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Characteristics of Renaissance Art

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Characteristics of Renaissance Art Fra Angelico, The Annunciation, 1437-46 Interest in All Things Classical The Renaissance is primarily known as a rebirth of ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Characteristics of Renaissance Art


1
Characteristics of Renaissance Art
Fra Angelico, The Annunciation, 1437-46
2
Interest in All Things Classical
  • The Renaissance is primarily known as a rebirth
    of Classical Greek and Roman art, architecture
    and literary technique.

In Botticellis La Primavera (c. 1482), the
figures are all Greek gods and goddesses.
3
Interest in the Human Body
  • Artists showed an interest in correct human
    anatomy and in showing off the nude figure.
  • They saw the body as a thing of beauty, not
    something to be hidden.
  • Leonardo da Vinci worked with doctors to dissect
    cadavers, filling his notebooks with drawings and
    measurements.

Drawing of a womans torso from the notebooks of
Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519)
4
Perspective
  • Through perspective, artists created the illusion
    of a three-dimensional world on a two-dimensional
    surface like a piece of paper, a canvas or a
    wall.
  • The eye of the viewer is guided through the
    picture to the focal point, also called the
    vanishing point.

Perugino, The Delivery of the Keys, 1481-2
5
Pyramidal Configuration
6
Modeling
  • Artists used what is called modeling to make
    figures look three-dimensional or rounded.
  • The effect is achieved through the use of color
    and shadow.

Mantegna, Lamentation over the Dead Christ, 1490
7
Proto-Renaissance Art
Medieval Art Italo-Byzantine Madonna and Child,
13th century
Proto-Renaissance Art Duccio, Madonna and Child
with Angels, c. 1282-1307
8
Duccio
  • Duccio dominated the art scene of Siena,
    Florences rival artistic center, in the early
    14th century.
  • Notice that he still paints in the medieval and
    Byzantine style.
  • But the work is still innovative because the
    figures begin to show weight, solidity and
    emotion.

Duccios Maestà Altarpiece, 1308-1311, Siena,
Italy
9
Giotto
  • Giotto was a Florentine painter and architect.
  • Significant to the Renaissance Masaccio, Raphael
    and Michelangelo all studied his work.
  • Found simple solutions to problems of
    representing space and volume and cut narrative
    scenes down to their dramatic core.

Giotto, Frescoes in the Arena Chapel, Padua,
1303-6
10
Giotto
  • This is one of the most well-known of Giottos
    frescoes.
  • The sweep of Judas cloak draws your eye to his
    and Jesus faces, where the central action of the
    scene lies.
  • The whole drama of the event is captured in the
    exchange of glances between Jesus and Judas.

Scenes from the Life of Christ Scene 15 The
Arrest of Christ (Kiss of Judas), Arena Chapel,
1304-6
11
Early Renaissance Art
Proto-Renaissance Art Duccio, Madonna and Child
with Angels, c. 1282-1307
Early Renaissance Art Masaccio, Madonna del
Solletico, c. 1426
12
Masaccio
  • First great painter of the Italian Renaissance.
  • Inspired by Brunelleschi and Donatello.
  • Mastered perspective to create the illusion of
    three-dimensionality.

Masaccio, Frescoes in the Brancacci Chapel,
Florence, Italy, 1426-82
13
Masaccio
  • This fresco is considered to be one of Masaccios
    masterpieces.
  • Masaccios work is characterized by strong
    emotion, solid figures, and an understanding of
    light and shadow.
  • This work was the first nude depicted in painting
    since the Fall of Rome.

The Expulsion from the Garden of Eden, Brancacci
Chapel, 1426-7
14
Donatello
  • Donatello worked primarily as a sculptor, usually
    in bronze or marble.
  • Donatello was not a cultured intellectual and
    often demanded artistic freedom from his patrons.
  • Donatello was interested in showing realistic
    human anatomy and the spirit of the individual in
    his works.

Donatello, St. Mary Magdalene, carving in wood,
c. 1457
15
Donatello
  • This statue was commissioned by Cosimo de
    Medici.
  • It was the first, life-sized, nude sculpture
    created since the Fall of Rome.
  • The pose in which David stands is typical of
    Renaissance figures. It is called contrapposto.

David, bronze, c. 1430
16
Brunelleschi
  • Brunelleschi was both a sculptor and an
    architect.
  • He designed and completed the dome for the
    unfinished Gothic cathedral in Florence.
  • This dome was the first created since Classical
    times.

Dome of the Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore (Il
Duomo), 1420-36
17
Later High Renaissance Art
High Renaissance Art Raphael, The Alba Madonna,
c. 1510
Early Renaissance Art Masaccio, Madonna del
Solletico, c. 1426
18
Study these two sculptures
Christ Carrying the Cross, Michelangelo, 1521
David, Andrea Verrocchio, 1437-5
19
Cire Perdue Casting
Ghiberti, Doors of Paradise, Panel Abraham and
Isaac, Gilt bronze, 1452
Donatello, David, bronze, c. 1430
20
Carrara Marble
Carrara Quarry
Michelangelo, David, Carrara marble, 1504
21
Study these two paintings
Fra Carnevale, The Birth of the Virgin, 1467
Jan van Eyck, The Madonna of Chancellor Rolin,
mid-1400s
22
Egg Tempera
Ground ultramarine pigment
Mortar and Pestle
23
Oil Painting
Linseed Oil the not-so-secret ingredient for oil
painting
24
Fresco Painting
The triangle-shaped wedges are called pendentives.
25
Fresco Painting
Preparatory Sketch
26
Fresco Painting
This is a cartoon for the unfinished Michelangelo
painting Epifania (another name for the
Adoration). It was drawn in black chalk on 26
sheets of paper and measures over 2 meters tall.
27
Fresco Painting
This is a sinopia by Simone Martini for a fresco
at the Palace of the Popes in Avignon, France.
c.1341
28
Fresco Painting
The line formed by the giornata can be seen along
the arm, head and back of this figure from the
Sistine Chapel, painted by Michelangelo.
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