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Analyzing Poetry Week 1

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Title: Literary Techniques: Poetry Analysis 2 Author: kohed Last modified by: Rutherford County Schools Created Date: 4/13/2009 8:31:50 AM Document presentation format – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Analyzing Poetry Week 1


1
Analyzing Poetry Week 1
The poet uses a specific sound device for what
reason?
  • Sound Devices

2
Poem Packet
  • Please take note of the definitions, purposes,
    and examples of each sound device on the NOTES
    PAGE
  • Please label and explain (annotate) NEXT TO the
    poems in your poem packet.

3
Teachers Freeze the next slide on your
projector Students
  1. Read the poem Annabel Lee by Edgar Allan Poe to
    yourself silently.
  2. Then, have your partner read aloud the first
    stanza to you.
  3. Next answer, how did he or she sound while
    reading?
  4. Click Listen, then scroll down.
  5. Finally, listen to a reading of the first and
    last stanzas of poem. How was it different from
    your partners read. What caused that difference?

4
Listen
  • Annabel Lee by Edgar Allan Poe

5
Sound Devices
  • A good poem can often be identified by its sound
    quality.
  • Poets use certain devices to create sound within
    a poem. We need to analyze the poem to look out
    for these devices, indicate the sound produced,
    and evaluate its effect on the reader.
  • How did Annabel Lee effect you?
  • What caused your feelings/mood?

6
1. What do poets use to create sound within a
poem?
  • The sound devices
  • Alliteration - Monday
  • Onomatopoeia - Tuesday
  • Accent / Rhythm - Wednesday
  • Rhyme - Thursday
  • Repetition Thursday
  • Sound Device Assignment worth 100 points on
    Friday

7
2. Purpose of using sound devices
  • sound devices are often used for three main
    reasons
  • To create a rhythm effect to set a mood or
    image.
  • To reveal the speakers attitude
  • To complement or emphasize the message/theme of
    the poem.

8
I. Alliteration
  • Definition - the repetition of the beginning
    consonants in words next to or close to each
    other
  • Purpose To create a rhythm effect to set a
    mood or image.
  • In the following example, the repetition of the
    f sound in the first two lines lends them a
    rhythmic and musical quality

9
Test Question The poet most likely uses
alliteration in this poem to
  • The fair breeze blew, the white foam flew,
  • The furrow followed free
  • We were the first that ever burst
  • Into that silent sea.
  • From The Rime of the Ancient Mariner S. T.
    Coleridge

To produce a rhythmic effect that creates a mood?
What mood? or image? What images? Turn and talk
it out. Moods excited and proud
10
Cynthia in the Snow
  • By Gwendelyn Brooks
  • Test Question The poet most likely uses
    alliteration in this poem to
  • It SUSHES.
  • It hushes
  • The loudness in the road.
  • It flitter-twitters,
  • And laughs away from me.
  • It laughs a lovely whiteness,
  • And whitely whirs away,
  • To be
  • Some otherwhere,
  • Still white as milk or shirts.
  • So beautiful it hurts.
  • To produce a rhythmic effect that creates a mood?
    What mood? or image? What images?
  • Turn and talk it out.
  • Moods light and joyful

11
Test Question The poet most likely uses
alliteration in this poem to
  • April Moods by Rosebud
  • Spring should be a joyful time Filled with
    happiness and flowers Unfortunately, April
    mine Seems to have more clouds and showers. As
    the rain falls from the cloud April showers me
    with pain Hurting then my soul does shroud And on
    down comes the rain. As the rain falls from the
    skies Showers fall upon my face- Teardrops
    running from my eyes Each moving at a different
    pace. Trying to act like I don't care I hold my
    head high through the drizzle But this sorrow I
    can hardly bear And soon those reckless feelings
    fizzle. April soon brings back the sun To chase
    away the rain-gray skies But my dark days are not
    yet done As long as they stay, I will cry.
  • To produce a rhythmic effect
  • that creates a mood? What mood? or image? What
    images?
  • Turn and talk it out.
  • Moods sad and depressed

12
  • Sarah Cynthia Sylvia Stout
  • What rhythmic effect did the alliteration have
    on you as a reader?
  • What mood did the alliteration create?
  • Moods humorous and grossed out ?

13
The Highwayman by Alfred Noyes
  • Listen
  • Alliteration Homework 25 points
  • Reread the poem on your own.
  • 1) 5 pts. Identify the 5 alliteration pairs
    throughout the poem.
  • 2) 10 pts. Describe the authors purpose of using
    each one. Describe the mood and images of each.
  • 3) 10 pts. Summarize in a complete answer The
    poet most likely uses alliteration in this poem
    to

14
Tuesday
15
II. Onomatopoeia
  • Definition - sound words
  • (hum, jingle, buzz, vroom, bleep,
    etc)
  • Purpose To create a rhythm effect to set a
  • mood or image.
  • - To reveal the speakers attitude

16
Listen
  • "The Bells" is a heavily onomatopoeic poem by
    Edgar Allan Poe which was not published until
    after his death in 1849. It is perhaps best known
    for the repetition of the word "bells."
  • Pay attention to the mood of each part and what
    caused each mood.
  • Take note of the mood in the margins. Underline
    words and phrases that caused that mood.

17
Test Question In this stanza, the poet uses
onomatopoeia with the words tinkle, bell,
and jingle mostly likely to
Poe lived in the Bronx for  number of years, and
his house can still be visited a few blocks from
Fordham, on the Grand Concourse. You could not
hear the bells of University Church there now -
the din of the Bronx is too great, and since the
Church was only built in 1845, its bells would
have had to have had a dramatic effect on Poe.
Still, stranger things have happened......
  • Hear the sledges with the bells - Silver bells!
    What a world of merriment their melody
    foretells! How they tinkle, tinkle, tinkle, In
    the icy air of night! While the stars that
    oversprinkle All the heavens, seem to twinkle
    With a crystalline delight Keeping time, time,
    time, In a sort of Runic rhyme, To the
    tintinnabulation that so musically wells From
    the bells, bells, bells, bells, Bells, bells,
    bells - From the jingling and the tinkling of
    the bells.
  • -The Bells
    Part 1 by Edgar Allen Poe

To create a rhythm effect to set a mood? What
mood or image? What image? To reveal the
speakers attitude? What might his attitude be?
Turn and talk it out.
18
Test Question In this stanza, the poet uses
onomatopoeia with the words clang, clash, and
shriek mostly likely to
  • Hear the loud alarum bells - Brazen bells! What
    a tale of terror, now, their turbulency tells! In
    the startled ear of night How they scream out
    their affright! Too much horrified to speak, They
    can only shriek, shriek, Out of tune, In a
    clamorous appealing to the mercy of the fire, In
    a mad expostulation with the deaf and frantic
    fire, Leaping higher, higher, higher, With a
    desperate desire, And a resolute endeavor Now
    -now to sit or never, By the side of the
    pale-faced moon. Oh, the bells, bells,
    bells! What a tale their terror tells Of
    despair! How they clang, and clash, and
    roar! What a horror they outpour On the bosom of
    the palpitating air! Yet the ear it fully
    knows, By the twanging And the clanging, How the
    danger ebbs and flows Yet the ear distinctly
    tells, In the jangling And the wrangling, How the
    danger sinks and swells, By the sinking or the
    swelling in the anger of the bells - Of the
    bells, Of the bells, bells, bells, bells, Bells,
    bells, bells - In the clamor and the clangor of
    the bells!
  • -The Bells Part 3 by Edgar Allen Poe

To create a rhythm effect to set a mood? What
mood or image? What image? To reveal the
speakers attitude? What might his attitude be?
Turn and talk it out.
19
The Highwayman by Alfred Noyes
  • Listen
  • Onomatopoeia Homework 22 points
  • Reread the poem on your own.
  • 1) 3 pts. Identify 3 onomatopoeia throughout the
    poem.
  • 2) 6 pts. Describe the authors purpose of using
    each one. Describe the mood and images of each.
  • 3) 3 pts. What might the speakers attitude be
    during each example?
  • 4) 10 pts. Summarize in a complete answer The
    poet most likely uses onomatopoeia in this poem
    to

20
Wednesday
21
III. Rhythm
  • Definition The beat of the poem
  • Purpose To create a rhythm effect to set a mood
    or image.
  • - To reveal the speakers attitude
  • Usually, we can feel the rhythm best when we read
    aloud. We can mark the beats, or stresses and
    thus, see the pattern built in by the poet.
    Usually, we mark the stresses in a line of poetry
    with a small sloping dash above the accented
    syllable.
  • , ,
  • po e try ques tion

22
Test Question The sound effect used most in
these lines is What are the reasons the poet
uses this accent? Turn and talk it over What
other sound devices are used by this poet? Why
might the poet have used each? Turn and talk it
over
  • The wind was a torrent of darkness among the
    gusty trees, The moon was a ghostly galleon
    tossed upon cloudy seas, The road was a ribbon
    of moonlight over the purple moor, And the
    highwayman came riding Ridingriding The
    highwayman came riding, up to the old inn-door.
  • The Highwayman by Alfred Noyes

23
Accent
  • Definition The emphasis given to a syllable or
    word.
  • Purpose To reveal the speakers attitude.

24
Test Question What are the reasons the poet
uses this accent? Turn and talk it over
  • It was many and many a year ago,
  • In a kingdom by the sea
  • That a maiden there lived whom you may know
  • By the name of Annabel Lee
  • And this maiden she lived with no other thought
  • Than to love and be loved by me.
  • She was a child and I was a child,
  • In this kingdom by the sea,
  • But we loved with a love that was more than love
  • I am my Annabel Lee
  • Annabel Lee by Edgar Allan
    Poe

25
The Highwayman by Alfred Noyes
  • Listen
  • Rhythm/Accent Homework 30 points
  • Reread Part 2 Stanzas I and II of the poem on
    your own.
  • 1) 5 pts. Identify the sound devices in this
    section of the poem.
  • 2) 10pts. Describe the authors purpose of using
    each one. What rhythmic effect did he create?
    Describe the mood and images of each.
  • 3) 5 pts. What might the speakers attitude be
    during each example?
  • 4) 10 pts. Write in a complete answer Which
    sound device does the poet use the most in
    stanzas I and II of Part 2.

26
Thursday
27
Rhyme and Repetition
  • Rhythm and Rhyme are some of the most important
    structural elements in poetry.

28
IV. Rhyme
  • Rhyme is usually accepted as the repetition of
    an accented vowel sound
  • Examples of true rhyme fight/night, cat/mat,
    slow/toe, eat/feet
  • Examples which are not true rhyme fight/hide,
    cat/can, threw/through
  • Purpose - Rhyme is used to bind lines together
    into larger units, e.g stanzas, or even to set up
    relationships within an individual line (internal
    rhyme).

29
End Rhyme
  • The most common rhyme pattern used by poets is
    that called end rhyme. This simply means that the
    end words of lines rhyme.
  • Two consecutive lines may rhyme, or alternate
    lines may rhyme, or even more distant lines.
  • Many variations are possible within a single
    poem.
  • The consistent feature is that the rhyme occurs
    only at the end of lines.

30
Test Question The rhyme occurs on which lines?
  • He clasps the crag with crooked hands
  • Close to the sun in lonely lands,
  • Ringed with the azure world, he stands.
  • From The Eagle by Alfred, Lord Tennyson

31
Test Question The rhyme occurs on which lines?
  • Sunset and evening star,
  • And one clear call for me!
  • And may there be no moaning of the bar,
  • When I put out to sea
  • From Crossing the Bar by Alfred, Lord Tennyson

32
Internal Rhyme
  • When the rhyme pattern involves rhyming a word
    half-way through a single line of poetry with the
    end word of the same line, it is called internal
    rhyme. It is used fairly frequently in ballads,
    and occasionally in other kinds of poetry.

33
Test Question The rhyme occurs on which
lines?  
  • And I had done a horrible thing
  • And it would work em woe
  • For all averred, I had killed the bird
  • That made the breeze to blow.
  • Ah wretch! said they, the bird to slay,
  • That made the breeze to blow.
  • From The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by S. T.
    Coleridge

What kinds of rhymes are used? What purpose do
they have?
34
V. Repetition
  • Definition - Repeating of a word, phrase, line,
    stanza.
  • Purpose -To complement or emphasize the
    message/theme of the poem.
  • -To create a rhythm effect to set a
    mood or image.
  • -To reveal the speakers attitude.

35
  • Repetition of words or lines or stanzas is
    crucial in poetry!
  • Purpose - It most often to complement or
    emphasize the message/theme of the poem.
  • - To reveal the speakers
    attitude.

36
Test Question The poet uses repetition mainly
to
  • The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
  • But I have promises to keep,
  • And miles to go before I sleep,
  • And miles to go before I sleep.
  • From Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening by
    Robert Frost

Turn and Talk It Out To complement or emphasize
the message/theme of the poem. What might the
theme be? How does the repetition emphasize
it? To reveal the speakers attitude. What
attitude do you hear?
37
Test Question The poet uses repetition mainly
to
  • A Noiseless Patient Spider
    Video
  • A noiseless patient spider, I mark'd where on a
    little promontory it stood isolated, Mark'd how
    to explore the vacant vast surrounding, It
    launch'd forth filament, filament, filament, out
    of itself, Ever unreeling them, ever tirelessly
    speeding them. And you O my soul where you
    stand, Surrounded, detached, in measureless
    oceans of space, Ceaselessly musing, venturing,
    throwing, seeking the spheres to connect
    them, Till the bridge you will need be form'd,
    till the ductile anchor hold, Till the gossamer
    thread you fling catch somewhere, O my soul.
  • by Walt Whitman

Turn and Talk It Out To complement or emphasize
the message/theme of the poem. What might the
theme be? How does the repetition emphasize
it? To reveal the speakers attitude. What
attitude do you hear?
38
Annabel Lee
  • Turn and Talk It Out
  • What is the authors attitude?
  • What is the theme?

39
The Highwayman
  • Turn and Talk It Out
  • What is the authors attitude?
  • What is the theme?

40
Annabel Lee
  • Test Question
  • What sound device does the poet use the most?
    Support your answer.
  • Alliteration
  • Onomatopoeia
  • Accent
  • Rhythm
  • Rhyme
  • Repetition

41
The Highwayman
  • Test Question
  • What sound device does the poet use the most?
    Support your answer.
  • Alliteration
  • Onomatopoeia
  • Accent
  • Rhythm
  • Rhyme
  • Repetition

42
The Highwayman by Alfred Noyes
  • Listen
  • Theme Homework 25 points
  • Reread the poem on your own.
  • Explain the repetition, rhythm, and accent used
    by the poet.
  • Then, explain the theme?
  • How does the repetition, rhythm, and accent
    emphasize the theme?

43
Friday
44
7th Period Sound Device Assignment 100 points total Read The Highwayman by Alfred Noyes Literature Book p. 587 50 points 7th Period Sound Device Assignment 100 points total Read The Highwayman by Alfred Noyes Literature Book p. 587 50 points 7th Period Sound Device Assignment 100 points total Read The Highwayman by Alfred Noyes Literature Book p. 587 50 points
Sound devices used Examples and line s What is the poets purpose in using this?
alliteration onomatopoeia accent / rhythm rhyme Repetition
What sound device did the poet use the most in
this poem?
50 points What is the poems theme? (topic
main events theme sentence) Critique the poets
usage of sound devices. Which sound devices
helped you understand the authors theme best?
Explain how. Which sound devices did not
help you understand the theme? Explain why
they didnt.
45
1st and 5th period Sound Device Assignment 100
pts
  • Reread The Highwayman by Alfred Noyes and
    Annabel Lee by Edgar Allan Poe.
  • Critique both poems in an organized essay
  • What sound device was used the most?
  • For what purpose did the poets use that sound
    device so much?
  • What effect did the sound device have on you.
  • What was the theme?
  • Which sound devices helped you understand the
    theme the best?
  • You must answer all of the above for each poem in
    your essay.

46
The End of Sound Devices
  • Thank-you!

47
  • Assonance refers to the repetition of vowels in
    words next to or close to each other, without
    regard for the following sounds. For example, So
    well go no more a-roving is an assonance that
    repeats the o vowel. It complements the
    attitude of the speaker the o sound produces a
    moaning effect as if the speaker longs to spend
    time with his lover. Reed / wheel is an example
    of assonance, but reed / weed as an example of
    rhyme.

48
  • Consonance refers to fixed consonant but
    changing vowel sounds. For example, e/scaped
    and scooped, groined and groaned,
    be/stirred and stared.

49
Half Rhyme
  • Half rhyme is a technique similar to pararhyme,
    but in which either the beginning or end sound is
    different, in addition to the different vowel
    sound. Examples of half rhyme are mouth/truth
    and come/fame.

50
  • The anchor broke, the topmast split,
  • Twas such a deadly storm
  • The waves came over the broken ship
  • Till all her sides were torn.
  • From Sir Patrick Spens, Anonymous

51
Pararhyme
  • A pararhyme is a poetic convention used to create
    dissonance in a poem. The basic pararhyme has
    beginning and end sounds that sound the same,
    with the vowel sound in the word being altered.
    Examples of pararhyme are night/naught,
    block/black/bleak and laughed/loft.

52
  • The effect of pararhyme and half rhyme is to
    create a sense of rhyme, with a slightly
    discordant feel. Two examples are provided. The
    first is from Sir Patrick Spens and is, in
    fact, assonance. The second is part of a poem by
    the British poet, Wilfred Owen who, perhaps more
    than most poets, refined the art of deliberately
    using pararhyme and half rhyme, often
    interspersed in alternate lines.

53
  • It seemed that out of battle I escaped Down some
    profound dull tunnel, long since scooped Through
    granites which titanic wars had groined. Yet also
    there encumbered sleepers groaned, Too fast in
    thought or death to be bestirred. Then, as I
    probed them, one sprang up, and stared With
    piteous recognition in fixed eyes, Lifting
    distressful hands as if to bless. And by his
    smile, I knew that sullen hall By his dead smile
    I knew we stood in Hell.
  • From Strange Meeting by Wilfred Owen
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