School-wide Positive Behavior Support: Discipline - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – School-wide Positive Behavior Support: Discipline PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 651981-MDlhM



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

School-wide Positive Behavior Support: Discipline

Description:

School-wide Positive Behavior Support: Discipline & Beyond George Sugai OSEP Center on PBIS Center for Behavioral Education and Research University of Connecticut – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:214
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 64
Provided by: GSu6
Learn more at: http://dev.pbis.org
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: School-wide Positive Behavior Support: Discipline


1
School-wide Positive Behavior Support Discipline
Beyond
  • George Sugai
  • OSEP Center on PBIS
  • Center for Behavioral Education and Research
  • University of Connecticut
  • July 28, 2008
  • www.pbis.org www.cber.org
  • George.sugai_at_uconn.edu

2
Purpose
  • Describe rationale, features, outcomes of
    SWPBS (PBIS)
  • Prevention
  • Continuum of Evidence-based Practices
  • Academic-Behavior Link
  • Systems Capacity

3
4 Challenges
  • Negative school-wide disciplinary climate
  • Get Tough discipline
  • Train-n-Hope professional development
  • Lack of effective minutes

4
SW-PBS Logic!
  • Successful individual student behavior support
    is linked to host environments or school
    climates that are effective, efficient, relevant,
    durable
  • (Zins Ponti, 1990)

5
Non-responsive problem behavior.Get
Tough!Disciplinary RtI
  • Clamp down increase monitoring
  • Re-re-re-review rules
  • Extend continuum consistency of consequences
  • Establish bottom line

6
When behavior doesnt improve, we Get Tougher!
  • Zero tolerance policies
  • Increased surveillance
  • Increased suspension expulsion
  • In-service training by expert
  • Alternative programming
  • ..Predictable systems response!

7
But.false sense of safety/security!
  • Fosters environments of control
  • Triggers reinforces antisocial behavior
  • Shifts accountability away from school
  • Devalues child-adult relationship
  • Weakens relationship between academic social
    behavior programming

8
Science of behavior has taught us that students.
  • Are NOT born with bad behaviors
  • Do NOT learn when presented contingent aversive
    consequences
  • ..Do learn better ways of behaving by being
    taught directly receiving positive feedback

9
Prevention
10
SWPBS is about.
11
WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT PREVENTING VIOLENCE?
  • Surgeon Generals Report on Youth Violence (2001)
  • Coordinated Social Emotional Learning
    (Greenberg et al., 2003)
  • Center for Study Prevention of Violence (2006)
  • White House Conference on School Violence (2006)
  • Positive, predictable school-wide climate
  • High rates of academic social success
  • Formal social skills instruction
  • Positive active supervision reinforcement
  • Positive adult role models
  • Multi-component, multi-year school-family-communit
    y effort

12
What is RtI? SWPBS detour
13
(No Transcript)
14
RtI
15
RtI Good IDEiA Policy
  • Approach or framework for redesigning
    establishing teaching learning environments
    that are effective, efficient, relevant,
    durable for all students, families educators
  • NOT program, curriculum, strategy, intervention
  • NOT limited to special education
  • NOT new

16
Quotable Fixsen
  • Policy is
  • Allocation of limited resources for unlimited
    needs
  • Opportunity, not guarantee, for good action
  • Training does not predict action
  • Manualized treatments have created overly rigid
    rapid applications

17
(No Transcript)
18
Whered triangle come from.a PBIS perspective?
19
Triangle ?s
  • Why triangle?
  • Why not pyramid or octagon?
  • Why not 12 tiers? 2 tiers?
  • Whats it got to do w/ education?
  • Whered those s come from?

20
Public Health Disease PreventionKutash et al.,
2006 Larson, 1994
  • Tertiary (FEW)
  • Reduce complications, intensity, severity of
    current cases
  • Secondary (SOME)
  • Reduce current cases of problem behavior
  • Primary (ALL)
  • Reduce new cases of problem behavior

21
(No Transcript)
22
Tertiary Prevention Specialized
Individualized Systems for Students with
High-Risk Behavior
CONTINUUM OF SCHOOL-WIDE INSTRUCTIONAL
POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT
5
Secondary Prevention Specialized Group Systems
for Students with At-Risk Behavior
15
Primary Prevention School-/Classroom- Wide
Systems for All Students, Staff, Settings
80 of Students
23
Designing School-Wide Systems for Student Success
Academic Systems
Behavioral Systems
1-5
1-5
5-10
5-10
80-90
80-90
24
RtI Application Examples
EARLY READING/LITERACY SOCIAL BEHAVIOR
TEAM General educator, special educator, reading specialist, Title I, school psychologist, etc. General educator, special educator, behavior specialist, Title I, school psychologist, etc.
UNIVERSAL SCREENING Curriculum based measurement SSBD, record review, gating
PROGRESS MONITORING Curriculum based measurement ODR, suspensions, behavior incidents, precision teaching
EFFECTIVE INTERVENTIONS 5-specific reading skills phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension Direct social skills instruction, positive reinforcement, token economy, active supervision, behavioral contracting, group contingency management, function-based support, self-management
DECISION MAKING RULES Core, strategic, intensive Primary, secondary, tertiary tiers
25
Responsiveness to InterventionAcademic
Social Behavior
26
RTI Continuum of Support for ALL
Few
Some
All
Dec 7, 2007
27
(No Transcript)
28
SWPBS Features
29
(No Transcript)
30
Implementation Levels
State
District
School
Classroom
Student
31
  • SWPBS Conceptual Foundations

Behaviorism
ABA
PBS
SWPBS
32
Supporting Social Competence Academic
Achievement
Basics 4 PBS Elements
OUTCOMES
Supporting Decision Making
DATA
Supporting Staff Behavior
SYSTEMS
PRACTICES
Supporting Student Behavior
33
CONTINUUM of SWPBS
  • TERTIARY PREVENTION
  • Function-based support
  • Wraparound/PCP
  • Special Education
  • Audit
  • Identify existing practices by tier
  • Specify outcome for each effort
  • Evaluate implementation accuracy outcome
    effectiveness
  • Eliminate/integrate based on outcomes
  • Establish decision rules (RtI)

5
15
  • SECONDARY PREVENTION
  • Check in/out
  • Targeted social skills instruction
  • Peer-based supports
  • Social skills club
  • PRIMARY PREVENTION
  • Teach encourage positive SW expectations
  • Proactive SW discipline
  • Effective instruction
  • Parent engagement

80 of Students
34
Train Hope
35
PBS Systems Implementation Logic
Visibility
Funding
Political Support
Leadership Team Active Integrated Coordination
Training
Evaluation
Coaching
Local School Teams/Demonstrations
36
GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS Getting Started
Team
Agreements
Data-based Action Plan
Implementation
Evaluation
37
(No Transcript)
38
(No Transcript)
39
Referrals by Problem Behavior
40
Referrals per Location
41
Referrals per Student
42
Referrals by Time of Day
43
SWPBS Subsystems
School-wide
Classroom
Family
Non-classroom
Student
44
School-wide
  • 1. Common purpose approach to discipline
  • 2. Clear set of positive expectations behaviors
  • 3. Procedures for teaching expected behavior
  • 4. Continuum of procedures for encouraging
    expected behavior
  • 5. Continuum of procedures for discouraging
    inappropriate behavior
  • 6. Procedures for on-going monitoring evaluation

45
Non-classroom
  • Positive expectations routines taught
    encouraged
  • Active supervision by all staff
  • Scan, move, interact
  • Precorrections reminders
  • Positive reinforcement

46
Classroom
  • Classroom-wide positive expectations taught
    encouraged
  • Teaching classroom routines cues taught
    encouraged
  • Ratio of 6-8 positive to 1 negative adult-student
    interaction
  • Active supervision
  • Redirections for minor, infrequent behavior
    errors
  • Frequent precorrections for chronic errors
  • Effective academic instruction curriculum

47
Individual Student
  • Behavioral competence at school district levels
  • Function-based behavior support planning
  • Team- data-based decision making
  • Comprehensive person-centered planning
    wraparound processes
  • Targeted social skills self-management
    instruction
  • Individualized instructional curricular
    accommodations

48
Family
  • Continuum of positive behavior support for all
    families
  • Frequent, regular positive contacts,
    communications, acknowledgements
  • Formal active participation involvement as
    equal partner
  • Access to system of integrated school community
    resources

49
Who does SWPBS look like?
50
Pre
Post
51
Elementary School Suspension Rate
52
Elementary School
53
(No Transcript)
54
Middle School Suspension Rate
55
Middle School
56
.85
.64
Schools doing SW-PBS well report a 25 lower rate
of ODRs
57
Schools doing SW-PBS well report associated in
increases reading achievement
58
Schools doing SW-PBS well report associated in
increases reading achievement
N 23
N 8
N 8
N 23
59
05
20
11
22
84
58
SWPBS schools are more preventive
60
Mean Proportion of Students
3 8 89
10 16 74
11 18 71
ODR rates vary by level
K6 (N 1010) 6-9 (N 312)
9-12 (N 104)
61
A few kids get many ODRs
32 43 25
48 37 15
45 40 15
K-6 (N 1010) 6-9 (N 312)
9-12 (N 104)
62
(No Transcript)
63
SWPBS investments in
About PowerShow.com