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GOOD NUTRITION NOW

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GOOD NUTRITION NOW GOOD HEALTH LATER OHSU Heart Research Center % of Men and Women who Died of Heart Disease in One County of England (1989) 100% 0 Weight at ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: GOOD NUTRITION NOW


1
GOOD NUTRITION NOW GOOD HEALTH LATER


OHSU Heart Research Center
2
Present Titles and Responsibilities Director
Heart Research Center (1994-present) Associate
Chief of Cardiovascular Medicine for Research
(2005- present)
3
Oregon Health Science University Current
Primary Appointments 1973-2005 Department of
Physiology/Pharmacology Instructor, Asst
Professor, Associate Professor, Professor 2005-
Present Dept of Medicine, Division of
Cardiovascular Medicine Joint Appointments
1--Departments of Obstetrics Gynecology
(Pregnancy and Womens Health) 2--Anesthesiology
Peri-operative Medicine, (Anesthesia and Pain
medicine) 3--Medical Informatics and Clinical
Epidemiology, (Medical Information and Studies on
People) 4--Biomedical Engineering (Engineering
applied to biology and medicine)
4
Education George Fox University, Oregon, B.A.
Louis Calder Scholar Oregon State University,
Ph.D. NDEA Fellow Mentor Howard Hillemann
(student of Professor Harland Mossman) Oregon
Health and Science University NIH Postdoctoral
Fellow 1971-1973 Mentor Job Faber, MD/PhD
Cardiovascular Physiology (Studied Basic
Medical Sciences plus advanced mathematics) Mini-
Postdoctoral Studies Eric Shabtach Electron
microscopy, University of Oregon, Eugene Allen
Enders Placental morphology, Washington
University, St Louis Sabbatical Fulbright
Scholar, 1990 Molecular Embryology Paul
Sharpe, University of Manchester
5
Research Interests
College I became interested in embryo and
fetal development from Taking an embryology and
development class. Graduate School I became
interested in fetal organ function Heart
Development and Function (Physiology)
Placental Function Postdoctoral Studies I
studied medicine, heart and blood vessel
function, placental transport Career I focused
my studies on the development of the heart before
birth and the biology of pregnancy I developed
expertise on the early life origins of heart
disease and diabetes
6
BACKGROUND
  • THE USA HEALTH REPORT CARD
  • WHAT DOES DECLINING HEALTH LEAD TO?
  • WHY IS OUR HEALTH WORSENING?
  • WHAT IS A GOOD DIET?
  • WHAT CAN WE DO?

7
The Genes of American Families
Will she grow tall? Will she have healthy
babies? Will he or she get heart disease? Will
her children get diabetes?
8
  • Americas Health Report Card
  • Sedentary Screen Viewing
  • Gaining Height
  • Maintaining Weight in Healthy Range

9
Fact 1
Adults have an 11 increase in risk for heart
attack for each hour/day increase in average TV
viewing (Circulation, Jan 26, 2010)
Fact 2
National Institutes of Health Report People aged
8 to 18 average 4 hours per day TV/DVD viewing 1
hour video games 1 hour computer time
10
  • Americas Health Report Card
  • Sedentary Screen Viewing
  • Gaining Height
  • Maintaining Weight in Healthy Range
  • D

11
HEIGHT
Americans have been getting taller since the
Civil War Height is a marker for overall
nutrition However, Americans are gaining height
more slowly than Europeans
Height is associated with economic and
academic success. African American women have
been getting shorter over the last decade.
12
  • Americas Health Report Card
  • Sedentary Screen Viewing
  • Gaining Height
  • Maintaining Weight in Healthy Range
  • Increasing Birthweight over Time

D
  • C

13
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1989
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs. overweight for 5 4
person)
No Data lt10 1014
14
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1990
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs. overweight for 5 4
person)
No Data lt10 1014
15
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1992
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs. overweight for 5 4
person)
No Data lt10 1014
1519
16
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1993
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs. overweight for 5 4
person)
No Data lt10 1014
1519
17
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1995
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs. overweight for 5 4
person)
No Data lt10 1014
1519
18
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1997
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs. overweight for 5 4
person)
No Data lt10 1014
1519 20
19
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1999
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs. overweight for 5 4
person)
No Data lt10 1014
1519 20
20
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2001
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs. overweight for 5 4
person)
No Data lt10 1014
1519 2024 25
21
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2002
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs. overweight for 5 4
person)
No Data lt10 1014
1519 2024 25
22
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2003
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs. overweight for 5 4
person)
No Data lt10 1014
1519 2024 25
23
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2004
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs. overweight for 5 4
person)
No Data lt10 1014
1519 2024 25
24
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2005
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs. overweight for 5 4
person)
No Data lt10 1014
1519 2024 2529
30
25
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2006
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs. overweight for 5 4
person)
No Data lt10 1014
1519 2024 2529
30
26
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2007
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs. overweight for 5 4
person)
No Data lt10 1014
1519 2024 2529
30
27
  • Americas Health Report Card
  • Sedentary Screen Viewing
  • Gaining Height
  • Maintaining Weight in Healthy Range

D
C
  • F


These and other factors suggest that the health
of the American population is worsening We
should be concerned
28
  • THE USA REPORT CARD
  • WHAT DOES DECLINING HEALTH LEAD TO?
  • WHY IS OUR HEALTH WORSENING?
  • WHAT IS A GOOD DIET?
  • WHAT CAN WE DO?

29
African American Women ---Have a higher risk
for heart disease than any other ethnic group in
the USA ---Have more diabetes and high blood
pressure ---Have not been included in research
trials as often as Caucasian women ---Receive
less aggressive diagnostic testing
More women than men die of heart disease/stroke M
en die younger 10X more women die of heart
disease than of breast cancer Women often
have different symptoms than men. Women are
less likely to seek emergency care
30
Age Adjusted Average Annual Heart Deaths per
100,000 by County 2000-2006
200-500 600-800
5 Fold variation across counties
31
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32
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33
  • THE USA REPORT CARD
  • WHAT DOES DECLINING HEALTH LEAD TO?
  • WHY IS OUR HEALTH WORSENING?
  • What have we learned from research?

34
Programming 101
of Men and Women who Died of Heart Disease in
One County of England (1989)
David Barker, MD,PhD
100 0
5.0
9.5 11.0
Weight at Birth (pounds)
35
High Risk for Diabetes with Birthweight
Risk of Diabetes In Men
Risk ratio 81 in 5.5lb babies
Hales Barker ,BMB 2001
36
razzysmom.blogspot.com/
The early embryo received signals from its
mother during its journey down the oviduct
37
Cell Numbers are set by nutrition- dependent
chemical signals (Flemming)
Fetal body
Placenta
Many genes potential for epigenetic regulation
Placenta and chorionic sac with 36 mm human
embryo Hamilton, Boyd and Mossman, 1978
38
Why is Americas Health Failing??????
  • The Perfect Storm (3 weather fronts that collide)
  • Cheap available high calorie good tasting
  • food (salt, fat, sugar) with few nutrients
  • (high calorie malnutrition)
  • Decreased physical exercise (nitric oxide fuel
    consumption)
  • PROGRAMMING How growth before birth
  • makes a person likely to get diseases as an
    adult.

39
The Biological Roots of Chronic Disease are
Transgenerational
100 Years of Nutritional Flow
Father
Grandmother------Mother----------Placenta------Fet
us---------Infant---------Child
-Made egg -Donated genes -Wombed fetus
Nursed mother Ate Food Grew Fat or
Thin Cardiovascular Disease Vulnerability
-Donated egg -Donated Genes -Provided the
nutrients -Influenced the placenta -Wombed the
fetus -Delivered the baby -Nursed the
baby -Stimulated the baby -Fed the child
-Transported nutrients -Produced
molecules -Provided resistance -Exported wastes
-Made placenta -Took nutrients -Made organs
-Grew body
1000 Days
40
High Risk Outcomes In Low Birthweight Adults

Too Much Appetite Insulin too high Excess Blood
Sugar Abnormal Blood Fats Blood Vessel
Malfunction High Blood Pressure Heart
Failure Blood Clots too Easily Reduced immune
function Increased Nervousness Osteoporosis
(Thin Bones)
-- Obesity
Heart Disease
41
Cholesterol
Metabolic Syndrome
Coagulation
Heart and vessels
ANS
Blood Pressure
CNS Appetite
Low/High Term Birth Weight
Kidney
Glucose
Insulin
Psycho- social
Pancreas
Muscle
Immune Function
Bone

42
  • Young men need good nutrition because
  • It protects against heart disease and type 2
    diabetes
  • It provides fuel for physical activity
  • 3) It improves brain function.
  • It builds an attractive body.
  • It may affect their offspring


43
  • Young women need good nutrition because
  • It protects against heart disease and type 2
    diabetes
  • It provides fuel for physical activity
  • 3) It improves brain function.
  • 4) It builds an attractive body.
  • 5) It promotes life long health in offspring.
  • 6) The health of the American population tomorrow
  • depends on the bodies of todays young
    women.


44
You were born with vulnerabilities for
disease based on your pre-birth nutrition and
the genes you inherited from your parents.
But Good Nutrition Can Prevent Most Heart and
Blood Vessel Disease The benefit never goes away
45
  • THE USA REPORT CARD
  • WHAT DOES DECLINING HEALTH LEAD TO?
  • WHY IS OUR HEALTH WORSENING?
  • WHAT IS A GOOD DIET?
  • WHAT CAN WE DO?

46
What is wrong with our diet? Too many calories
(High calorie malnutrition) Too much sugar Too
much animal fat Too little omega 3 fats
(fish) Too few fruits and vegetables Too little
variety
47
Easy Features of a Healthy Diet
3 items to include 3 items to avoid
Balanced and Varied INCLUDE 1-Grains,
fruits/vegetables 2-Plant oils (like olive oil)
3-Fish or fish oil SPARINGLY 1-Cholesterol and
saturated fat (red meat and dairy fat)
2-Excess sugar 3- Transfats, hydrogenated oil
48
1965 advertisement in LIFE magazine
49
  • THE USA REPORT CARD
  • WHAT DOES DECLINING HEALTH LEAD TO?
  • WHY IS OUR HEALTH WORSENING?
  • WHAT IS A GOOD DIET?
  • WHAT CAN WE DO?

50
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51
Conclusion Impact of Growth on Type 2 Diabetes
Prevention begins in Childhood
The incidence of type 2 diabetes could be
reduced by 60 and The incidence of high
blood pressure by 25 if all fetuses had balanced
nutrition
Barker, Eriksson, Forsen, and Osmond, Int J
Epidemiol, 2002
The question remains How can we work together to
stem the tide of obesity, diabetes and heart
disease???
52
CONGRESS 2011
7th World Congress on Developmental Origins of
Health and Disease
September 18-21, 2011 PORTLAND, OREGON
USA Marriott Portland, Downtown Waterfront
OHSU Heart Research Center Greater Oregon March
of Dimes DOHAD International Society
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