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Writing a School or Departmental Safety Policy

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Title: Writing a School or Departmental Safety Policy


1
Writing a School or Departmental Safety Policy
  • Presented by Andrew Knight University Safety
    Adviser

2
(No Transcript)
3
From experience
  • Andrew Knight University Safety Adviser
  • Has written or assisted writing policies for
  • University of Brighton Estate and Facilities
    Management Department
  • Honourable Society of the Inner Temple
  • Ordnance Survey
  • North East Surrey College of Technology (NESCOT)
  • Bradford and Bingley Geering and Colyer
  • South African Airways
  • INMARSAT
  • Pets to the Vets
  • Air Mauritius
  • And many more..

4
Fire and Emergency
  • Alarm sounder
  • Assembly point

5
Other details
  • Toilets
  • Mobile phones
  • Questions
  • Confidentiality

6
Group
  • Introduce yourself to the person next to you.
    Discuss what experience you have in writing
    policies and what you hope to get out of today.

7
Course overview
  • The course aims are to
  • Examine the essential content of a school safety
    policy and the process by which the policy is
    formulated, agreed and issued.
  • Enable delegates to draft and implement an
    effective school safety policy
  • Make recommendations on how the policy will be
    updated and reviewed

8
Course objectives
  • Have knowledge of what information should be
    documented within a school safety policy
  • Be aware of factors that affect whether a policy
    is Effective
  • Examining why local policies are needed

9
Introduction
10
What is a School or Departmental Safety Policy?
  • It is a document structured in the same way as
    the University Safety Policy, but containing
    arrangements specific to the School.
  • It sets out specific responsibilities and makes
    staff accountable for health and safety

11
Why have a policy?
  • FLIP CHART
  • Why do you think it is necessary / important to
    have a policy?

12
Why have a policy?
  • Who, what, when, how!
  • Clear communication of health and safety
    responsibilities
  • Sensible to set out the local arrangements for
    managing health and safety
  • Policy writing is as much about the process, as
    the end result

13
Framework of the policy - HSG65
14
Why have a policy?
  • The Management of Health and Safety at Work
    Regulations 1992 introduced a legislative
    requirement for Planning, Monitoring,
    Implementing, Review
  • This was translated by UCEA into University
    sector guidance University Health and Safety
    Management Code of Practice

15
Why have a policy? 1 of 4
  • The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 requires
    that businesses employing 5 or more employees
    must have a written health and safety policy

16
Why have a policy 2 of 4
  • Section 2(3) of the HS at Work Act 1974 states
  • "It shall be the duty of every employer to
    prepare and as often as may be appropriate revise
    a written statement of his/her general policy
    with respect to the health and safety at work

17
Why have a policy? 3 of 4
  • The policy must state the general policy on
    health and safety.
  • Describe the organisation and arrangements for
    carrying out the policy
  • Be brought to the notice of all employees

18
Why have a policy? 4 of 4
  • Be revised whenever appropriate, and every
    revision must be brought to the attention of all
    employees.
  • It is a legal requirement under the Act, and has
    to be complied with.

19
Business Benefits
20
Business benefits
  • It is important to identify the benefits and
    reasons for a School Policy. This can be useful
    for building a business case or influencing
    members of staff who may need to contribute

21
Business benefits
  • Why bother? We have a University Safety Policy?
    Do we REALLY need another policy?
  • Positive and negative
  • FLIP CHART

22
Business benefits
  • Enhanced reputation
  • Specific hazards from School activities
  • Specific organisational arrangements
  • Individual responsibilities e.g. Radiation or
    Biological Safety Officer
  • University Safety Policy does not contain detail
    on local arrangements
  • Induction of new staff

23
Business benefits
  • Reduce accidents and ill health
  • Reduce number of civil claims
  • May provide defence in civil proceedings
  • Boost staff morale
  • Demonstrates management commitment
  • Ensures consistency in approach to health and
    safety
  • Saves time from duplication of effort
  • Improves communication

24
BREAK
25
Links with the University Health and Safety Policy
  • The University Safety Policy requires that Heads
    of School document a School Safety Policy
  • A School policy is sub-ordinate to the University
    Safety Policy

26
Planning
27
Getting started
  • Commitment from HOS/HOD Crucial!!!
  • Identify resources
  • Sufficient time
  • Good knowledge of staff roles and
    responsibilities
  • Good understanding of the working practices
    within the school
  • Able to use a word processor
  • Able to communicate with all staff
  • Gather together existing policies and procedures

28
Formulation process
  • Who will you need to involve? E.g. Trade Union
    Consultation
  • Consider whether the policy will need to
    consolidate and rationalise a previous piecemeal
    approach to safety policy documentation?
  • May need a series of meetings with Senior
    Managers

29
EFM Case Study
Policy launch
Policy sent to HOD, approved and signed
Amendments to policy made
2nd draft produced for discussion at SMT
Review
Draft text prepared for comment by teams and
Trade Union Representatives
A series of meetings with Senior Managers arranged
Meetings with Health and Safety Department, Trade
Union Safety Representatives
Informal information gathering from discussion
with site based teams and site inspections.
Meeting with Senior Management Group to propose
Health and Safety programme. Policy need agreed,
timescale set.
30
Writing the Policy
31
Competence / Training
Procedures
Environment
Health and Safety Policy
Activities
Equipment
32
Achieving its aim
  • The policy should be specific to your business,
    and should be clear about arrangements and
    organisation for health and safety at work.
  • It should influence all your activities,
    including the selection of people, equipment and
    materials, the way work is done and how you
    design goods and services.

33
Policy structure
  • We are now going to examine each of the essential
    policy sections
  • Statement of Intent
  • Responsibilities
  • Organisation
  • Arrangements
  • Monitoring and review

34
Step 1 Statement of Intent
35
Statement of Intent
  • Commitment to health and safety
  • Show case
  • Aspirational, but should be realistic and
    achievable

36
Statement of intent 1 of 7
  • The statement should outline in broad terms the
    Schools overall philosophy in relation to the
    management of health and safety

37
Statement of Intent 2 of 7
  • Commit to operating the business in accordance
    with the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and
    all applicable regulations made under the Act,
    'so far as reasonably practicable'

38
Statement of Intent 3 of 7
  • Specify that health and safety are management
    responsibilities ranking equally with
    responsibilities for delivery of services

39
Statement of Intent 4 of 7
  • Indicate that it is the duty of management to see
    that everything reasonably practicable is done to
    prevent personal injury in the processes of
    production, and in the design, construction, and
    operation of all plant, machinery and equipment

40
Statement of Intent 5 of 7
  • Indicate that it is the duty of all employees to
    act responsibly, and to do everything they can to
    prevent injury to themselves and fellow workers.

41
Statement of Intent 6 of 7
  • Identify the main person with prime
    responsibility for health and safety (e.g. Head
    of School)

42
Statement of Intent 7 of 7
  • Be dated so as to ensure that it is periodically
    revised in the light of current conditions
  • be signed by the Head of School

43
Practical exercise
  • Handout

44
Step 2 Responsibilities
45
Responsibilities
  • Roles and responsibilities should set out clearly
    who is responsible for what.
  • Key individual responsibilities e.g. Assessors
    should be identified.
  • It is normal practice for the health and safety
    reporting and delegation lines to mirror the
    lines for the School.

46
(No Transcript)
47
Step 3 Organisation
48
Organisation (people and their duties)
  • The organisation section sets out the system of
    reporting lines and delegation for health and
    safety within the School
  • Committees and planning groups will need to be
    identified

49
Organisation (people and their duties)
  • Individual job descriptions having a safety
    content
  • Details of specific safety responsibilities
  • The role and function of safety committee (s)
  • The role and function of safety representatives
  • A management chart clearly showing the lines of
    responsibility and accountability in terms of
    health and safety management.

50
Documenting Change
  • Presented by Alan Cowen

51
Lunch
52
A cool reception!
  • An accident has recently occurred in a University
    laboratory, at the University of Hardknocks
  • A student was badly burned by contact with Liquid
    Nitrogen whilst extracting samples from a Dewar.
    The accident was reportable to Health and Safety
    Executive.
  • Principal Lecturer Andrew Knight is responsible
    for the course involving the use of Liquid
    Nitrogen.
  • HSE Inspector Alan Cowen is tasked with
    investigating the accident and meets with Andrew
    Knight.

53
Step 4 Arrangements
54
Arrangements
  • Generic e.g. Accidents, First Aid, Access,
    Accident Investigation
  • Specific COSHH, Manual handling, Portable
    Appliance Testing
  • Sensitive arrangements e.g. Security, Animals,
    Toxins, Explosives, Radiation, Money.

55
Essential arrangements 1 of 2
  • Managing risk assessments
  • Arrangements for consultation with employees
  • Arrangements for maintaining plant and equipment
  • Arrangements for safe handling and use of
    substances

56
Essential arrangements 2 of 2
  • Arrangements for providing information,
    instruction and supervision
  • Arrangements for training
  • Arrangements for accidents, first aid and ill
    health issues
  • Arrangements for monitoring (e.g. frequency of
    inspections)
  • Emergency procedures (e.g. Fire Wardens)

57
Arrangements (systems and procedures)
  • Other arrangements may include
  • Safety training
  • Safe systems of work
  • Environmental control
  • Safe place of work
  • Machine/area guarding
  • Housekeeping
  • Safe plant and equipment

58
Arrangements (systems and procedures)
  • Noise
  • Radiation safety
  • Use of toxic materials
  • Communication and consultation
  • Medical facilities and welfare
  • Maintenance of records
  • Expectant and nursing mothers
  • Young persons

59
Arrangements - performance standards
  • Arrangements section can contain references to
    the associated University Codes of Practice / BS
    / HSE guidance or legislation for further advice
    and guidance.
  • It is not necessary to duplicate a university
    Code of Practice if it accords with the School
    approach.

60
Arrangements Example WAHR
  • Register of equipment
  • Planning and organising
  • Hierarchy of control for WAH
  • Inspection and tagging
  • Competence standards and training need
  • Monitoring of works
  • Weather restrictions

61
Arrangements Example COSHH
  • COSHH requires statutory testing of LEV
  • Personal protective equipment requirements (could
    link to University CoP)
  • Health surveillance
  • Hazardous waste disposal
  • Specialists e.g. Biological Safety Officer

62
Practical exercise
  • HANDOUT
  • Arrangements sections

63
Step 5 Monitoring and Review
64
Monitoring and review
  • Frequency for review will depend upon activities
  • minimum every 2 years
  • Auditing of the policy should be undertaken to
    determine if the arrangements are being adhered
    to
  • Inspections
  • Staff SDR
  • Accident investigations, trends

65
Health and Safety Executive Model Policy
  • HANDOUT

66
BREAK
67
Implementation
68
Challenge generic content
  • Dont fall into the trap of copying a policy from
    a Google search
  • When writing or revising a policy challenge each
    section. There have been instances where
    Fairground Rides have been found in a School
    policy!

69
What is an Effective policy?
  • The policy needs to be implemented!

70
What is an Effective' policy?
  • Applicable / specific
  • Contains 4 key headings
  • Accurate details
  • User friendly well laid out, easy to navigate
  • Clear and unambiguous
  • Concise no padding
  • Up-to-date
  • Accessible website, bulletin
  • Easily to update

71
The good, the bad and the ugly!
  • Practical Exercise - Working in pairs critically
    analyse these real life policies. Decide whether
    the policy is well written and likely to be
    effective? Does it have all the sections?

72
Layout, style and document control
  • Page number e.g. Page 1 of 1
  • Document control showing revision and version
    history
  • Clear, easy to read font and font size

73
Living document or dead in the water?
  • Continuously updated to reflect changes in
    legislation, used daily, different people, new
    staff and frequencies

74
Policy approval
  • Who will need to approve the policy? Most
    instances this will be the Head of School and
    Senior Management Team
  • Consider specialists committees or forums? E.g.
    Biological Safety Committee

75
Communicating the policy
  • The policy should be communicated to all staff
    and possibly contractors
  • Question - Why would you need to communicate the
    policy to contractors?

76
Communicating the policy
  • The statutory health and safety law poster
    requires that health and safety information is
    communicated. A written policy achieves this.

77
Policy distribution 1 of 2
  • An introductory letter, signed by the Head of
    School should be appended to the policy
    explaining the reasons for the policy and what
    staff need to do
  • Issue electronically via e-mail to individual
    staff, or use paper copies for workers without PC
    access e.g. Cleaners

78
Policy distribution 2 of 2
  • Issue a summary copy or signpost in the form of a
    leaflet
  • Give a copy to all new employees as an integrated
    part of the induction programme
  • Affix the policy statement to notice boards
  • Ensure that any superseded policies are destroyed

79
Sustainability
  • Health and safety poster campaign
  • Tool box talks
  • Web pages
  • Notice boards
  • Policy launch photo opportunities

80
Making it happen
  • Agree a target date for completion
  • Send a draft to the University Safety Advisor
  • Block out time in your calendar to write the
    policy

81
Implementation
  • Has the policy been signed and dated?

82
Common problems
  • Unable to locate policy
  • Policy too generic / none specific
  • Policy not issued to all staff
  • Use of jargon or acronyms
  • Insufficient detail
  • Out of date - in a format that is difficult to
    revise
  • Missing essential sections (e.g. Organisation)

83
Proof reading
  • Ask a colleague to read the policy
  • Check spelling, punctuation and grammar
  • Does the policy flow well
  • Is the font size suitable
  • Are colours reproducible

84
Model Policy
  • HANDOUT This is a model policy that can be used
    as a basis for your own policy.

85
Action Planning
  • HANDOUT

86
Key messages
  • Every health and safety policy must be a unique
    document
  • Framework
  • Process look beyond the document
  • Manager buy-in
  • Sustaining
  • Help and support

87
(No Transcript)
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