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Drugs in School

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Title: Drugs in School Don t Go There Pharmaceuticals and Others Author: KHS Last modified by: chad Created Date: 2/4/2003 8:11:52 PM Document presentation format – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Drugs in School


1
Your Text Here
2
Are Substances a Problem for our Students?
  • National admitted use, 2010, grades 9-12
  • Inhalants 11.4
  • Prescription drugs without 20.7
  • a prescription
  • Cocaine/Crack 6.8
  • Tobacco 30.5
  • Marijuana 39.9
  • Alcohol 70.8
  • CDC, Surveillance Surveys, Youth Risk Behavior
    Surveillance (YRBBS), 2011

3
  • Texas substance abuse, grades 7-12
  • Inhalants 17.2
  • Illicit Drugs 27.9
  • Cocaine/Crack 5.4
  • Marijuana 26.2
  • Alcohol 61.8
  • Tobacco 30.5
  • Texas School Survey of Substance Use, 2010

4
  • First use by students in grades 7-12
  • 42.1 Tobacco before age 13
  • 50.5 Alcohol before age 13
  • 27.5 Marijuana before age 13
  • Texas School Survey of Substance Use, 2008

5
  • IT IS NEVER TOO LATE TO INTERVENE
  • Always express an interest.
  • Children often imitate behaviors.
  • Education and communication are the keys.
  • Be alert to change.
  • Monitor what children are doing.
  • Dont assume it cant happen.
  • Set aside time for family.
  • Family Circle, The Agony What Every Parent Must
    Know. April, 2002.

6
Do you know what illegal substances your children
have access to in their daily lives?

7
Types of Illegal Substances
  • Controlled Substances
  • Dangerous Drugs
  • Alcohol
  • Inhalants

8
Prescription Drugs
  • Many school infractions today involve
    prescription medications
  • A prescription drug is any medication which
    requires a pharmacist to dispense to a patient or
    their guardian under the direction of a
    physician.

9
Controlled Substances
  • A substance, including a drug, an adulterant, and
    a dilutant, listed in Schedules I-V or Penalty
    Groups 1-1A or 2-4 as defined by the Controlled
    Substances Act.
  • Controlled Substances Act, Chapter 481

10
Controlled Substances
  • Placement on a specific controlled substance
    schedule is based on
  • Existence of or lack of medical uses
  • Danger of physical or psychological dependence
  • Potential for abuse

11
Controlled Substances
  • Drug determined by DEA to have the potential for
    abuse
  • Most are legal with a Rx, for example
  • Hydrocodone
  • Oxycontin
  • Xanax
  • Valium
  • Some are illegal
  • Cocaine
  • Marijuana
  • Synthetic Marijuana
  • Some examples include

12
Psycho-Stimulants Ritalin, Adderall,
Concerta
  • Medical uses ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder)
    ADHD (Attention Deficit
    Hyperactivity Disorder)
  • Possible effects Dizziness, loss of appetite,
    irritability, palpitations, nervousness

13
Anti-Anxiety Xanax, Clonazepam, Valium
  • Medical uses Anxiety, panic disorders
  • Possible effects Drowsiness,
    light-headedness, confusion,
    nervousness, racing pulse rate, low
    blood pressure, tremors, slurred speech,
    addictive decreased respiration and pulse

14
Pain OxyContin, Hydrocodone, Vicodin
  • Medical uses Moderate to severe pain
  • Possible effects Drowsiness, sedation,
    nausea, mental cloudiness, addictive

15
Controlled Substances
  • Cheesea combination of heroin and Tylenol PM
  • Snorted
  • Sells for as little as 2 per hit
  • Often sold wrapped in notebook paper

16
Synthetic Marijuana
  • Referred to as Spice, K2, Kush, and Salvia
  • Mixture of herbs treated with a chemical and sold
    as incense
  • Manufacture, delivery or possession of a
    miscellaneous substance is now illegal in Texas.
  • Possible effects chest pain, heart
  • palpitations, drowsiness, hallucinations,
  • nausea and confusion
  • Controlled Substances Act, Chapter 481

17
Dangerous Drugs
  • A device or a drug that is unsafe for
    self-medication and that is not included in the
    Schedules I-V or Penalty Groups 1-4 of Chapter
    481.
  • Controlled Substances Act, Chapter 483

18
Dangerous Drugs
  • Any non-scheduled drug requiring a doctors Rx
  • Low potential for abuse
  • Some highly toxic and possibly fatale.g. Lithium

19
Some prescriptions that may be available to your
children come from
  • Your own medicine cabinet
  • Your childrens friends
  • Homes visited by your children
  • Some examples include

20
Antidepressant / Anti-Obsessional Prozac, Zoloft,
Wellbutrin
Medical uses Depression, obsessive-compulsive
disorder Possible effects Nervousness,
anxiety, insomnia, dizziness, hot flashes,
decreased appetite
21
Mood Stabilizers Depakote, Lithium
Medical Uses Seizure disorders,
bipolar Possible effects Drowsiness, tremors,
irregular heartbeat, Lithium toxicity,
diarrhea
22
Antipsychotic Risperdal, Zyprexa
Medical uses Psychosis (difficulty with thought
process) Possible effects Drowsiness, low
blood pressure, restlessness, involuntary
movement, rigidity of muscles Can be
fatal with one dose
23
How Does KISD Identify Drugs
  • School nurse
  • www.drugs.com
  • Law enforcement
  • Pharmacist
  • PDR Physicians Desk Reference

24
Alcohol
  • Most commonly abused drug among youth
  • Beer is the most popular alcoholic beverage
    followed by liquor
  • Nationally, 21 of students drank alcohol for the
    first time before the age of 13.

25
Inhalants
  • Often first substance abused by teens
  • Includes substances such as glue, magic markers,
    correction fluid, spray paint, etc.
  • Can cause long-term damage to brain, nerve cells,
    heart, lungs
  • Can cause suffocation and death

26
Over-the-Counter Medications
  • Cough suppressants such as Coricidin, (Triple C)
  • Vicks, Robitussin
  • Pseudoephedrines
  • Even Tylenol
  • Over-the-counter medications are not on
  • a drug schedule, but they may be abused by
    teens.

27
  • Do you know what signs to look for if your
    children become involved with illegal substances?

28
Signs to look for
  • It is a challenge to tell because mood swings and
    unpredictable behaviors are not uncommon for
    teens.
  • Be alert for two or more of the following
    indicators

29
Watch Tips for Parents
  • Change in clothing choices/personal grooming
  • Hostile/uncooperative attitude
  • Less interaction at home and school
  • Change of friends
  • Appetite/sleep changes
  • Change in grades
  • Unexplained cash

30
Possible Clues to Drug Use
  • Lighters
  • Matches
  • Drug drawings
  • Empty Rx containers
  • Cigarettes
  • Small baggies
  • Razorblades/small pocket knives
  • Pieces of foil
  • Faucet screens

31
More Clues
  • Pipes
  • Bongs
  • Magazines
  • Music

32
Popular Hiding Places
(Goal is concealment with accessibility)
  • Mint cans
  • Pen cases
  • Socks, wallets, pockets, hats, waistline
  • Lipstick containers
  • Flashlights
  • Make-up kits
  • Battery containers

33
Keep Your Eyes Open
  • The bedroom
  • The medicine cabinet
  • The house
  • The yard
  • The car
  • The neighbors
  • Childs friends
  • Family

34
Wise Up!
  • Do you know the consequences if your children
    have illegal substances at school?

35
Consequences
  • There MAY be legal consequences.
  • There WILL be school consequences.

36
Legal Consequences
  • Legal penalties are tied to schedules I-V
    (smaller numbers have more severe legal
    consequences).
  • Penalties for most illegal substance offenses in
    a school zone are enhanced to the next levelfor
    example, a Class A misdemeanor may become a state
    jail felony offense.

37
School Consequences
  • Each case involving illegal substances is unique
    and is investigated and evaluated by the
    administration on its own merits.
  • Cases are handled in accordance with KISD policy
    as noted in the student handbooks and Student
    Code of Conduct.

38
School Consequences
  • Any KISD student found to have
  • possessed
  • used or
  • delivered
  • any illegal substance at school or at a school
    activity is subject to disciplinary actions.

39
Range of School Consequences Possession and/or
use of a controlled substance or dangerous
drugTexas Education Code, 37.006 and
37.007
  • DAEP to expulsion depending on type of
    drug and amount possessed
  • DAEP length, 45 school days
  • Expulsion length, 90 school days

40
Range of School Consequences Delivery of
controlled substance or dangerous drug
Texas Education Code, 37.006 and 37.007
  • Expulsion
  • Length of expulsion, 90 school days

41
Range of School Consequences Marijuana or
synthetic marijuana offenses (possession, use,
and/or delivery)Texas Education Code,
37.006 and 37.007
  • DAEP to expulsion, depending on facts of the case
  • DAEP length, 45 school days
  • Expulsion length, 90 school days

42
Range of School Consequences Alcohol offenses
(possession, use, and/or delivery)Texas
Education Code, 37.006 and 37.007
  • DAEP to expulsion, depending on facts of the case
  • DAEP length
  • 1st offense 30 school days
  • 2nd subsequent offenses 45 school days
  • In grades 6-12
  • Expulsion length 90 school days

43
Wise Up!
  • Do you know what is considered a weapon and not
    allowed at school?

44
Examples of Weapons
  • Firearms
  • Starter Guns
  • Knives
  • Razors
  • Chemical weapons such as Mace
  • Explosive Devices
  • Club
  • Brass Knuckles
  • Switchblade Knife
  • Any article capable of inflicting serious bodily
    injury

45
Stars
Knives
Mace
Razor
Key chain knife
46
Explosive Device
Firearm
Club
47
Kitchen Knife
Switchblade Knife
Knuckles
48
Wise Up!
  • Do you know the consequences if your children
    have weapons at school?

49
Consequences
  • There MAY be legal consequences.
  • There WILL be school consequences.

50
Legal Consequences
  • A person commits an offense if the person
    intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly possesses
    a firearm, illegal knife, club, or prohibited
    weapon on the physical premises of a school,
    grounds or building on which school activity is
    conducted, or a public or private school
    transportation vehicle.
  • Chapter 46.01 of the Penal Code

51
Legal Consequences
  • Penalties for weapon offenses may range from a
    misdemeanor charge to a felony charge.

52
School Consequences
  • Each case involving a weapon is unique and is
    investigated and evaluated by the administration
    on its own merits.
  • Cases are handled in accordance with KISD policy
    as noted in the student handbooks and the Student
    Code of Conduct.

53
School Consequences
  • Any KISD student found to possess a weapon as
    defined in the student code of conduct or any
    similar article capable of inflicting serious
    bodily injury is subject to disciplinary action.

54
Range of Consequences
  • Possession or use of a weapon may result in
    suspension, annex placement, or expulsion
  • Length of annex placement 30 school days
  • Length of expulsion 90 school days
  • Texas Education Code, 37.006 and 37.007

55
Range of Consequences
  • Possession or use of an illegal knife, club, or
    prohibited weapon
  • Mandatory expulsion
  • Length of expulsion 90 school days
  • Possession or use of a firearm
  • Mandatory expulsion
  • Length of expulsion minimum of one calendar
    year
  • Texas Education Code, 37.007

56
  • IT IS NEVER TOO LATE TO INTERVENE
  • Always express an interest.
  • Children often imitate behaviors.
  • Education and communication are the keys.
  • Be alert to change.
  • Monitor what children are doing.
  • Dont assume it cant happen.
  • Set aside time for family.
  • Family Circle, The Agony What Every Parent Must
    Know. April, 2002.

57
KISD Elementary Interventions
  • K-5 Second Step Program
  • Elementary guidance lessons on drug awareness,
    character education, and social skills
  • KinderVision
  • Yell0-Dino
  • Elementary mentoring programs
  • Red Ribbon Week
  • DAVE (Drug and Violence Education) resources for
    teachers

58
Secondary KISD Interventions
  • Grade 6 Refusal Skills Program
  • Red Ribbon Week activities
  • Intermediate Leadership Conference
  • Human-canine team inspections
  • Drug prevention taught in health, PE, homemaking
    and science curricula
  • DAVE (Drug and Violence Education) resources for
    teachers
  • Shattered Dreams Program

59
Web Information
  • www.drugs.com
  • www.nida.nih.gov (Natl Institute on Drug Abuse)
  • www.health.org
  • www.teens.drugabuse.gov
  • www.theantidrug.com (National Youth Anti-Drug
    Media Campaign)
  • www.cdc.gov (Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance)
  • www.dshs.state.tx.us (Youth Risk Behavior Survey)

60
HELP
  • 1-800-662-HELP
  • Alcoholics Anonymous 713-686-6300
  • Houston Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse
    281-866-7557
  • Houston Northwest Rehab 281-353-8333
  • Palmer Drug Abuse Program 281-528-7908
  • The Right Step (Spring) 281-895-9331
  • Contact your school counselor or CYS worker for
    further information.

61
INTERVENTION SAVES LIVES
62
Acknowledgements
  • Russell Falyden, Assistant Principal, Katy High
    School
  • Randy Kirk, Principal, Klein Collins High School
  • Marc Smith, Principal, Klein Intermediate School
  • Guadalupe Rocha, Chief, KISD Police Department
  • Val Luedeker, Counselor, Doerre Intermediate
    School
  • Lori Cook, CYS Counselor, Klein Collins High
    School
  • Jeannie Connors, Counselor Coordinator, KISD
  • Laurie Combe, Nurse Coordinator, KISD
  • Mindy Spurlock, KISD Executive Director of School
    Administration
  • Kelly Schumacher, KISD Executive Director of
    School Administration
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