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Working Together for a Healthy Ocean Grantmakers of Oregon and SW Washington January 18, 2006

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Title: Slide 1 Author: Carolyn Waldron Last modified by: aaron Created Date: 1/23/2006 7:59:10 PM Document presentation format: On-screen Show Company – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Working Together for a Healthy Ocean Grantmakers of Oregon and SW Washington January 18, 2006


1
Working Together for a Healthy
OceanGrantmakers of Oregon and SW
WashingtonJanuary 18, 2006
2
Who, What, Why
  • Who is Oregon Ocean
  • Whats the Problem An Ocean in Crisis
  • A 21st Century Opportunity Create an Ocean Ethic
  • Protect Special Places Ecosystem Approach
  • One Remedy Marine Protected Areas
  • Our Legacy Extending Beach Bill to
  • Marine Waters

3
Our Ocean A Priceless Resource
  • The oceans are our largest public resourcean
    area 23 larger than our nations
  • land area
  • Yet, less than 1 of our nations oceans, and
    none of Oregons ocean are protected

4
(No Transcript)
5
Working Together
  • WHO IS OREGON OCEAN?
  • A statewide alliance of
  • conservation organizations and science and
    communications partners

6
A Statewide Alliance
  • Formed in 2004, Launched in 2005
  • 7 State and National Conservation Members
  • 7 Advisory Council Partners
  • Carolyn Waldron, Director
  • Paul Engelmeyer, OPAC Liaison

7
Conservation Members
  • Audubon Society of Portland
  • Conservation Leaders Network
  • Natural Resources Defense Council
  • Oceana
  • Oregon Shores Conservation Coalition
  • Oregon State Public Interest Research Group
  • Surfrider Foundation

8
Advisory Council
  • COMPASSCommunication Partnership for Science
  • and the Sea
  • PISCOPartnership for Interdisciplinary Studies
    on Coastal Oceans
  • Green Fire Productions
  • Resource Media
  • The Nature Conservancy
  • Coast Range Association
  • Pacific Marine Conservation Council

9
Partners
  • The Lazar Foundation (Oregon)
  • Meyer Memorial Trust (Oregon)
  • David and Lucile Packard Foundation (Calif)
  • The Bullitt Foundation (Washington)
  • The Harder Foundation (Washington)

10
Mission and Goals
  • Mission Statement
  • Oregon Ocean is a statewide alliance
  • promoting the protection and restoration of
  • marine life and habitat for a healthy ocean,
  • thriving communities and our childrens future.

11
(No Transcript)
12
Oceans in Crisis
  • WHATS THE PROBLEM?
  • Collapse of West Coast Groundfish Fishery
  • -- largest fishery closure in US history
  • Beach Closures
  • Seabird Die-offs
  • Sedementation/Water Pollution
  • Dead Zones
  • Loss of Biodiversity

13
Why Care?
  • HUMAN SERVICES
  • Weather
  • Water Quality
  • Transportation
  • Energy
  • Food Aesthetic Value
  • Medicines Play / Rejuvenation

14
Why Care?
  • MORAL IMPERATIVE
  • Intrinsic Value of Marine Life and
  • Ocean Resources
  • - Wildlife Invertebrates/Anemones/Coral
    (starfish, barnacles, sponges, crabs),
  • Fish, Pelagic Birds, Mammals (whales)

15
Photo courtesy of Ben Nieves
16
Oceans in Peril
  • Once considered inexhaustible and resilient, we
    now know the ocean is finite and fragile
  • Sweeping changes are needed in coastal,
  • ocean protection

17
National Call to Action
  • Pew Oceans Commission (May 2003)
  • Americas Living Oceans Charting a Course
  • for Sea Change
  • U.S. Commission on Oceans (July 2004)
  • An Ocean Blueprint for the 21st Century
  • Joint Ocean Commission (Oct. 2005)
  • www.joint oceanscommission.org

18
Be Bold
  • Develop an Ocean Ethic in Oregon
  • Marine parks and wildlife refuges
  • Harness current regional, national, and
    international momentum driving urgent need for a
    new ocean policy ethos
  • Extend Beach Bill legacy into ocean waters
  • All 362 miles of ocean beaches are public access
    recreation areas

19

20
Biodiversity Crisis
  • Stemming the biodiversity crisis is
  • credibly one of the most important
  • social movements of our time.

21
Create an Ocean Ethic
  • OUR AMBITION
  • Protect Special Places
  • Conserve Significant Marine Habitat Areas
  • - spawning grounds, nursery areas,
  • biodiversity hotspots
  • Just as we have done on the landscape by setting
  • aside national / state parks and wildlife refuges

22
  • Photo courtesy of Ben Nieves

23
Protect Marine Habitat
  • Conserve and recover full range of native
    biological diversity in Oregons nearshore waters
    and coastal shore
  • Habitat designation and other methods
  • permanent protection of ecological values and
    representative habitat areas

24
Protect Special Places
  • Heceta Head to Heceta Banks, Astoria Canyon,
  • Cape Blanco to Port Orford Reef
  • Protect the Columbia River Gorge,
  • Wallowa Mountains, Mt. Hood of
  • Oregons Ocean

25
Science-Policy
  • Help identify significant marine habitat areas
    for conservation and protection
  • Apply best available science and technologies to
    protect marine biodiversity
  • (govt, NGO, academic collaboration)
  • Establish creative policy solutions

26
Ecosystem-based Management
  • The cornerstone of a new vision for healthy,
    productive, resilient marine ecosystems
  • Described by exerts as
  • A comprehensive, integrated approach that
    considers the entire ecosystem, including
    humans.
  • provide stable fisheries, abundant wildlife,
    clean beaches,
  • vibrant coastal communities and healthy
    seafood.
  • COMPASS, Scientific Consensus Statement on
    Marine Ecosystem-Based Management, March 21, 2005

27
A Holistic Approach
  • Ecosystem-based management
  • Differs from current approaches that usually
    focus on a single-species , sector, activity or
    concern
  • Instead, considers the cumulative impacts of
    different sectors

28
Comprehensive Marine Management
  • Specifically, EBM
  • Acknowledges interconnectedness among systems,
    such as between air, land and sea and
  • Integrates ecological, social, economic, and
    institutional perspectives, recognizing their
    strong interdependences

29
Comprehensive and Ecosystem-based
  • Adoption of a comprehensive strategy for
    sustaining Oregons coastal and ocean resources
  • - Strategic action plan for instituting
    ecosystem- based management / Meyer Memorial
    Trust
  • - Marine biodiversity conservation planning /
    OSU

30
Photo courtesy of Ben Nieves
31
The Challenge Hypertrophic Hubris
  • Human behavior is centered in a
  • discontinuity between peoples ability to act
    and our ability to understand the consequences of
    our actions

32
Threats to Ocean Health
  • Global Climate Change
  • Overfishing
  • Invasive Species
  • Coastal Development Habitat Degradation
  • Land Use Impacts Water Pollution

33
Global Climate Change
  • 2006 warmest year on record
  • Past 9 years warmest of last 25
  • Warmer ocean water
  • Sea-level rise

34
Overfishing
  • Pew Oceans Commission (2003)
  • Americas Living Oceans Charting a Course for
  • Sea Change
  • U.S. Commission on Oceans (2004)
  • An Ocean Blueprint for the 21st Century
  • United Nations
  • Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (2005)
  • Worm, et al, Science (2006)

35
Overfishing
  • Race to Fish is driven by fishery mgmnt
    policies (overcapitalization, overharvesting,
    bycatch)
  • Divide the spoils rather than conserve resource
  • --ancient argument over freedom of the sea
  • Hypertrophic perspective has crippled efforts
  • to implement protective policies

36
Restore the Bounty
  • Protect the Habitat
  • One Remedy Marine Reserves and
  • Marine Protected Areas

37
Our Ocean, Our Future
  • Marine reserves
  • places in the ocean that are completely and
    permanently protected from uses that remove
    animals and plants or alter their habitats.
    (PISCO)

38
Marine Protected Areas
  • Marine protected areas are tools that can be used
    to achieve specific management goals
  • -marine wildlife refuges and marine sanctuaries
  • -marine parks and recreation areas
  • -wildlife management areas
  • -research-only areas

39
Photo courtesy of Ben Nieves
40
Marine Reserves
  • Scientific data show that marine reserves have
    bigger fish and more fish and significantly
    greater species diversity
  • Established marine reserves have yielded three
    essential results

41
Recovering the Bounty
  • 1. Increased abundance of life
  • 3Xs as many plants and animals
  • 2. Size of organisms significantly increased
  • on average, fish and other animals and plants
    size increased by over 80 and

42
Recovering the Bounty
  • 3. Increased number of species
  • 70 increase, on avg., in species diversity
  • Spillover to adjacent waters animals move to
    other areas outside of reserves and positively
    impact fisheries and ecosystems

43
An Oregonian Solution
  • Create an economically viable and ecologically
    sustainable plan for Oregons ocean
  • Local action to protect our ocean will bring
  • local benefits

44
A New Ocean Ethic
  • Dry Tortugas Ecological Reserve, FL 2001
  • - 150 square nautical miles
  • Marine Life Protection Act 2006
  • - 18 of Central CA protected
  • NW Hawaiian Islands National Monument 2006
  • - 140,000 square miles

45
Oregons Ocean
  • One thing that most people dont appreciate is
    the phenomenal diversity of species that we have
    off our shores in Oregon. This is one of the
    richest temperate marine ecosystems in the entire
    world. We just have a wealth of plants and
    animals.- Jane Lubchenco, distinguished
    professor of zoology, Oregon State University

46
Photos courtesy of Ben Nieves
47
Its the Habitat
  • Restore and Protect the Habitat
  • Protect Special Places
  • Conserve Significant Habitat Areas

48
An Ocean Ethic
  • Establish Marine Protected Areas
  • Marine Conservation Areas
  • Marine Parks / Recreation Areas
  • Wildlife Management Areas
  • Sanctuary Preservation Areas
  • Research-only Reserves

49
Its the Habitat
  •  All organisms need a place to live. Thats
    their habitat. So if the habitat goes, so does
    the organism. Its as simple as that. - Oregon
    State Universitys Mark Hixon, M.A.,
  • in the documentary film, Common Ground Oregons
    Ocean

50
Its the Habitat
  • As Federal Ocean Commissioner
  • William Ruckelshaus puts it,
  • "A healthy ecosystem has healthy fish stocks."
  •  

51
  • Photo courtesy of Ben Nieves

52
Extending the Beach Bill to Marine Waters
  • Visionary / Bold
  • 1913 Governor West Public Coast Hwy
  • 1967 Governor McCall Beach Bill
  • 2001-2006 Marine Ecological Reserves
  • 2006 West Coast Governors Agreement
  • 2007? Oregons Ocean Our Legacy
  •  

53
Photo courtesy of Ben Nieves
54
Our Ocean, Our Future
  • Its time to get smart about a
  • healthy ocean.
  • YES WE CAN !

55
Working Together for a Healthy Ocean
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