.

9
EU Trade policy
  • Pillar of relations between the EU and the rest
    of the world 22 world trade exchanges for 7 of
    world population (a market of 483 million
    consumers)
  • USA our primary trade partner, a total of 14
    million jobs, 7M on both sides of the Atlantic
    depend on these exchanges
  • One single voice to the WTO

10
Brussels environment
  • Triple diplomatic representations (Kingdom of
    Belgium, NATO, EU)
  • 2nd media place after Washington
  • 10,000 representatives of lobbies, 250 regional
    representations, 300 corporate and vocational
    representations

11
Key figures
  • EU annual budget /- 133 billion euros
  • ie 1.1 of EU GDP for the period 2007-2013
    (1.24 for 2000-2006)
  • 42 for CAP and rural issues,
  • 45 for sustainable growth
  • 94 of EU budget covers intra-community
    programmes and initiatives

12
2009 Budget 133.8bn
13
Where does the money come from?
14
The Components Brussels scene the actors
15
(No Transcript)
16
Major current issues
  • The new modified Treaty
  • Common security defense policy
  • The Lisbon strategy (2000-2010), rationalized and
    relaunched in 2005
  • Energy dependency

17
III. An individual Chambers approach WHY? HOW?

18
Why Chambers lobby?
  • To influence draft regulation, to prevent the
    implementation of rules
  • To influence politics to speed up or slow down
    decisions
  • To influence financial priorities

19
The process to anticipate, to prepare
(knowledge-reflection), to react, to persevere
  • Strategy
  • Analysis of actors
  • What objective?
  • On what grounds?
  • In partnership or not
  • Use of the media or not
  • Institutional actors
  • Stakeholders (decisional non-decisional)
  • Society (NGOs)

20
State of play
21
Lobbying on EU issues
  • Brussels a key decision arena
  • High concentration of players
  • Substantial increase in EU competences
  • Continual emergence of new issues
  • Policy of institutional openess
  • Increased influence of the civil society
  • Great variety of actor profiles
  • THE CULTURE OF COMPROMISE

22
The elements of strategy knowledge and networks

23
The method clear concise objectives limited
priorities
24
Decision makers expectations
  • A flexible and understandable proposal
  • The promotion of a general interest
  • Genuinely technical and transferable information

25
How it works
  • The hart of our target
  • Institutional triangle
  • (Commission/PE/Concil)
  • The decision makers
  • The operators
  • The institutional triangle Commission,
    Parliament, Council
  • Interest groups
  • Companies (including the US ones)
  • European associations and professional
    federations (minimum common denominator) but
    strong representativity global vision

26
The operators (continued)
  • Consultants (expertise but many clients)
  • NGO (society interests)
  • Trade Unions (part of the social dialogue)
  • Regions local authorities (thematic networks)
  • Third countries (ACP for AEP , Ivory coast in the
    case of chocolate directive)
  • Think tanks (meeting place, debates)

27
The cycle of lobbying
  • Advance warning and monitoring
  • Information (collection transfer)
  • Internal mobilisation
  • Definition of a position/message
  • Mapping of actors
  • Strategy/Action/Tools
  • Communication
  • Evaluation

Continual adjustment
28
What to decide?
  • Individual action ( the Chamber)
  • Collective action (associations/federations,
    plateforms) (with French Interests local
    authorities, Medef (Tusiad), national
    representation etc
  • Peers Representation (Eurochambres, other
    regional local Chambers)
  • It will depend upon objectives challenges ,
    chances of success

29
Defining the message position paper
  • Who is behind it? Logo
  • What is at stake ? Text of reference
  • Synthesis
  • Arguments put forward
  • Organisation
  • Contact

30
(No Transcript)
31
Proposed Amendment
  • do it yourself for the MEP

32
(No Transcript)
33
(No Transcript)
34
Communiqués de presse
35
Campaigns (ex greenpeace)
Ex de mobilisation GUIDE DU CITOYEN ACTIF POUR
UNE REFORME CHIMIQUE REACH REUSSIE
36
Creativity
  • Create an event
  • Parlement Européen des Entreprises (Eurochambres)

37
The decision making process in action
  • Commission
  • Parliament
  • Council and Permanent representations

38
(No Transcript)
39
The European Commission
  • Ex DG Entreprises
  • 1 Commissioner
  • 1 cabinet
  • http//ec.europa.eu/commission_barroso/verheugen/t
    eam_fr.htm
  • 1 directorate général/DG/chefs dunité/
    administrateurs
  • http//ec.europa.eu/staffdir/plsql/gsys_page.displ
    ay_index?pLangFR
  • the secretary

40
Within the Commission internal adoption
  • Political strategy
  • Green paper
  • Impact assessment
  • Interservice consultation
  • Arbitration at comissioners level
  • Proposal

41
The European Commission
  • The approach
  • To Target the right staff (DG Entr, Trade, Markt)
  • - Within the right timing
  • To adapt the message
  • To establish a lasting relation within the
    services
  • To supply an objective, unbiased and non
    conflictual information
  • Étude de la perception du lobbying par les
  • fonctionnaires de la Commission -
    Burson-Marsteller

42
The European Parliament
43
(No Transcript)
44
Targeting MEPs
  • Rapporteur
  • Shadow rapporteurs
  • Coordinators of political groups
  • Other Meps interested by the subject
    (intergroup), local/regional links.
  • Personal interest / professionnal background
  • The MEPs assistant

45
Characteristics lack of expertise
  • The Parlement is under staffed
  • Limited opportunities to deepen knowledge
  • Lobbying requested!

46
The Council
47
A new weighting for votes
  • 3 voting modes from 1957 unanimity,
  • qualified majority (2/3, coalition of small or
    big states insufficient, over-representation of
    small states), simple majority
  • Within the new Treaty a reduced use of
    unanimity, a new qualified majority (55 of
    Member States, 65 of EU population), simple
    majority

48
The Council of Ministers at various levels
COREPER (I et II)
Working groups
Le SGAE (France)
Ministry
Ministry
Ministry
49
Beyond lobbying
  • Watchdog on regulation policy developments
  • Information
  • - Advocacy
  • - Your Communication / Image
  • Exchange of know how /networking
  • Training on challenges prepared for
    implementation
  • Data on the sector
  • Info on financing
  • Ingeniering of projets

50
Dont do!
  • Corruption,
  • Misleading on represented interests
  • Communicating deliberately inexact information
  • Harrassing including through spamming
  • Obstructing 

51
How to assess effective lobbying
  • Some key elements
  • - The text is modified or not
  • - The budget is increased
  • - Interest raised among members (visibility)
  • - Support from medias
  • Cost savings for the industry (climate
    change/energy package)
  • Recognition from decision makers
  • Implementation of planed actions (adaptability)

52
THANK YOU FOR YOUR ATTENTION
  • An healthy exercice leading to efficiency,
    transparency, visibility, adaptability and better
    competitivity
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