Application of management and systems engineering to student projects - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Application of management and systems engineering to student projects PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 57af29-ZmQ3M



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Application of management and systems engineering to student projects

Description:

Title: Application of management and systems engineering to student projects Author: J-M Wersinger User Last modified by: David H. Atkinson Created Date – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:69
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 46
Provided by: JMWersin
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Application of management and systems engineering to student projects


1
Application of management and systems engineering
to student projects
  • The example of the Auburn University Student
    Space Program

2
Outline
  1. What is the Auburn University Student Space
    Program (AUSSP)?
  2. Lessons learned after 5 years
  3. Corrective steps taken and preliminary results

3
What is AUSSP?
  • Member of the National Space Grant Student
    Satellite Program
  • Involves about 35 undergraduate students any time
    in three-five teams
  • Auburn High-Altitude Balloonning (AHAB) team
  • AubieSat-I (CubeSat) team
  • AubieSat-II (NanoSat) team
  • Mars team
  • Management team

4
National Space Grant Student Satellite Program
Crawl Walk Run Fly From model rockets to
Mars http//ssp.arizona.edu/sgsatellites
5
CRAWL
BalloonSat Programs
CanSat Programs
6
WALK
Sounding Rocket Programs
CubeSat Programs
7
RUN
Nanosat Programs
Arizona State University ASUSat 1
Colorado Space Grants Citizen Explorer 1
Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico Three-Corner
Sat
8
FLY
To the Moon and Mars
External support opportunities to get involved
9
Some Suggested activities
Science analysisSoftware tools for data storage,
handling, accessProject ManagementSystems
EngineeringMission OperationsSpacecraft
subsystemsDesign, build, test, calibration,
operations, performance maintenanceCommunications
, PowerStructures, Mechanisms, Thermal Science,
InstrumentsAttitude, orbitAerial mobility
(Flyers), Surface Mobility (Rovers)Prototyping/de
veloping applicable technologiesPublic
InformationK-12 programs (ed. Modules, teacher
training, etc.)
10
Why Student Projects?
  • Aging Workforce
  • Inspire Retain
  • Pipeline issue
  • Attract and keep best students in STEM
  • Active learning
  • Job training learning process

11
The AHAB Program
  • Crawl level
  • Freshmen and Sophomores
  • Class Physics of the World Around Us (3
    Credits)
  • Launch payloads to the edge of space (altitude
    range 80,000 - 100,000 feet)
  • Max weight 16 lbs

12
The AHAB Program
  • GOALS
  • Reliable launcher
  • Importance of control cut-down system
  • Shielding
  • Outreach program for K-12
  • Science experiments

13
(No Transcript)
14
(No Transcript)
15
Troubleshooting!
lt Mooring
16
(No Transcript)
17
AS-I CubeSat
  • Walk level
  • Juniors and Seniors
  • Class Physics of the World Around Us (3
    Credits)
  • Use COTS
  • Science mission being defined
  • Mass 1-kg Cube of 10-cm sides

18
AS-I CubeSat
  • GOALS
  • Students develop technical as well as systems
    engineering and management skills designing,
    building, testing and operating a CubeSat
  • Put first AU satellite in LEO
  • AS-I performs successfully in space
  • Develop a steady student satellite capability at
    AU

19
(No Transcript)
20
AS-II NanoSat
  • Run level
  • Exceptional Juniors and Seniors
  • Potential students are working on AS-I
  • Mass 50-kg Max linear dimension 45-cm
  • Submit proposal to AFOSR deadline for
    submission 15 October
  • Radiation mitigation experiment

21
Mars Student Activities
  • Fly level
  • Magnetic Investigation of Mars by Interacting
    Consortia (MIMIC)
  • Work with JPL and 10 SG Consortia
  • AUSSP in charge of science and instruments for
    the mission
  • Measuring the remnant magnetic field of Mars gt
    loss of atmosphere gt loss of liquid surface
    water gt impact on potential life
  • Mission abandoned NASA launcher scrapped
  • AU six participating students, two spent Summer
    04 at JPL

22
Mars Student Activities
  • AU students _at_ JPL during summer
  • Luther Richardson - 2003
  • Ben Spratling and Eric Massey - 2004
  • Jason Stewart - 2005
  • Eric Grimes - 2006
  • INSPIRATION in 2006 a robotic weather station on
    surface of Mars (11 SG students 2 from Alabama)
  • Eric Grimes in charge of instruments

23
Management Team
  • Students from non-technical majors finance,
    business, accounting, nutrition, journalism,
    history, etc.
  • No class credit in physics
  • Student Program Manager
  • Positions CFO, HRO, PRO, ITO
  • Meetings twice a week
  • Support program and tech teams

24
Management Team
  • Program support
  • Budget, purchasing, accounting
  • Fund raising visibility on campus and beyond
  • Recruitment
  • Contact information
  • Class rolls/participation
  • Wiki and website
  • Certificates and awards
  • Longitudinal tracking
  • Socials
  • SEDS

25
Program history
  • Program started in Fall 2001
  • Immediately started both a CubeSat and a
    Ballooning program
  • First balloon launch with recovery in Nov. 2001
  • Added a Mars mission in Fall 2003
  • Added a NanoSat project in 2006

26
Program evaluation - Pros
  • Over 100 students participated
  • Five students to JPL Summer Programs
  • One student at least with a NASA job
  • Two students presently co-oping with NASA
  • Six balloon launches
  • A CubeSat partially designed and the structure
    built
  • Tested CubeSat ejection from P-Pod in C-9
  • Four HS experiments ready for balloon flight
  • Learned from a large number of mistakes

27
Program evaluation - Cons
  • Only six balloon flights of which four were not
    found the day of launch
  • No final design yet of AS-I after five years
  • Non-productive AHAB teams in 2005 one year
    without a launch
  • Year wasted with insufficient students for AS-I
    in Fall 2005 and Spring 2006

28
Analysis
  • We could not make a purely student-led program
    work
  • Need to teach and implement process
  • Management
  • Systems Engineering
  • We were not successful in getting enough students
    to commit
  • Lack of support of engineering over years

29
Lessons learned - 1
  • Faculty mentor
  • Used to work through student team manager
  • Now directly involved in all activities
  • Sets the tone right from the beginning
  • Runs team activities as a laboratory
  • Is now seen as the captain of the boat
  • Student manager
  • Used to run the labs
  • Now helps mentor manage the lab meetings, learns
    management and takes on increasing
    responsibilities with time
  • Student systems engineer
  • Learns skills form mentor and experts in and
    outside labs

30
Lessons learned - 2
  • Process
  • Used to be pointed out on an as needed basis
  • Building fever kills process and produces
    failure
  • Process now taught to - and immediately applied
    by -the whole team in the first weeks of the
    semester
  • Recruitment
  • High turn-over rates
  • Learning curve
  • Need to recruit top students
  • Recruitment strategy that works

31
Lesson learned - 3
  • Student commitment
  • Strong mentor leadership gt students feel more
    secure
  • Responsibility matrix signed
  • Make sure students have a job they can do and
    like to do
  • Certificates
  • Summer jobs expanded
  • Participation in conferences
  • NASA and AE industry contacts for jobs

32
Lessons learned - 4
  • Student participation
  • Participate in project objectives, requirements
    and tasks definition take ownership of project
  • Each student has a responsibility matrix - no
    more watching the few gung-ho students work and
    getting disconnected
  • Documentation
  • No lab exit before activities are documented
  • Last week of semester is documentation week
  • Documentation is significant part of grade

33
Learning Management - 1
  • Each semesters work is defined as a project
  • Students are presented the status of the system
    they are to work on
  • The mentor has defined the vision, mission, a few
    broad goals, milestones and deliverables for the
    semester
  • The students having learned the basics of the
    system are ready to work out the objectives for
    each goal

34
Learning Management - 2
  • The students work out
  • The objectives for each goal
  • The systems operational requirements
  • The subsystems requirements
  • The tasks to be performed based on the objectives
    and requirements
  • The tasks are organized as a Work Breakdown
    Structure (WBS)

35
Learning Management - 3
  • The WBS includes duration of tasks
  • A network diagram reveals the order in which
    tasks are to be accomplished
  • The critical path is identified
  • A Gantt Chart represents the schedule
  • Students do an inventory of materials
  • Students make a list of needed tools and
    materials
  • Students are now ready to start building

36
Learning Management - 4
  • Each lab session starts with
  • A quick status of project
  • A look at the Gantt Chart
  • A comparison of the two is made and corrective
    action is defined
  • The goals of the session are set
  • Lab work proceeds design and/or building is
    done, tests are performed
  • Results are documented before leaving the lab

37
Important ingredients
  • Discipline
  • Flexibility
  • Reviews

38
Systems Engineering - 1
  • Plans and guides the engineering effort
  • Focuses on system as a whole
  • Bridges traditional engineering disciplines
  • Necessary due to specialization and complexity of
    modern systems

39
Systems Engineering - 2
  • Hierarchical elements of a system
  • Mission Architecture gt Balloon, Rigging,
    Tracking Box, Payload, Launch Team, Ground
    Station, Tracking Teams, Path Determination,
    Outreach
  • System gt Tracking Box
  • Subsystems gt Structure Rigging, Primary
    Tracking, Secondary Tracking, Power, Cut-Down
  • Components gt Transceivers, GPS, TNC, Cut-Down
    Board
  • Parts gt batteries, cables

40
System Life Cycle
Source Systems Engineering, Principles and
Practice, Alexander Kossiakoff and William N.
Sweet, Wiley-Interscience 2003
41
Systems Engineering Method over Life Cycle
Source Systems Engineering, Principles and
Practice, Alexander Kossiakoff and William N.
Sweet, Wiley-Interscience 2003
42
Results - 1
  • Started August 24
  • Extraordinary difference from past
  • Student participation
  • Eagerness to work
  • Confidence
  • Learning
  • Two students spent 7 hours doing inventory!

43
Results - 2
  • In three weeks, both Balloon and CubeSat have
  • Defined semester objectives
  • Worked out requirements mission, system,
    subsystem
  • Developed their WBS at work session level
  • Established a schedule
  • Established status of system
  • Done a full inventory
  • Started work on subsystems
  • Ordered components

44
(No Transcript)
45
Conclusions
  • Some requirements for a successful student
    program
  • Full faculty involvement with whole team
  • Full student participation in project and work
    definitions
  • Clearly defined process
  • Students learning and applying management and
    systems engineering principles, tools and
    techniques
  • Each student has responsibilities and work load
    well defined
  • Fast track tech skills development
  • Technical expertise provided
  • Develop camaraderie between team members
About PowerShow.com