Effective Teaching Strategies Exploring Similarities and Differences - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Effective Teaching Strategies Exploring Similarities and Differences PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 57bcba-MGE4O



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Effective Teaching Strategies Exploring Similarities and Differences

Description:

Effective Teaching Strategies Exploring Similarities and Differences Windham Middle School December 3, 2008 Jane Cook EASTCONN Staff Development Specialist – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:110
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 53
Provided by: east48
Learn more at: http://ctteams.wikispaces.com
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Effective Teaching Strategies Exploring Similarities and Differences


1
Effective Teaching Strategies Exploring
Similarities and Differences
  • Windham Middle School
  • December 3, 2008
  • Jane Cook
  • EASTCONN Staff Development Specialist
  • Windham Middle School Literacy Technology Coach
  • janecook_at_earthlink.net
  • Parts of the presentation are adapted from a
    PowerPoint presentation by Scott King-Owen
    http//www.nhcs.k12.nc.us/instruction/ssflpe/CITWh
    andouts/Teaching20Similarities20and20Difference
    s.ppt and a PowerPoint presentation by Rebecca
    Pilver, EASTCONN Staff Development Specialist

2
Warm Up What do we have in common?
  • With a partner, you have 2 minutes to find 4
    things that you have in common - the 4 things
    have to be hidden (not obvious). Write them down.
  • Now, get with another partner. Find 4 things that
    you have in common. Again the 4 things must be
    hidden (not obvious). Write them down.
  • Now, join into a group of 4 and compare the
    commonalities and find things that are unique
    about each of you. Find 2 things that each of you
    have that is unique to only you.
  • What did you learn? How could you use this
    activity with your students? What purpose would
    it serve?

3
Objectives
  • To understand how Effective Teaching Strategies
    connect to Data Teams and the DDDM process
  • To explore the Effective Teaching Strategy (ETS)
    known as Similarities and Differences
  • To practice using the Similarities and
    Differences strategy and plan ways to apply this
    ETS in your teaching

4
Review of Effective Teaching Strategies
Marzano, et al, 2001
  • Similarities and Differences
  • Summarizing and Note Taking
  • Effort and Recognition
  • Homework and Practice
  • Nonlinguistic Representation
  • Cooperative Learning
  • Setting Objectives Providing Feedback
  • Generating Testing Hypotheses
  • Cues, Questions and Advance Organizers

5
Why Are These Effective Strategies?
Category Achievement Gain (Percentiles)
1. Identifying Similarities and Differences 45
2. Summarizing and Note Taking 34
3. Reinforcing Effort and Providing Recognition 29
4. Homework and Practice 28
5. Nonlinguistic Representations 27
6. Cooperative Learning 27
7. Setting Objectives and Providing Feedback 23
8. Generating and Testing Hypothesis 23
9. Questions, Cues and Advance Organizers 22
10. Non-fiction Writing NOTE This strategy
was identified after Marzanos book was published
Indicates district-wide focus 2008-09
Classroom Instruction that Works Robert Marzano,
Debra Pickering, Jane Pollock
5
6
How do we use ETS in Data Driven Decision Making?
  • Lets try an example
  • Team collected and charted data They found
    through their pretest data that students are
    scoring far below their peers on problem solving.
  • Team wrote a SMART Goal Currently 50 of our
    grade 5 students are scoring below proficient on
    math word problem solving as measured by the
    pretest. By the end of the 3-week instructional
    unit, 75 will score proficient or higher on math
    word problem solving as measured by the post test.

7
Data Team Thinking
Analyze Why? and Select Instructional Strategies Analyze Why? and Select Instructional Strategies
Why is this? What can we try? (ETS)
Students know how they are not fluent or automatic Homework and Practice Problem a Day in class for guided practice/ Homework targeted to provide independent practice
Students dont know the process Nonlinguistic Representation Similarities and Differences Problem solving chart/Comparison matrix
Problems are various Providing Feedback Looking at Student Work
They dont know the vocabulary Vocabulary Instruction Variety of ETS strategies, e.g., Nonlinguistic Representations, Similarities and Differences, etc.
8
Similarities and Differences
  • Read the description of Similarities and
    Differences.
  • Turn to a partner and briefly discuss why
    similarities and differences are considered the
    core of all learning.

9
Similarities and Differences
  • Lets play the Similarities and Differences
    online evolution game at http//evolution.berkel
    ey.edu/evolibrary/article/0_0_0/similarity_hs_01
  • With a partner, discuss how such an activity
    might support a students learning.

10
4 Types of Similarities and Differences
  • Comparing
  • Classifying
  • Creating Metaphors
  • Creating Analogies

11
4 Door Shutter Fold Foldable
  • Fold a piece of paper in half widthwise (like a
    hamburger).
  • Open it up and fold each half in half so they
    meet in the center You now have a 2 Door
    Shutter Foldable
  • Fold the 2 Door Shutter in half widthwise (like a
    hamburger).
  • Open it back up and cut or tear the shutters on
    the fold line so you have 4 doors instead of 2.
  • Write Comparing, Classifying, Metaphors and
    Analogies on the four shutters (tabs).
  • Use this 4 Door Shutter Fold Foldable to take
    notes today.

12
Comparing
  • Turn to your neighbor/s and compare a table to
    a chair.
  • What steps did you go through in order to
    compare?
  • What did comparing require of you?

13
Comparing Steps in the Process
  • Select the items
  • Describe the items (visually or linguistically)
  • Select the characteristic(s) of the items that
    are most important for comparison
  • Explain how the items are similar and different
    according to the selected characteristic(s)
  • OR PUT ANOTHER WAY

14
Graphic Organizers for Comparing
  • Comparison Matrix
  • Venn Diagram
  • Double Bubble
  • Others?

15
A Comparison Matrix is
  • A table that is used to describe items (things,
    people, places, events, ideas, etc.) and to
    compare their characteristics
  • An effective analytic tool to simplify the
    process of analysis.
  • An organized way of thinking that allows users to
    compare multiple characteristics of two or more
    items
  • If students haven't worked with a Comparison
    Matrix before, the structure of the matrix should
    be as unsophisticated as possible.
  • As students become more knowledgeable, you can
    add more characteristics for a deeper comparison.

16
A Simple Comparison Matrix
How are they alike? How are they different?
Directions Place a 'X' in the box to indicate if
an item possesses that characteristic.
17
A Complex Comparison Matrix
Characteristics Item 1 Item 2
Similarities
Differences
Similarities
Differences
Similarities
Differences
Similarities
Differences
Heres an example of a completed matrix
http//www.americanchemistry.com/s_plastics/hands_
on_plastics2/activities/abrasion_results.asp
18
Real World Applications of a Comparison Matrix
Low Cost Laptop Cheat Sheet Low Cost Laptop Cheat Sheet Low Cost Laptop Cheat Sheet Low Cost Laptop Cheat Sheet Low Cost Laptop Cheat Sheet Low Cost Laptop Cheat Sheet
Laptop Name Price Processor Storage Display Size /Resolution Webcam
Asus EeePC 2G Surf (700) 299 800 MHz Intel Celeron-M ULV 353 2GB SSD 7 inches/ 800 x 480 No
Asus EeePC 4G Surf (701) 349.99 900 MHz Intel Celeron-M ULV 353 4GB SSD 7 inches/ 800 x 480 No
Asus EeePC 4G 399.99 900 MHz Intel Celeron-M ULV 353 4GB SSD 7 inches/ 800 x 480 0.3 mega pixels
Asus EeePC 8G 499.99 900 MHz Intel Celeron-M ULV 353 8GB SSD 7 inches/ 800 x 480 0.3 mega pixels
Source http//blog.laptopmag.com/low-cost-laptop-cheat-sheet Source http//blog.laptopmag.com/low-cost-laptop-cheat-sheet Source http//blog.laptopmag.com/low-cost-laptop-cheat-sheet Source http//blog.laptopmag.com/low-cost-laptop-cheat-sheet Source http//blog.laptopmag.com/low-cost-laptop-cheat-sheet Source http//blog.laptopmag.com/low-cost-laptop-cheat-sheet
What real world applications can you think of for
a Comparison Matrix? Turn to a partner and
discuss this.
Any ideas?
How about this?
19
Venn Diagram
A Venn Diagram is a graphic organizer that uses
circles to represent sets (or items), with the
position and overlap of the circles indicating
the relationships between the sets (or items). It
was named after John Venn (18341923), British
logician. Venn Diagrams show how items relate to
each other. Most of the "action" is in the
overlapping areas. Source http//www.answers.co
m/topic/venn-diagram
20
How to make a Three-Tab Venn Diagram Book
Foldable 1. Fold a piece of (8 ½ x 11) paper
in half vertically (like a hotdog). If using
notebook paper, fold only to the margin. 2. With
the paper horizontal and the fold of the hotdog
up, fold the right side toward the center, trying
to cover one half of the paper. (Make a mark
here, but do not crease the paper.) Or, to
reinforce math skills, have the students
determine what the measurements would be for
dividing the page into 3 equal parts using a
ruler. 3. Fold the left side over the right side
to make a book with three folds. 4. Open the
folded book. Place your hands between the two
thicknesses of paper and cut up or tear the two
valleys on one side only. This will form three
tabs. 5. Draw overlapping circles on the three
tabs to make a Venn Diagram.
A GetReal! Project http//getreal.wikispaces.com/
Foldables are 3D Graphic Organizers created
by Dinah Zike. www.dinah.com
21
Double Bubble
A Double Bubble is a kind of thinking map/graphic
organizer that can be used to compare
similarities and differences. It has multiple
bubbles that connect two items with their
similarities and differences.
To download this graphic organizer, go to
http//freeteach.com/graphic_organizers/double_bub
ble
22
Double Bubble Template
  • To use the Double Bubble Template
  • Fill in the 2 large circles with the items you
    are comparing and contrasting.
  • In the shaded bubbles, write in the
    characteristics that the 2 items have in common.
  • Use the other circles to list characteristics
    that are unique to each item.

Source http//www.cwhp.info/curriculum/sources2/
graphic_organizers.pdf
23
Create a Double Bubble
24
Sample Completed Double Bubble
25
Comparing
Students may benefit from brainstorming about the
topics to be compared by using a Circle Map.
This allows them to focus on one object of
comparison at a time.
26
Comparing Teaching Tips
  • Students can expand their creative thinking if
    you ask them to compare two objects which seem
    very dissimilar.(How is the President similar to
    and different from
  • a restaurant chef?)
  • How you use it depends on your purpose. For
    example, if you wish for students to focus on
    specific similarities and differences, the
    activity will be more teacher-directed. If you
    wish to stimulate divergent thinking, the
    activity would be more student-directed.

27
Other Ideas?
  • In small groups or with a partner, talk about
    what you will be teaching in the next few weeks
    and discuss
  • How can you use comparing in your classroom to
    teach the concepts that you want your students to
    learn?
  • Jot down some ideas on your 4 Door Foldable.

28
Classification
  • Classifying refers to sorting objects into
    categories based on shared characteristics.
  • Classifying depends on identifying the
    similarities and differences between the objects.
  • Share When have you used classifying as an
    instructional strategy?

29
Classification Activity
  • Sort the words on the next slide into categories.
  • Discuss What steps did you take to sort the
    words? What did classifying require of you?

30
tuna shark eagle whale
ostrich bat dog alligator
salmon dolphin penguin flying squirrel
person sheep monkey robin
31
More Classifying Ideas
  • Ask students to classify objects in teacher
    directed groups and then ask them to form new
    groups and create new classifications.
  • Use classifying to preview, assess and tap into
    prior knowledge before a unit.
  • Use classifying for vocabulary development.

32
Why is classification effective?
  • Look at the following letters for 10 seconds
  • XIBMSATMTVPHDX

33
What do you remember?
  • How many letters did you remember?
  • All 14
  • Between 8 and 14
  • Less than 8
  • What strategy did you use to remember the letters?

34
Look at them again.
  • XIBMSATMTVPHDX

35
Now what do you remember?
  • How many letters did you remember this time?
  • All 14
  • Between 8 and 14
  • Less than 8
  • Why did you remember more the second time?
  • What strategy did you use to remember the letters?

36
Other Ideas?
  • In small groups or with a partner, talk about
    what you will be teaching in the next few weeks
    and discuss
  • How can you use classifying in your classroom to
    teach the concepts that you want your students to
    learn?
  • Jot down some ideas on your 4 Door Foldable.

37
What is a Metaphor?
  • Comparison involving similarity

A simile is a type of metaphor because it is a
comparison, but not all metaphors are similes.
38
A Rose is
  • Rose The blossom is beautiful and sweet to
    smell, but if you touch the thorns, they can
    stick you.
  • Something is beautiful but it can sometimes hurt!
    OUCH!
  • Love Love makes you feel wonderful, but you can
    get hurt.

Love is a rose.
39
Metaphors Choose one of the following and
create a metaphor.
  • The water cycle is
  • Writing a paragraph is.
  • Poetry is
  • Differentiating instruction is
  • Reading is.

40
Why are metaphors effective?
  • Think about when someone you were learning from
    used a metaphor in their teaching. Why was it
    effective?

41
Metaphor Teaching Tips
  • Use metaphors in your teaching to help connect to
    background knowledge.
  • Give students open-ended metaphors to encourage
    creative thinking.
  • Give students completed metaphors to explain and
    evaluate.

42
Other Ideas?
  • In small groups or with a partner, talk about
    what you will be teaching in the next few weeks
    and discuss
  • How can you use metaphors in your classroom to
    teach the concepts that you want your students to
    learn?
  • Jot down some ideas on your 4 Door Foldable.

43
Analogy
  • An Analogy is a comparison between related pairs.
  • A is to B as C is to D

C
A
D
B
Brace Map
44
A Sample Miller Analogy Test Item
  • PLANE AIR CAR
  • (a. motorcycle, b. engine, c. land, d.
    atmosphere)
  • Or put another way


45
Who thinks the answer is
  • a. motorcycle
  • b. engine
  • c. land
  • d. atmosphere
  • Turn to a partner and explain why you chose the
    letter that you did.

46
The Answer
  • In this type of analogy, one term causes,
    creates, provides, requires, uses, or in some
    other way relies on the other term.
  • For this particular item, one term in each pair
    of terms travels on the other. A plane travels
    on air, just as a car travels on land.

Source http//pearsonassess.com/NR/rdonlyres/1A2
076F6-2608-421F-8ECA-EA884EBB9288/0/NAGAPPresentat
ion2008.pdf
47
Create an Analogy
  • I Have a Dream was to the Civil Rights Movement
    as
  • _____________ to _________________.
  • (historical event (movement)
  • or document)

In small groups, complete the analogy using
another historical event or document in the first
blank and a movement in the second blank.
48
Analogy Teaching Tips
  • During Instructional Delivery
  • -Use an analogous situation to explain difficult
    concepts using more familiar terms. This helps
    students connect the known to the unknown.
  • Ask students to generate analogies
  • -Give them a partial analogy and ask them to
    generate another pair
  • -Ask them to come up with the analogy on their
    own
  • -Put word pairs into an envelope and ask students
    to randomly construct analogies
  • -Ask students to defend their reasoning orally
    and in writing

49
Other Ideas?
  • In small groups or with a partner, talk about
    what you will be teaching in the next few weeks
    and discuss
  • How can you use metaphors in your classroom to
    teach the concepts that you want your students to
    learn?
  • Jot down some ideas on your 4 Door Foldable.

50
EDUCATION HUMOR WORST ANALOGIES USED IN ESSAYS
  • The following are from the winners of the "worst
    analogies ever written in a high school essay"
    contest from http//www.adprima.com/humor.htm
  • Mary was as interested in Joey as she was in a
    two-day old tuna sandwich left on the kitchen
    table, hidden by a dishcloth. This perplexed
    Joey.
  • Her hair glistened in the rain like nose hair
    after a sneeze.
  • Long separated by cruel fate, the star-crossed
    lovers raced across the grassy field toward each
    other like two freight trains, one having left
    Cleveland at 636 p.m. traveling at 55 mph, the
    other from Topeka at 419 p.m. at a speed of 35
    mph.

51
Next Steps Application to Data Teams
  • At future meetings, brainstorm more ideas for
    using comparing, classifying, analogies, and
    metaphors across the curriculum.
  • Discuss with your Data Team members how
    Similarities and Differences could be applied in
    your classrooms.
  • Plan at least one lesson that incorporates
    Similarities and Differences with your students.

52
For Next Time
Bring a sample of some student work which used
one of the types of Similarities and
Differences. Thank You!
About PowerShow.com