DO NOT LET THIS HAPPEN TO YOUR HOME! - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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DO NOT LET THIS HAPPEN TO YOUR HOME!

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Kitchen Safety Tips Cook with care. Never leave food cooking unattended. ... High Rise Buildings Know the location of all fire safety devises in your building. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: DO NOT LET THIS HAPPEN TO YOUR HOME!


1
DO NOT LET THIS HAPPEN TO YOUR HOME!
2
FIRE PREVENTION STARTS WITH YOU!
3
Fire Prevention Checks
  • Install smoke alarms near sleeping areas.
    Maintain the regularly.
  • Keep bedroom doors closed at night.
  • Dont smoke in bed.
  • Be sure cigarettes are completely extinguished
    before disposing. Use large, non-
    combustible ashtrays.
  • Keep matches and lighters out of the reach of
    children.
  • Combustible materials, such as oily rags,
    petroleum-based products, etc., should be stored
    in special containers or disposed.
  • Disconnect and repair or discard electrical
    equipment that overheats.
  • Correct possible ignition sources, such as worn
    or frayed extension cords.
  • Exit routes should be unobstructed.
  • Exit lights should be in good working order and
    lighting in corridors and stairwells should be
    adequate.
  • Fire and exit doors and self-closing hardware
    should be in good working order.

4
Smoke Alarms
  • There were 4,045 documented deaths from house
    fires in the U.S. in 2000, according to the NFPA
    (National Fire Protection Association). Through
    94 percent of homes have at least one smoke
    alarm, too often they fail to alert inhabitants
    because of dead or missing batteries.

Improper maintenance is the reason most cited for
smoke alarm failure. To properly maintain a
smoke alarm
  • Test it monthly using the alarms test button
    and/or as recommended by the manufacturer.
  • Replace batteries at least annually, or if the
    alarm makes a chirping sound
  • Change batteries immediately upon moving into a
    new home
  • Never borrow batteries from your alarms for
    other purposes. Many times they dont make it
    back to the detector.
  • The NFPA recommends replacing an alarm every 10
    years.
  • Install a smoke alarm within 15 feet of each
    sleeping area and at the top of major access
    stairways. At a minimum, install one on each
    level of your home.
  • Wall-mounted alarms should be installed so the
    top is 4 to 12 inches from the ceiling.
    Ceiling-mounted units should be installed at
    least 4 inches from any wall.

5
Electrical Safety Tips
  • Plug all heart generating devices directly into
    wall outlets.
  • Dont yank on electrical cords.
  • Dont hang cords over nails, pipes, or with tacks
  • Use only the correct type of fuses in your
    circuit box.
  • Discard frayed wiring.
  • Use listed appliances. Make sure your electrical
    appliances and cords bear the seal of the
    Underwriters Laboratories (UL).
  • Keep small appliances unplugged when not in
    use. Never yank on electrical cords.
  • Do not overload circuits or sockets. Never use
    more than one high-wattage appliance on a circuit
    at a time. Use surge protection outlet bars
    meeting UL 1449 2nd Edition on sensitive
    electronic equipment, and check to make sure the
    device indicates it will not conduct electricity
    when it has failed.
  • Ventilate electronic equipment. Make sure there
    is ample air circulation around TVs, VCRs,
    stereos, computers, especially if they are
    grouped near one another. Keep electronic
    equipment clear of accumulated lint that might
    decrease ventilation and add potential fuel for
    ignition.
  • Do not hide extension cords. Extension cords
    should be in good condition and out in the open
    rather than under rugs, over hooks, or through
    door openings and partitions. Keep kinks out and
    use heavy-duty cord rated for electrical load
    being used. Cords are not meant to replace
    permanent wiring.

6
Kitchen Safety Tips
  • Cook with care. Never leave food cooking
    unattended.
  • Never carry a burning pan because you could
    easily get severely burned and spread the fire
    throughout your home.
  • Do not wear frilly, long-sleeved, or loose
    fitting clothing while cooking.
  • In the event you clothes could catch on fire - -
    stop, drop, and roll.
  • Keep handles turned toward the center of the
    stove to prevent accidental over-turning and out
    of reach of children.
  • Never use water or a fire extinguisher on a
    grease fire it will cause the fire to flair and
    spread the flames. Keep a lid nearby to cover a
    pot or pan and smother the flames in the event of
    a fire.
  • Keep the oven door closed in the event of a fire.
  • Maintain your stove. Keep your stove in good
    condition and clean all grease deposits. Keep
    the cooking area clear of combustible items
    (i.e., rags, pot holders, newspaper, etc.)

7
Fire Extinguisher
Equip your home with an all-purpose class ABC dry
chemical fire extinguisher. Mount extinguishers
close to exits and always keep your back to a
door or exit way should extinguishment fail.
Take a class on extinguisher use and show
everyone in the house how to se them. If you
only have one extinguisher, store it in the
kitchen were files are most likely to occur.
8
Insurance
No matter how many fire prevention measures you
take in your home, there is still a chance that
fire will strike. Make sure you have adequate
insurance protection for your home and personal
property. The best kind or insurance for
virtually everyone is a homeowners or renters
policy. Homeowners insurance provides broad
protection for your home and its contents. I
also protects you in case of theft and includes
coverage for personal liability. You dont have
to be a home owner to get the same kind of
protection. A renters policy provides protection
for your personal liability. Its a good idea to
take an inventory of your personal property long
before a tragedy strikes. Keep the list in a
safe place outside your home. This will make it
much easier for you to compile a list of the
destroyed, damaged, or missing items. Keeping
photographs of each room and the contents is also
an excellent idea.
9
How to Decide if it is Safe to Escape
  • Feel the door for heat with the back of your
    hand.
  • -If it is hot, locate and try the other escape
    route.
  • -If it is not hot, stay law and get out. Close
    the door behind you (to
    compartmentalize the fire).
  • If both escape routes are blocked by fire
    ad heat, stay where you are. Call 911. While
    waiting for help to arrive
  • Wet towel or rags and stuff them into the cracks
    of doors to prevent smoke from entering.
  • If you are in a high rise and can get to a
    window, alert others of your location.
  • Wait for help to arrive.

10
Evacuation Plans
Have a diagram of your home or building.
  • Exits
  • Know where all of your exits are located.
  • Never block your exits.
  • Have at least two ways out of every room.
  • Never use the elevator during a high rise fire.
  • Children, pets, and other valuables should be
    addressed in your evacuation plan.
  • Make prior arrangements for occupants requiring
    assistance.
  • High Rise Buildings
  • Know the location of all fire safety devises in
    your building.
  • Designate or seek volunteers that can act as
    Fire Wardens.
  • Organize by work groups, floors, sections, or
    department.
  • Place copies of the plan throughout your home or
    office where everyone can see it.
  • Designate a safe meeting place outside the
    building
  • Get out and stay out!
  • Use a neighbors phone to call 911.
  • Go to the designated meeting place where
    accounting for occupants is conducted.

Once every plan is completed, practice your plan
at least twice a year so that everyone if
familiar and will be ready in an emergency.
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