The New Immigration - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – The New Immigration PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 5906fb-ZmY5M



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

The New Immigration

Description:

The New Immigration Who Were the New Immigrants? Those immigrants who came to the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. 1860/1880/1890 until 1920. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:216
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 88
Provided by: mwe49
Learn more at: http://www.humbleisd.net
Category:
Tags: addams | immigration | jane | new

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: The New Immigration


1
The New Immigration
2
Who Were the New Immigrants?
  • Those immigrants who came to the United States in
    the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
  • 1860/1880/1890 until 1920. depending upon
    historians view point.

3
Who were the OLD Immigrants?
4
The first immigrants
Those who had traveled across the land bridge
that once connected North America and Asia
5
The first immigrants from the Old World
  • Columbus Spanish
  • The conquistadores
  • missionaries
  • The English
  • Virginia Company
  • Puritans
  • Quakers
  • The Dutch
  • traders
  • The French
  • Fur trappers
  • missionaries
  • African slaves

6
Old Immigrants

7
Old Immigrants IMMIGRANTS PRIOR TO 1890
  • Primarily from Western Northern Europe
  • They came from
  • Ireland
  • Germany
  • England
  • Wales
  • Scotland

8
Irish immigration
  • In Ireland, the potato famine was wreaking havoc.
    Across the rest of the continent, the economy was
    changing. Big landowners pushed peasants off
    their land. New factories made craftsmen obsolete

9
German immigration
  • Irish and German immigrants, who were seeking to
    escape from wars, economic dislocations and
    religious and ethnic discrimination in their own
    countries, were attracted to the City by the
    abundant demand for unskilled labor and the
    militant commitment of the democratic party to
    Democratic equality.

10
The New Immigration
The greatest free migration of people in human
history 1880-1920 During these years
approximately 20 million Europeans immigrate to
the United States.
11
What were the Reasons the New Immigrants came to
the United States?
  • Hope for a better life.
  • To escape poverty. To find employment.
  • To escape famine and land shortages in Europe.
  • The chance to own land in America.
  • To escape religious persecution.
  • To escape political persecution.

12
The New Immigrants came from
  • Southern and Eastern Europe
  • Italy
  • Russia
  • Austria-Hungary
  • Poland
  • Greece
  • Turkey
  • Romania
  • Ireland

13
The New Immigrants also came from
  • Asia
  • China
  • Japan
  • Latin America
  • Mexico
  • Caribbean nations

14
European Immigrants
15
European Immigrants Escaping Religious Persecution
  • Thousands of European Jews immigrated to the
    United States to escape POGROMS in Russia
    Poland.
  • Anti-Semitism
  • Religious persecution of the Jewish people

16
European Immigrants
  • Left Europes rigid social class system
  • Came to America where a person could better their
    social/economic status.

17
European Immigrants
  • L A N D
  • Immigrants left Europe because a lack of
    available farm land to gain.
  • The United States offered the possibility of
    owning LAND.
  • Homestead Act of 1862.

18
European Immigrants
  • R E F O R M
  • Progressive and democratic reforms taking place
    in the United States inspired Europeans to come
    to have a greater say in how they are governed
    and to live better lives.
  • Old Monarchies and Political Turmoil in Europe
    dismayed many younger Europeans who felt there
    was no chance for change.

19
Birds of Passage
20
Chinese Immigrants
21
Why Chinese Immigrants came to Gold Mountain
  • California Gold Rush (1850s)
  • Work on Transcontinental Railroad and railroad
    building.
  • Work on farms and in mines in the West.
  • To operate businesses in America.

22
Chinese Immigration
  • Peak years of immigration was 1851-1883
  • Approximately 200,000 Chinese Immigrants enter
    the United States.

23
Reaction to Chinese Immigrants
  • During difficult economic times of 1870s,
    unemployed Americans targeted their anger against
    Chinese labors who they saw as taking their
    jobs.
  • Anti-Chinese riots broke out in a number of
    cites.

24
(No Transcript)
25
(No Transcript)
26
(No Transcript)
27
(No Transcript)
28
The Chinese Exclusion Act Banned all Chinese
Laborers. Only Chinese allowed to enter the
United States were 1) students, 2) teachers, 3)
merchants, 4) government officials, and 5)
tourists.
29
Angel Island
30
Thomas Nast cartoons on Chinese Immigration
31
Thomas Nast on Chinese Immigration
  • Every Dog (No Distinction of Color )has his
    Day.
  • Red Gentleman to Yellow Gentleman. Pale face
    fraid you crowd him out, as he did me

32
And Still They Come
33
Japanese Immigrants
34
Japanese Immigration
  • Japanese were recruited to work on Hawaiian fruit
    and sugar plantations.
  • When Hawaii became a United States territory
    allowed opened up Japanese immigration to the
    West Coast of the United States.
  • By 1920, approximately 200,000 Japanese
    immigrants living on the West Coast of the United
    States.

35
San Francisco School Board Incident The
Gentlemens Agreement
36
Immigrants from the West Indies
  • Between 1880 and 1920, more than 260,000 West
    Indians immigrated to the United States.
  • Jamaica, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Haiti, the Dominican
    Republic and other islands.
  • Jobs. Jobs. Jobs.
  • Settled largely in Florida, New Orleans, Gulf
    states, and NEW YORK CITY.

37
Immigrants from Mexico
38
MEXICAN IMMIGRANTS
  • TREATY OF GUADALUPE HIDALGO (1848)
  • United States acquired Mexican Cession from the
    Republic of Mexico for 15 million dollars
  • All Mexicans living in the Mexican Cession were
    granted United States citizenship.

39
Mexican Immigration
  • Newlands Act, aka The National Reclamation Act of
    1902.
  • Provided advance irrigation to agricultural areas
    of the Desert Southwest of the United States.
  • Thousands of Mexicans immigrate to work on farms
    in the American Southwest.

40
Mexican Immigration
  • The Mexican Revolution.
  • Thousands left Mexico to escape political,
    economic and social turmoil.
  • 7 of entire Mexican population immigrates to
    United States.

41
The Journey to the New World
42
(No Transcript)
43
The New Colossus Emma Lazarus
  • Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
  • With conquering limbs astride from land to land
  • Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
  • A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
  • Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
  • Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand
  • Glows world-wide welcome her mild eyes command
  • The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.
  • "Keep ancient lands, your storied pomp!" cries
    she
  • With silent lips. "Give me your tired, your poor,
  • Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
  • The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
  • Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
  • I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"

44
Ellis Island
This became the primary entry point for millions
of Europeans who immigrated to the United States.

45
Immigrant Inspection
46
G H E T T O S
Most immigrants settled in communities settled by
fellow immigrants from their homelands. Many
would settle in the cities of their ports of
entry.
47
(No Transcript)
48
The Challenge of Cities
Between 1880 1920, 11 millions left the
economic hardships of the farms for the
opportunities that cities offered.
49
The Suburbs
Residential communities surrounding the cities.
Motorized transportation made living outside of
cities and commuting to work in cities possible.
50
Chicago 1871
51
Chicago 1916
52
Skyscrapers Cities grow upwards as well as
outwards
The elevator, invented by Elisha Graves Otis in
1852, made skyscrapers possible. The Chicago
Home Insurance Company building (1885) and the
Wainwright building (1891) in St. Louis were two
of the first skyscrapers built.
53
Living in the Cities
54
How the Other Half Lives
55
Jacob Riis Danish immigrant, photojournalist,
writer, reformer, PROGRESSIVE
56
(No Transcript)
57
(No Transcript)
58
(No Transcript)
59
(No Transcript)
60
(No Transcript)
61
(No Transcript)
62
(No Transcript)
63
(No Transcript)
64
N A T I V I S M
Favoring native-born Americans over immigrants.
65
The American Protective Association
  • Targeted immigrants as unwanted.
  • Called for teaching of English language only in
    schools.
  • Wanted tougher conditions for citizenship.
  • Wanted stricter laws on employing immigrants
  • Particularly despised Catholics.

66
IMMIGRATION RESTRICTION LEAGUE
  • Formed by Harvard graduates in 1894
  • Wanted a literacy test used to exclude immigrants
    considered unfit.
  • Particularly disliked immigrants from Southern
    and Eastern Europe (the New Immigrants)

67
Looking Backward
P U C K
68
City Politics Corruption
69
The Political B O S S
  • Individual who organizes, manages, leads and
    dominates a political party in given area (city,
    county, state, or national level).

70
Boss Tweed
  • Held numerous jobs including being a chairmaker,
    a bookkeeper, a member of father's brush-man
    firm, and a volunteer fireman.
  • Became an alderman to New York city in 1851 and
    rose quickly through the ranks
  • Major Accomplishments
  • Built his power in Tammany Hall through the
    appointment and election of his friends (called
    the 'Tweed Ring')
  • Conned and plundered the city of New York out of
    between 30-200 million dollars
  • Significance
  • Controlled all Democratic New York state and city
    nominations from 1860-1870
  • Used illegal means to force election of his
    choice for New York governor, New York City
    mayor, and speaker of the assembly
  • Raised public indignation against graft and was
    convicted and sentenced to prison (Note He was
    also sued by the city of New York in a civil
    suit. He escaped from jail and fled to Spain. He
    was identified there from a cartoon drawn by
    Thomas Nast. He was returned to New York and died
    in jail there.)

71
Tammany Hall
  • Tammany Hall was the name given to the
    Democratic political machine that dominated New
    York City politics

72
Immigration Boss politics
73
Immigrants AND Political Machines Boss
politics
THATS WHATS THE MATTER Boss Tweed, As long
as I count the Votes, what are you going to do
about it? Say?
JOBS, PLACES TO LIVE, OTHER ASSISTANCE
74
VOTE EARLY AND VOTE OFTEN
75
Corruption in Municipal Elections
76
(No Transcript)
77
Arrest of the Boss
78
Social Reform
  • Helping the Needy

79
Charity Organization Movement
  • Made charity a scientific enterprise
  • Kept detailed files of those poor that were
    worthy of helping
  • Wanted immigrants to adopt American middle-class
    standards of child-rearing, cleaning and cooking.

80
Social Gospel Movement
  • Sought to apply the teachings of Jesus Christ to
    directly help improve society.
  • Focused on ideals such as justice charity, and
    sought labor reforms
  • Wanted improved living and working conditions for
    workers, including larger share of national
    wealth for workers.

81
The Settlement Movement
  • Settlement House kind of community center,
    offered social services
  • Hull House opened by Jane Addams Ellen Gates
    Starr
  • Offered education, culture, and hope to slums

82
Hull House
83
Temperance Prohibition
  • Temperance Movement was an organized campaign to
    eliminate alcohol consumption.
  • Prohibition Party
  • Womens Christian Temperance Movement
  • Anti-Saloon League

84
P R O H I B I T I O N
Carrie A. Nation crusaded against the evils of
alcohol with a hatchet and the Bible
A ban on the manufacturing and sale of alcoholic
beverages!
85
P U R I T Y C R U S A D E R S
  • Those that lead the fight against immoral or
    corrupt behavior, VICE.
  • Drugs, gambling, prostitution and other forms of
    corrupt decadent behavior
  • Began attacking political machines for corruption
    in city politics.

Anthony Comstock founded the New York Society of
the Suppression of Vice.
86
The Comstock Law
  • Prohibited sending obscene materials through the
    mail (this included any material that included
    descriptions of birth control).

87
(No Transcript)
About PowerShow.com