Modern Art 109 From mid-19th century to mid-20th century - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Modern Art 109 From mid-19th century to mid-20th century PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 5ba2a4-NmNiO



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Modern Art 109 From mid-19th century to mid-20th century

Description:

... 1946 Gustave Courbet, Self-Portrait with Dog, 1842 Gustave Courbet, The Stone Breakers, 65 x ... Heliograph William Henry Fox Talbot (British,1800-1877 ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:196
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 70
Provided by: Ela32
Learn more at: http://www.csus.edu
Category:
Tags: 19th | 20th | art | century | mid | modern | stone

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Modern Art 109 From mid-19th century to mid-20th century


1
Modern Art 109From mid-19th century to mid-20th
century
  • (left) Édouard Manet (French Realist painter,
    father of the avant-garde), photograph by
    Nadar, 1867
  • (right) Jackson Pollock (American Action
    painter, 1949 Life magazine photo for article,
    Is He the Greatest Living Painter in the United
    States?

2
Realism and the Origin of the Avant-Garde in
Paris
  • Gustave Courbet
  • and
  • Edouard Manet

3
Gustave Courbet (French, 1819-1877)
Self-Portrait, c. 1845
4
Gustave Courbet, The Cellist, Self-Portrait,
1847, Oil on canvas 46 x 35, Nationalmuseum,
Stockholm
5
Gustave Courbet, Portrait of the Artist (Wounded
Man) 1844-54 Oil on canvas 32 x 38, Musée
d'Orsay, Paris
6
Gustave Courbet, Man With a Pipe, 1946
7
Gustave Courbet, Self-Portrait with Dog, 1842
8
Gustave Courbet, The Stone Breakers, 65 x 128,
1849 (destroyed in the British bombing of
Dresden, 1945, WW II)"It is not often that one
encounters so complete an expression of poverty
and so, right then and there I got the idea for a
painting. I told them to come to my studio the
next morning."
9
Gustave Courbet, Portrait of Proudhon and his
Children, 1853 Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, member
of Parliament, admired by Courbet, first person
to call himself an anarchist. Anarchy is Order
Without Power
Anarchy is Order Without Power
10
Gustave Courbet, A Burial at Ornans 1849-1850,
oil on canvas, 10' 3 x 21' 9, Musée d'Orsay,
Paris. Shown in salon of 1950What is
avant-garde about this painting in form and
content?
11
Thomas Couture (French Academic painter,
1815-1879)Romans of the Decadence, c. 15 x 25
ft, 1847 (salon of 1847)
12
Gustave Courbet, Burial at Ornans, 1849 compare
with Thomas Couture, Romans of the Decadence,
1847
13
Jean-Baptiste-Siméon Chardin, Grace at Table,
1740 (19"/15") Louvre, Paris Genre painting was
a traditional category in European academies of
art, which enforced a strict hierarchy of genres
that determined a paintings value first
history, then portrait painting followed by
genre, landscape, and still life. Note
relatively small size of Chardins painting.
Courbets Burial at Ornans is 10' 3 x 21' 9"
14
William Bouguereau(left) Mother and Children,
The Rest, 1879 (right) Home from the Harvest,
1878, Cummer Museum of Art, Jacksonville, Florida
15
Honoré Daumier (French) , Third Class Carriage,
o/c, 1862, c. 25 x 35"
16
Honoré Daumier, The Uprising, 1849, oil on canvas
17
Gustave Courbet, The Studio An Allegory of Seven
Years of the Artist's Life, 1855, oil on canvas,
over 20 feet wide, Musée d'Orsay, Paris
18
  • I have studied, outside of any system and
    without prejudice, the art of the ancients and of
    the Moderns. I no more wanted to imitate the one
    than to copy the other nor, furthermore, was it
    my intuition to attain the trivial goal of art
    for art's sake. No! I simply wanted to draw
    forth from a complete acquaintance with tradition
    the reasoned and independent consciousness of my
    own individuality"
  • "To know in order to be able to create, that was
    my idea. To be in a position to translate the
    customs, the ideas, the appearance of my epoch,
    according to my own estimation to be not only a
    painter, but a man as well in short, to create
    living art - this is my goal.
  • Gustave Courbet, statement for his Pavilion of
    Realism,
  • build next to the Paris International Exhibition
    of 1855

19
(left) Destruction of Paris following the
Franco-Prussian war, siege of Paris, and (right)
the Commune 1871, Communards shot by firing squad
of French soldiers in the streets of Paris
20
Courbet, the Communard, and the destruction of
the Vendome column, symbol of Napoleonic (French)
imperialism"Inasmuch as the Vendôme column is a
monument devoid of all artistic value, tending to
perpetuate by its expression the ideas of war and
conquest of the past imperial dynasty, which are
reproved by a republican nation's sentiment,
citizen Courbet expresses the wish that the
National Defense government will authorise him to
disassemble this column. Courbet
21
Gustave Courbet, Self-Portrait at Sainte-Pelagie,
1872 Last self-portrait as prisoner (6 months)
for Communard activities.
22
Henri Fantin-Latour. Portrait of Édouard Manet.
1867, oil on canvasArt Institute of Chicago,
ChicagoParisian dandy, flaneur, and Painter of
Modern Life
23
Édouard Manet, At the Café, lithograph, 1869
24
Édouard Manet, Concert at the Tuileries, 1862
o/c, c. 46 x 30, National Gallery, London. Two
portraits of Charles Baudelaire by Manet on left,
1865
Modernity is the transient, the fleeting, the
contingent it is one half of art, the other
being the eternal and the immovable. -
Charles Baudelaire
25
Édouard Manet, Le Dejeuner Sur LHerb (The
Luncheon on the Grass), 1862
26
Titian or Giorgione, Concert Champêtre (Italian
Renaissance) 1510 compare with Édouard Manet
(French Realism), Le Déjeuner Sur LHerbe, 1862
27
Marcantonio Raimondi (Italian Renaissance
printmaker,1480-1534, Judgment of Paris (detail
of engraving after Raphael), 1520 compare with
Édouard Manet, Déjeuner Sur LHerbe, 1862
28
Édouard Manet, Olympia, 1863, oil on canvas, 51 x
74¾ inMusée d'Orsay, Paris
29
(left) Titian or Giorgione, Venus of Urbino, 1510
(Louvre) source for Manets Olympia 1863
30
Alexandre Cabanel (French Academic Painter,
1823-1889) The Birth of Venus, 51 x 88 inches,
1863
31
Jean-Léon Gérôme (French Academic painter),
Phrynee Before the Judges, 1861Honoré Daumier
cartoon Venuses Again, Always Venuses
32
William Bouguereau, Birth of Venus, 1879 and Paul
Baudry, Venus and Cupid, c. 1857
33
(No Transcript)
34
(No Transcript)
35
Édouard Manet, Universal Exposition of 1867,
1867, o/c, Nasjonalgalleriet, Oslo, Norway
Watch a fascinating 7-minute video of the
2011conservation of this painting
http//www.youtube.com/watch?vZSmE2842fm0
The Painter of Modern Life
36
Emperor Napoleon III by Hipolyte Flandrin (Salon
of 1863) with Plan of Paris radical urban
renewal of Paris 1853-1869 designed by Baron
Haussmann,
37
1867 Paris International Exhibition
38
Napoleon III and Baron Haussmanns urban renewal
of Paris1853-1869
Contemporary view of Blvd. Haussman with
Galeries Lafayette, one of the first department
stores commodity culture
39
Édouard Manet, Civil War in Paris (the Commune)
1871, lithograph
40
Édouard Manet, The Bar at the Folies Bergère, 38
x 51 in, 1881, Courtauld, London
41
(left) Gustave Courbet, Portrait of Jo, the
Beautiful Irish Girl, c. 1865, oil on canvas, 21
x 26 in. Nationalmuseum, Stockholm,
Realism(right) James McNeil Whistler (US),
Symphony in White, 1864, Japonisme, aestheticism.
Same model, Jo Hiffernan
42
James McNeill Whistler (United States expatriate)
Nocturne in Black and Gold The Falling Rocket,
c. 1875, oil on panel, 23 x 18 in, Detroit
Institute of ArtsOh, I knock one off in a
couple of days. (Whistler)Why is a painting
made so quickly so highly valued?What are the
issues around art for arts sake raised by the
Whistler vs. John Ruskin trial? How are they
modern?
43
  • Modernity is the transitory, the fugitive, the
    contingent, the half of art, of which the other
    half is the eternal and the immutable. . . .
  • Charles Baudelaire

Architecture as Emblem of Modernity
44
Top Joseph Paxton, The Crystal Palace, Hyde
Park, London, 1851Below right Charles Barry
(17951860) A. W. N Pugin (181252), Houses of
Parliament, London, Gothic Revivalism, largely
completed by 1858
Contemporaneous English buildings one emblematic
of the future, one emblematic of the past.
45
The House of Lords in the Palace of Westminster
(Houses of Parliament), London, designed by
A.W.N. Pugin. Neo-Gothic interior design
46
Britains Queen Victoria reigned from 1837 to
1901 Her name and values identify the Victorian
era in Europe
Edwin Landseer (British), Windsor Castle in
Modern Times, 1841-5, oil on canvas 44 x 56
Victoria and Albert at home
Roger Fenton (British, 18191869) The Queen and
the Prince, wet plate 1854
47
The Great Exhibition of 1851 in the Crystal
Palace by Joseph Paxton architect, Hyde Park,
London, England 1851, moved to Sydenham in 1852,
burned down in 1936
48
(No Transcript)
49
Queen Victoria opens the Great Exhibition in the
Crystal Palace in Hyde Park, London in 1851
50
Joseph Paxton, Crystal Palace, 1851, detail of
exterior structure
51
Building the Crystal Palace with prefabricated
truss
52
Building The Crystal Palace from prefabricated
iron parts
53
Waiting for the Queen, Orientalist décor of
Crystal Palace, Illustration by Joseph Nash for
Dickinson's Comprehensive Pictures of the Great
Exhibition of 1851
Ornamental cover for joints of girders
(disguising modernity)
54
Cartoon from Punch, British satirical magazine
55
Crystal Palace Science Exhibit- Envelope Machine
56
Compare bed and new railroad cars exhibited at
Great Exhibition of 1851 (Crystal Palace)
57
Silver table top sculpture shown in Great
Exhibition of 1851Victorian Orientalism and
machine made populist art of the industrial
age.
http//digital.films.com.proxy.lib.csus.edu/Portal
ViewVideo.aspx?xtid39857
58
Announcing the invention of photography (the
daguerreotype) at The Joint Meeting of the
Academies of Science and Fine Arts in the
Institute of France, Paris, August 19, 1839,
unsigned engraving
59
Louis Jacques Mande Daguerre, Still Life, 1837,
Daguerreotype
60
Louis Jacques Mande Daguerre, Boulevard du
Temple, Paris, c. 1838, Daguerreotype
61
Joseph Nicéphore Niépce (French1765-1833), View
from His Window at Le Gras1826 -7, Heliograph
62
William Henry Fox Talbot (British,1800-1877),The
Open Door, 1843. salted paper print from a
calotype negative, plate IV, The Pencil of
Nature, 1844-46
63
Talbot, Courtyard Scene,1844, Calotype
64
Oscar Gustav Rejlander (Swedish 1813-75) Two Ways
of Life, 1857albumen print, composite of 32
negatives
65
William Holman Hunt, The Awakening Conscience,
1853-4 o/c, arched top, 30/22 Tate Britain,
Pre-Raphaelite
66
William Morris (British, 1834-1896) La Belle
Iseult, 1858, Jane Burden (future Jane Morris) in
medieval dress, Pre-Raphaelite. Morriss only
surviving oil painting, Tate, London. Medieval
story of Iseult mourning Tristran's exile from
the court of King Mark
67
Red House designed by Philip Webb for William and
Jane Morris. Designed 1859 completed 1860.
Bexley heath (near London). neo-Gothic
eclecticism, meant to be a palace of art for
artists and writers associated with the
Pre-Raphaelite Movement. Inspiration for the
Arts Crafts movement and the assertion of
anauthentically English tradition. The interior
surfaces of the Red House were covered with
pattern floors, walls, ceilings.
http//www.victorianweb.org/art/architecture/webb/
1c.html
68
William Morris, Pimpernel wallpaper, 1876. For
repeating pattern on wallpaper and fabric, Morris
used the ancient technique of hand woodblock
printing. http//www.antiques.tv/video/historic-
houses-red-house-(part2),28
69
William Morris, designer, pages from The
Kelmscott Chaucer (14th century texts), finished
in 1896, figures by Pre-Raphaelite painter,
Edward Burne-Jones
About PowerShow.com