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Growing Your program in 10 easy steps

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Title: Using School Based Programs to Support Homeless Students Author: CP8230 Last modified by: CDUKES Created Date: 6/17/2013 9:29:28 PM Document presentation format – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Growing Your program in 10 easy steps


1
Growing Your program in 10 easy steps
  • National Association for the Education of
    Homeless Children and Youth
  • 2013 National Conference
  • Atlanta, Georgia

2
Contact Information
  • Heather Denny, MEd
  • State Coordinator for Homeless Education
  • Montana Office of Public Instruction
  • PO Box 202501
  • Helena, MT 59620-2501
  • (406) 444-2036
  • hdenny_at_mt.gov

3
1. Start with a Needs Assessment
4
Community needs assessment
  • Ask if the district did a previous assessment
  • Check with local non-profits to determine if
    anyone has done a needs assessment as part of a
    grant application
  • Check with your local HUD CoC to determine if
    they have done a local needs assessment
  • All of this data can be used in combination with
    a district level assessment to determine larger
    community issues

5
How many homeless children are in my district?
  • Approximately 10 of the students who receive
    free or reduced lunch experience an episode of
    homelessness during the school year.
  • Approximately 50 of all homeless children are
    between the ages of 0 and 5 (not enrolled in
    school).
  • Look at community factors that may affect
    homeless rates
  • Unemployment rates
  • Availability of affordable housing
  • Access to housing support (HUD/Section 8)
  • Is your community an access point for services?
  • Do you have shelters (homeless, domestic
    violence, etc.)

6
How many homeless students are in my district?
  • What are their ages?
  • Which schools are they in?
  • Are there certain times of year that families
    become homeless?
  • Are homeless students moving in and out of my
    school? Why? From/to where?
  • Are their other categories they fit into?
  • LEP 13-14 nationally
  • Migrant 1 nationally
  • Special Education 13-14 nationally
  • Unaccompanied Youth 6-8 nationally
  • Indian Education
  • Gifted Talented

7
Where do homeless families live in my community?
  • Doubled up 75 nationally
  • Often living with other low-income families
  • May be living with elderly parents
  • They can be in any community.
  • Shelters 15 nationally
  • Emergency Homeless Shelters, Domestic Violence
    Shelters, Youth Shelters, Transitional Living
    Facilities (drug/alcohol, mental health,
    veterans, youth, etc.)
  • Hotels/Motels 6 nationally
  • Low cost, extended-stay, may offer suites or
    kitchenettes
  • Unsheltered 4 nationally
  • Campgrounds, parks, wooded areas, bus stations,
    barns, abandoned homes/campers/buses, areas which
    may provide shelter

8
2. Assess Your Physical Assets
9
Physical Assets in the Building
  • Cafeteria Are you providing meals (breakfast
    and lunch) to homeless students?
  • Gym Do you have shower facilities that students
    could access before/after school?
  • Laundry Do you have a washer and dryer that
    students could access? (In a life skills
    classroom or in the locker rooms?)
  • Do you have extra lockers for unaccompanied youth
    to use to store clothing and personal items?

10
Physical Assets in the Building
  • Does your library or computer lab stay open
    during lunch/after school so students can access
    computers to do homework?
  • Do you have space in a closet or empty room where
    you could create a food pantry?
  • Do you have space to create a closet for used
    (recycled) clothing?
  • Does the district own vehicles that could be used
    to transport students or parents?
  • Drivers Ed vehicles, delivery vans

11
3. Assess Your Personnel Assets
12
Staff Positions Who is in my Building?
  • Homeless Liaison
  • School Counselor/Social Worker
  • Mental Health Programs
  • School Nurse
  • Parent Liaison (Home-School Coordinator)
  • Special Education
  • Title I Staff
  • Title VII Staff (Indian Education)
  • Title III Staff (Limited English Proficient)
  • Migrant Coordinator (not in your building but
    serving your kids)

13
Homeless Liaison
  • This person should have the capacity and the
    ability to do the job
  • Have a heart for the population
  • The Liaison should serve as an entry point
  • The Liaison acts as an advocate
  • The Liaison connects students to school based
    services
  • The Liaison may also make referrals to community
    agencies
  • The Liaison may assist with transportation of
    parents to school meetings
  • The Liaison may provide direct academic
    assistance
  • The Liaison participates in a number of community
    agency meetings and works with community agencies
    to develop programs to meet the needs of homeless
    families and students.

14
School Counselor/Social Worker
  • This is the ideal staff person to serve as a
    homeless liaison
  • They are trained to provide holistic support to
    students
  • They can provide trauma informed care
  • The ASCA code of ethics allows school counselors
    to share information about a childs homeless
    status with other school personnel
  • School counselors can provide both one on one and
    group counseling
  • School counselors can assist with college
    applications, FAFSA, and scholarships

15
Mental Health CSCT
  • Comprehensive School Community Treatment
  • Paid for by Medicaid or private insurance
  • Unaccompanied Youth can apply for Medicaid
    without a parent/guardian
  • Homeless Youth may suffer from a wide array of
    mental health disorders
  • Depression, PTSD, ADHD, ODD, SED
  • Also drug/alcohol addiction

16
School Nurse
  • Homeless students can be screened by the school
    nurse upon enrollment
  • Vision
  • Dental
  • Diabetes/Malnutrition
  • Provide basic health education to older students
  • Hygiene/Basic self care
  • Nutrition
  • Assist students in obtaining necessary
    immunizations
  • Refer families to County Health Dept. or other
    free or low-cost health care

17
Parent Liaison/Home-School Coordinator
  • Elementary schools should consider this position
    for homeless liaison
  • Usually aware of community supports available to
    families
  • Trained to work with parents and help them engage
    in their childs education
  • Can act as a go between for parents and schools
  • Is often familiar with families who are
    struggling
  • Families see this person as non-threatening (they
    are not a teacher or administrator)

18
Special Education Staff
  • Homeless children have a higher than average rate
    of learning disabilities or cognitive delays
  • Malnutrition
  • Pre-natal drug exposure
  • Exposure to toxins before and after birth
  • Stress and trauma
  • Homeless students may have expedited screenings
    and IEPs
  • Pre-school siblings should be referred for Child
    Find screenings
  • Parents may need help to attend meetings
  • Help parents understand their childs educational
    needs
  • Help youth learn life skills
  • Help youth plan for graduation

19
Title I Staff
  • Homeless and highly mobile students often have
    critical gaps in their learning
  • All homeless students must be screened for Title
    I services
  • Encourage schools to screen homeless students
    upon entry
  • Classroom teachers should work closely with Title
    I teachers to provide support to homeless
    students
  • Title I parent engagement programs should serve
    as a model for engaging homeless parents

20
Title III Staff
  • Homeless students struggling with language arts
    skills should be referred for LEP testing if
  • Parents/caregivers speak another language in the
    home
  • The student spoke another language at home prior
    to entering public school
  • The student was adopted from a foreign country
    after acquiring language skills
  • This includes students who seem to have good
    verbal skills but are struggling to pass written
    exams
  • Being a second language learner is not a learning
    disability!

21
Title VII Staff
  • Serve tribally enrolled American Indian students
  • Work with Title VII staff to provide culturally
    appropriate programming for homeless students and
    families
  • Communicate with students and parents to
    determine eligibility
  • Assist homeless students in obtaining tribal
    enrollment documents if necessary
  • Utilize tutoring and support services for
    eligible students
  • This program is available in the 23 states with
    federally recognized tribes

22
Migrant Education
  • Students may qualify as both migrant and homeless
    based on their parents employment and the
    familys living situation
  • Migrant services should be accessed first (they
    usually have higher levels of funding)
  • Homeless services may help to provide educational
    stability to migrant students
  • Contact the Migrant Education Program to
    determine if students are eligible for services
  • Contact Title III (LEP) staff if the student is
    struggling with language skills and you suspect
    this may be related to being a second language
    learner

23
4. Assess Your Program Assets
24
What Programs Does My School/District Offer?
  • All the Basics
  • Federal Programs Title I, III, VII
  • Special Education
  • School Nutrition Programs
  • School Counseling Programs
  • Bullying Programs
  • Drug/Alcohol Resistance Programs
  • Health/Sex Education Programs
  • Graduation Prep Programs

25
Special Courses
  • Credit Recovery or online courses
  • AP/Honors Courses (Calculus and other high level
    courses)
  • Dual enrollment or early college programs
  • JROTC
  • Technical Courses Auto-CAD, Business,
    Computers, Drafting
  • Vocational Courses Medical Science,
    Agriculture, Culinary, Automotive, Welding,
    Woodworking
  • Life Skills, Personal Finance, Health
    Nutrition, Child Development Parenting, Basic
    Cooking

26
Extra-curricular Courses
  • Homeless students must have equal access to all
    programs, including extra-curricular activities
  • Students who are engaged in extra-curricular
    activities are engaged in school
  • School engagement success
  • Fine Arts Band, Choir, Orchestra, Dance, Drama
  • Athletics Football, Basketball, Track
  • Academics Academic Decathlon, Quiz Bowl,
    Literary Criticism
  • Clubs and Honor Societies NHS, Key Club, Leo
    Club, FFA

27
Extra Supports?
  • Response to Intervention (RtI)
  • Differentiated Instruction Meeting the needs of
    individual students, filling gaps in education
    created by high mobility
  • Tiered Intervention including homeless students
    with other students struggling with the same
    subjects, working one-on-one as needed
  • Assessment assessing homeless students at
    non-traditional times in order to properly place
    them and continue ongoing progress monitoring
  • Behavior Interventions used with students who
    may be exhibiting PTSD-like symptoms

28
PBIS
  • Recognize the signs of trauma and PTSD
  • Understanding that poverty is a disease
  • There are documented neurological effects
  • Recognizing the non-traditional contributions of
    students
  • Homeless youth are often altruistic, they
    understand sacrifice for the greater good
  • They create unique communities of support

29
GEAR-Up or Graduation Matters
  • Work from a strength based perspective
  • Help students understand how to set goals and
    achieve them
  • Start with small steps
  • Praise often you may be the only one
  • Talk college basics
  • Talk about college early and often
  • Actively seek out homeless and homeless
    unaccompanied youth
  • Explain how to answer FAFSA questions to get Pell
    grants and other need-based financial aid

30
Out-of-School Time Learning and Support
  • After School Programs
  • Community Sports - AYSO
  • Summer School
  • Credit Recovery
  • Enrichment
  • Summer Nutrition
  • Job Training/Mentoring
  • Leadership
  • Spring Break/Christmas Break Programs

31
5. Assess Your CommunityAssets
32
Community Supports
  • Government Agencies Federal/State/Tribal/County/
    Local
  • SNAP/WIC
  • Section 8 or other income based housing
  • Medicare/Medicaid/IHS/Health Departments
  • Homeless Advocacy Group think of this as one
    stop shopping
  • Transportation Routes? Cost?
  • Food Bank Where? How much? How often?
  • Backpack Buddy Program
  • Social Organizations most have a component that
    involves children and education
  • Lions Club, Elks Lodge, Rotary, Kiwanis, Masons,
    etc.

33
Community Supports, Cont.
  • Faith-based Organizations (Churches)
  • University or Community/Tribal College
  • Fraternity/Sorority, Honor Society
  • Faculty, Extension Agents
  • Dual enrollment programs
  • Office of Student Support, Financial Aid Office
  • Local Businesses
  • Gift Cards, SWAG,Donations of out of season
    items
  • Thrift Shops
  • Gift cards
  • Interview Outfits
  • Graduation Outfits
  • Prom dresses

34
6. Laying the Foundation
35
Program Basics
  • Enrollment
  • How do you discreetly identify students?
  • Have you removed barriers to enrollment?
  • Have you created a process?
  • School Meals
  • Streamline the process Add liaison info to the
    school meal form
  • Transportation
  • Create a point of contact
  • Plan ahead for possible new routes or drop off
    locations
  • Title I
  • Create a referral process
  • Access to other programs
  • Plan for extra-curricular activities

36
One size fits all?
  • Create one general program that meets the basic
    needs of all students in your school/district
  • Every department should be aware of the role they
    play in the plan
  • Include others in the creation of this plan so
    that everyone is on board (Even if this is just
    via email.)
  • Create option packages that can be added on
    based on the needs of the family/student
  • Special Education, Migrant, Athlete, Honors
    Student, Parenting Teen, LEP (Remember that some
    students may need multiple option packages.)
  • Be flexible!

37
7. Building the Program
38
Building with Legos
  • Have a vision, but be flexible
  • Use the best blocks, but realize you may have to
    make due with what youve got
  • Stack and restack until you get it right
  • Build for strength and sustainability
  • Will I have to do all this work again next year?
  • Can I keep adding on to my existing structure?
  • Can I fit new things in without tearing apart the
    whole thing?

39
Sustainability
  • The program must stand the test of time
  • Should be able to function in the face of
    decreased or zero federal/state funding
  • Build solid infrastructure think about a VISTA
    to help with this (its what they do)
  • Reach out to your community for long term funding
    sources

40
8. Creating a Brand
41
Whats in a name?
  • Try not to use the word Homeless in your
    program name
  • Families in Transition
  • Program names can reflect the unique cultural
    characteristics of your community
  • SSP Program Si, Se Puede! (Yes, it is
    Possible!)
  • The name should reflect the positive nature of
    the assistance that is being offered
  • Student Success Coordinator

42
Create easy recognition
  • Use the same colors for all of the printed
    materials that you put out
  • Have someone design a logo for the program
  • Graphic designers can be found at your local high
    school
  • Make it a contest!
  • Boil things down to a few key points
  • Can you tell someone what you do in the time it
    takes to ride the elevator up a few floors?

43
Write your own guidance materials.
  • Use the US Department of Education Non-Regulatory
    guidance or the NAEHCY FAQ document as a
    guideline
  • Add in state-specific or district-specific laws,
    regulations, and policies
  • Give examples using local program names or
    mention regional situations that may be occurring
    (natural disasters, oil/gas booms, high
    foreclosure areas)
  • Explain to staff how to use district programs and
    data-bases

44
9. Launching a Public Relations Campaign
45
Create Printed Materials
  • Do not reinvent the wheel! Borrow from others
    and make it your own!
  • Always include contact info!
  • Make Posters!
  • Hang them in every school building.
  • Put them in high school bathrooms.
  • Hang them in the community.
  • Create Brochures!
  • Tri-fold brochures are the most effective
  • Limit yourself to a few key points
  • Include key community resources

46
Creating a website
  • Dont bury it! If parents/students cant find
    it quickly, they wont access it
  • Make it informative
  • Explain who qualifies but try not to say
    homeless
  • Clearly explain district/school policies
  • Make it useful
  • Include contact info for enrolling in school
  • Include links to basic community resources
    immunizations, food, shelter, clothing
  • Ask about your districts policies on using
    social media Facebook, Twitter, etc. to get the
    word out

47
Personal Advertising
  • You need business cards! They are the adult
    version of Pokemon (Magic the Gathering, etc.),
    we are all trading them!
  • You need to become the homeless person in
    everyones mind.
  • Give everyone your elevator spiel
  • Hand out your brochures
  • Share information on your Facebook page
  • NAEHCY and NCHE are on Facebook too!

48
Working the Room (Even when it isnt your room.)
  • Talk to everyone, everywhere, all the time!
  • Step out of your comfort zone Remember its all
    about the kids.
  • Look for the connections! (Layers of
    connectivity.)
  • Ask people what they do, who they serve, how they
    serve them?
  • Help other people make connections Its all
    about who you know.
  • Become the point of entry Help your community
    to become a part of your school.

49
Have An Answer for Everything/Everyone
  • Remember that people can be motivated to do the
    same thing for different reasons
  • Why help homeless kids?
  • Faith based group Its the moral thing to do.
    Helping children and the less fortunate is a
    basic tenet of every major world faith
    (Christian, Muslim, Jewish, etc.)
  • Community Its an investment in our future. We
    are helping to raise good citizens.
  • Businesses Its a great community service
    project and free advertising.
  • School Officials It will raise your AYP scores.
    More students will pass the (insert painful
    standardized test name)test. More students will
    graduate

50
10. Building Collaborative Partnerships
51
Know what you need
  • Your community will help you if you are clear
    about your needs
  • Give them data
  • Explain your funding sources (or lack thereof)
  • Explain how you currently use the funds you have
    and the federal/state rules attached to that
    funding
  • Give them a list of needs
  • Break your needs down based on your audience
  • Churches money, gas cards, food cards, places
    to do laundry
  • Businesses mentors, employers, gift cards,
    office supplies
  • Food Bank youth food boxes, summer nutrition,
    weekend food supplements

52
How can we help each other?
  • Remember that everyone has limited resources
  • Be honest about what you can and cant do
  • Always clear it with the chain of command
  • Never make promises!
  • Dont get so focused on leaves that you forget
    they grow on trees and are found in forests!

53
Let no stone go unturned!
  • Get your materials into everyones conference
    packets at any conference where
    kids/families/educators are the focus
  • DPHHS, Social Workers, Title I, School
    Administrators, Church Youth Groups, After-school
    Programs, Day Care, Group Homes
  • Invite other groups to present at your
    conferences for a workshop or as a vendor
  • Ask to present at conferences or set up a
    tabletop display
  • Offer to provide staff training to other agencies
    many agencies look for cross training
    opportunities

54
Next Steps
55
Action Planning
  • Create an action plan for the next year
  • Plan with a group of stakeholders (local
    liaisons, school point-of-contact, community
    groups)
  • Select 4 or 5 actionable steps
  • What is the objective?
  • What steps will you take to achieve it?
  • Who will do them?
  • When will you have it done?

56
Review, Revise, Re-evaluate
  • Never stop improving!
  • At the end of the year go back and check your
    numbers
  • What worked? Why?
  • What didnt work? Why?
  • Where are the gaps? Can you fill them?
  • Look at that stack of business cards. Did you
    forget to get back to someone?

57
Resources and Information
  • The National Center for Homeless Education
    http//center.serve.org/nche/
  • The National Association for the Education of
    Homeless Children and Youth (NAEHCY)
    http//www.naehcy.org/
  • Montana Office of Public Iinstructions Homeless
    Education Program http//opi.mt.gov/Programs/Schoo
    lPrograms/index.html?gpm1_8gpm1_7
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