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User Interface Evaluation

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Title: User Interface Evaluation Author: Juan E. Gilbert Last modified by: Juan E. Gilbert Created Date: 3/29/2002 3:42:58 PM Document presentation format – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: User Interface Evaluation


1
User Interface Evaluation
  • Usability Inquiry Methods
  • http//jthom.best.vwh.net/usability/
  • http//www.cs.umd.edu/zzj/UsabilityHome.html

2
Usability Inquiry Methods
  • Usability experts learn about the users likes,
    dislikes, needs, etc. of the system through
  • Observation
  • Verbal questioning
  • Written questioning
  • Widely used in practice.
  • Different methods have different costs, but in
    general, this is relatively cheap.

3
Usability Inquiry Methods
  • Contextual Inquiry
  • Field Observation
  • Questionnaires
  • Interviews
  • Focus Groups
  • Logging Actual Use

4
Contextual Inquiry
  • Contextual Inquiry is also known as proactive
    field studies.
  • Applicable Stages
  • Requirements Design
  • Personnel
  • Usability Experts, approximately 1.
  • Developers, 0.
  • Users, 2.

5
Contextual Inquiry
  • Usability Issues Covered
  • Effectiveness No
  • Efficiency No
  • Satisfaction No
  • Quantitative Data is NOT collected.
  • Can NOT be conducted remotely.
  • Can be used on any system.

6
Contextual Inquiry
  • What is it?
  • Before designing the system, the expert(s) visit
    the users workplace and question them.
  • This should occur before any design has been done.

7
Contextual Inquiry
  • How can I do it?
  • Determine who your users are.
  • Go visit them where they work.

8
Contextual Inquiry
  • How can I do it?
  • Talk to them about the system
  • How do they currently do their job?
  • How would you like to do your job?
  • What do you like about the current system/method?
  • What dont you like about the current
    system/method?
  • http//jthom.best.vwh.net/usability/context.htm
  • http//www.cs.umd.edu/zzj/FieldStu.htm

9
Field Observation
  • Applicable Stages
  • Test Deployment
  • Personnel
  • Usability Experts, approximately 1.
  • Developers, 0.
  • Users, 2.

10
Field Observation
  • Usability Issues Covered
  • Effectiveness Yes
  • Efficiency No
  • Satisfaction Yes
  • Quantitative Data is NOT collected.
  • Can NOT be conducted remotely.
  • Can be used on any system.

11
Field Observation
  • What is it?
  • Usability experts observe users in the field
    using the system/product.

12
Field Observation
  • How can I do it?
  • Go to the users workplace and simply observe.
  • Things to look for
  • What is the users mental model?
  • Are the users using it the way you expect?
  • You dont want them to know you are evaluating
    them.
  • http//www.cs.umd.edu/zzj/FieldObs.htm

13
Questionnaires
  • Applicable Stages
  • Any stage of development (depending on the
    questions)
  • Personnel
  • Usability Experts, approximately 1.
  • Developers, 0.
  • Users, 2.

14
Questionnaires
  • Usability Issues Covered
  • Effectiveness Yes
  • Efficiency No
  • Satisfaction Yes
  • Quantitative Data is NOT collected.
  • Can be conducted remotely.
  • Can be used on any system.

15
Questionnaires
  • What is it?
  • Written lists of questions that you distribute to
    your users.

16
Questionnaires
  • How can I do it?
  • Develop a list of questions on paper, web, email,
    etc. and give the questionnaire(s) to the users.
  • The users will answer the questions and return
    the questionnaires to you.
  • http//jthom.best.vwh.net/usability/question.htm
  • http//www.acm.org/perlman/question.html

17
Interviews
  • Applicable Stages
  • Any stage of development (depending on the
    questions)
  • Personnel
  • Usability Experts, approximately 1.
  • Developers, 0.
  • Users, 1.

18
Interviews
  • Usability Issues Covered
  • Effectiveness Yes
  • Efficiency No
  • Satisfaction Yes
  • Quantitative Data is NOT collected.
  • Can be conducted remotely.
  • Can be used on any system.

19
Interviews
  • What is it?
  • You interview users and ask them questions.

20
Interviews
  • How can I do it?
  • Develop a list of questions for the users.
  • Meet with the users, individually.
  • Ask them the questions and log the responses
  • Written and/or taped

21
Interviews
  • How can I do it?
  • Interview Tips
  • Clearly define this is an interview.
  • Ask open ended questions to get the user talking.
    Yes-No questions are bad.
  • Begin with less demanding topics and progress to
    more difficult topics.
  • Dont ask questions to support your belief or
    hypothesis.
  • Do not answer your own questions.
  • Do not agree or disagree remain neutral.

22
Interviews
  • How can I do it?
  • Probes used to encourage the subjects to
    continue speaking, or to guide their response in
    a particular direction
  • Addition Probe
  • Encourages more information or clarifies certain
    responses from the test users. Either verbally or
    nonverbally the message is, "Go on, tell me
    more," or "Don't stop."

23
Interviews
  • How can I do it?
  • Reflecting Probe
  • Uses a nondirective technique, encourages the
    test user to give more detailed information. The
    interviewer can reformulate the question or
    synthesize the previous response as a
    proposition.
  • Directive Probe
  • Specifies the direction in which a continuation
    of the reply should follow without suggesting any
    particular content. A directive probe may take
    the form of "Why is the (the case)?"

24
Interviews
  • How can I do it?
  • Defining Probe
  • Requires the subject to explain the meaning of a
    particular term or concept.
  • http//jthom.best.vwh.net/usability/surveys.htm
  • http//www.cs.umd.edu/zzj/Interview.htm

25
Focus Groups
  • Applicable Stages
  • Test Deployment
  • Personnel
  • Usability Experts, approximately 1.
  • Developers, 0.
  • Users, 6.

26
Focus Groups
  • Usability Issues Covered
  • Effectiveness Yes
  • Efficiency No
  • Satisfaction Yes
  • Quantitative Data is NOT collected.
  • Can be conducted remotely with email, bulletin
    boards, conference calls, etc.
  • Can be used on any system.

27
Focus Groups
  • What is it?
  • A group of users are gathered to talk about the
    system.
  • The expert acts as the moderator.
  • Should conduct more than 1 focus group.

28
Focus Groups
  • How can I do it?
  • Bring a group of users together and begin.
  • Collect data
  • http//www.cs.umd.edu/zzj/FocusGro.htm

29
Logging Actual Use
  • Applicable Stages
  • Test Deployment
  • Personnel
  • Usability Experts, approximately 1.
  • Developers, 0.
  • Users, 6.

30
Logging Actual Use
  • Usability Issues Covered
  • Effectiveness Yes
  • Efficiency Yes
  • Satisfaction Maybe
  • Quantitative Data is NOT collected, in most
    cases.
  • Can be conducted remotely.
  • Can be used on most systems.

31
Logging Actual Use
  • What is it?
  • The computer automatically collect usage data.
  • You could ask the user to log their usage, but
    thats not practical.

32
Logging Actual Use
  • How can I do it?
  • Usability Logger
  • http//www.usabletools.com/
  • Automatic capture of keyboard, mouse, etc.
  • VideoCam and other products.

33
Logging Actual Use
  • Facts On Logging Actual Use
  • You know exactly what the user is doing.
  • You dont know why, but you do know what, when,
    where.
  • You dont know how the user feels.
  • http//www.cs.umd.edu/zzj/Logging.htm

34
Usability Inquiry Methodsmost useful
  • Contextual Inquiry
  • Field Observation
  • Questionnaires
  • Interviews
  • Focus Groups (least useful)
  • Logging Actual Use
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