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Title: PowerPoint Presentation Author: GSugai Last modified by: Don Rolfe Created Date: 1/24/2000 4:19:46 PM Document presentation format: On-screen Show (4:3) – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: PBS


1
PBS Respect Responsibility
2
ClassroomManagement
  • Proven Strategies Now
  • Region XV
  • Presented by Don Rolfe
  • July 15,2011

3
Logistics
  • Lunch time- 1130
  • Breaks- Mid-morning and Afternoon.
  • Meet your needs.
  • Zero Noise Signal
  • Feel free to ask questions.

4
Opening Activity
  • Meet and Greet.
  • Discover the names of 5 participants.
  • Re-inforce them for being here.
  • Find out what inspires them.
  • Be prepared to share the information you
    discovered.

5
Objectives
  • Discuss the needs of the current generation of
    students.
  • Examine the generational implications for the
    classroom.
  • Examine the classroom structure requirements.

6
Objectives
  • Discuss the challenges facing the classroom.
  • Discuss the concept of No Limits.
  • Examine your role in surpassing limits.
  • Examine the role of inspiration in the classroom.

7
Objectives
  • Review the components of behavior.
  • Review the instructional requirements for the
    current and Y generations.
  • Discuss relationship building strategies.

8
Objectives
  • Examine the importance of Self-Determination.
  • Review the impact of Sensory Integration in the
    classroom and ways to support those needs.
  • Conduct role-plays utilizing learned behavioral
    management strategies.

9
Trends
  • There is limited time for Self-Determination
    component work.
  • There is a greater need for instruction that
    agrees with Visual/Movement Learning Systems.

10
Trends
  • There have been generational changes.
  • Needs of this current generation will impact
    instruction and classroom management.
  • Dealing with parents of the current will be
    challenging.

11
Generational Work
  • This is a great insight into where and why we
    are.
  • It helps to form lines of communication with
    students and parents.
  • It is important to understand it is just a limit
    to overcome..

12
Generational Work
  • Know your Generations
  • 4 Generations Birth Years
  • Traditionalists 1925-1942
  • Baby Boomers 1943-1960
  • Generation X 1961-1981
  • Generation Y 1982-2002

13
Generational Information
  • Traditionalists 1925-1942
  • Work style and value
  • Respect for rules, hierarchy and authority
  • Dedication, hard work
  • Loyalty
  • Sacrifice
  • Duty before fun
  • Value Tradition

14
Generational Work
  • Supportive Behaviors and Tips for Communicating
    with Traditionalists
  • By nature Traditionalists are private, the
    Silent Generation. Dont expect members of this
    generation to share their thoughts immediately.
  • For the traditionalist an educators word is
    his/her bond, so its important to focus on words
    rather than body language on inferences.

15
Generational Work
  • Face to face or written communication is
    preferred.
  • Dont waste their time or let them feel as though
    their time is being wasted.

16
Generational Work
  • Baby Boomers 1943-1960
  • Work Style and values
  • Work is a priority
  • Optimistic
  • Personal Fulfillment
  • Competitive
  • Value meaning

17
Generational Work
  • Supportive Behaviors and Tips For Communicating
    with Boomers
  • Boomers are the show me generation, so your
    body language is important when communicating.
  • Speak in open, direct style but avoid controlling
    language.

18
Generational Work
  • Present options to demonstrate flexibility in
    your thinking.

19
GENERATIONAL Work
  • Generation X 1961- 1981
  • Work style and values
  • Self-reliance
  • Desire flexibility
  • Skepticism
  • Technology
  • Informal
  • Value Balance (work/life)

20
Generational Work
  • Supportive Behaviors and Tips for Communicating
    with Gen Xers.
  • Use email as a primary communication tool.
  • Talk in short sounds bites to keep their
    attention.
  • Share information with them on a regular basis
    and strive to keep them in the loop.

21
Generational Work
  • Use an informal communication style.

22
Generational Work
  • Generation Y 1982-2002
  • Work style and values
  • Fast paced (multi-tasking/multi media)
  • Tenacity/Directness
  • Entrepreneurial
  • Global diversity (people/ perspective/access)
  • Technology savvy
  • Value fun

23
Generational Work
  • Supportive Behaviors and Tips for Communicating
    with Ys.
  • Use action words and challenge them at every
    opportunity.
  • They will resent it if you talk down to them.
  • Seek their feedback constantly and provide them
    with regular feedback.
  • Use humor and create a fun learning environment.
    Dont take yourself too seriously.

24
Generational Work
  • Encourage them to take risks so that they can
    explore new ways of learning.

25
Generations and K-12 Schools(2006)
  • Civic Leaders Boomers
  • Superintendents Boomer
  • Teachers Boomer, X Gen
  • HS students Gen YParents Boomers
  • K-6 parents X Students Y
  • Pre-school parents X Students Homeland

26
Generations and K-12 schools (2016)
  • Superintendents More X than Boomers
  • Teachers Boomer, X Gen, Y Gen
  • HS students Gen XParents Y
  • K-6 parents X Students Homeland
  • Pre-school parents Y Kids Homeland

27
Generational Thinking........
  • In the Millennial youth era, Gen X adults are not
    as willing as Boomers to believe that the
    brightest of their generation became K-12
    teachers and administrators.
  • And so they have become the leading advocates of
    vouchers, school choice and home schooling.

28
Adolescent Influences
1950s 1960s 1970s Today
1 Home Home Peer TV/Media
2 School Peers TV Peers
3 Church TV Home School
4 Peers School School Church
5 TV Church Church Home
29
Collaboration is the key....so what do we do
about it?
  • M E E T
  • M- Make time to discuss
  • E- Explore difference
  • E- Encourage respect
  • T- Take responsibilty

30
Meeting the Challenge
  • Structure in the Classroom must be examined.
  • Components of behavior must be understood.
  • Instruction for these students must be adapted.

31
Meeting the Challenge
  • Relationships must be built and students must be
    challenged.
  • Sensory Integration must be understood.
  • The uniqueness of these generations must be
    understood and adequately addressed.

32
Other Challenges
  • School-wide Positive Behavior Interventions and
    Strategies are not fully implemented.
  • The impact of meth is being felt.
  • Modern medical break-thrus will impact how we
    educate our children.

33
Other Challenges
  • Limited college curriculum relating to Behavior
    Management/Discipline..
  • The Rigor of STAAR.

34
Meeting the Challenge
  • This is what happens if the challenge is not
    met.........

35
(No Transcript)
36
Managing Limits
  • An incredible story.
  • Looking IN
  • Comparable to Conscious Discipline.
  • Cleaning that which separates you.

37
Structure
38
Few positive SW expectations defined, taught,
encouraged
39
Establish 3 to 5 Clearly Stated, Positive
Expectations
40
58
Teaching Matrix Teaching Matrix SETTING SETTING SETTING SETTING SETTING SETTING SETTING
Teaching Matrix Teaching Matrix All Settings Hallways Playgrounds Cafeteria Library/ Computer Lab Assembly Bus
Respect Ourselves Be on task. Give your best effort. Be prepared. Walk. Have a plan. Eat all your food. Select healthy foods. Study, read, compute. Sit in one spot. Watch for your stop.
Respect Others Be kind. Hands/feet to self. Help/share with others. Use normal voice volume. Walk to right. Play safe. Include others. Share equipment. Practice good table manners Whisper. Return books. Listen/watch. Use appropriate applause. Use a quiet voice. Stay in your seat.
Respect Property Recycle. Clean up after self. Pick up litter. Maintain physical space. Use equipment properly. Put litter in garbage can. Replace trays utensils. Clean up eating area. Push in chairs. Treat books carefully. Pick up. Treat chairs appropriately. Wipe your feet. Sit appropriately.
2. NATURAL CONTEXT
1. SOCIAL SKILL
Expectations
3. BEHAVIOR EXAMPLES

41
Typical Contexts/ Routines Classroom-Wide Rules/Expectations Classroom-Wide Rules/Expectations Classroom-Wide Rules/Expectations
Typical Contexts/ Routines Respect Others Respect Property Respect Self
All Use inside voice. Raise hand to answer/talk. Recycle paper. Put writing tools inside desk. Do your best. Ask.
Morning Meeting Eyes on speaker. Give brief answers. Put announcements in desk. Keep feet on floor. Put check by my announcements.
Homework Do own work. Turn in before lesson. Put homework neatly in box. Touch your work only. Turn in lesson on time. Do homework night/day before.
Transition Use inside voice. Keep hands to self. Put/get materials first. Keep hands to self. Have plan. Go directly.
I Need Assistance Raise hand or show Assistance Card. Wait 2 minutes try again. Have materials ready. Have plan. Ask if unclear.
Teacher Directed Eyes on speaker. Keep hands to self. Use materials as intended. Have plan. Ask.
Independent Work Use inside voice. Keep hands to self. Use materials as intended. Return with done. Use time as planned. Ask.
Problem to Solve Stop, Step Back, Think, Act Stop, Step Back, Think, Act Stop, Step Back, Think, Act
1. SOCIAL SKILL
2. NATURAL CONTEXT
3. BEHAVIOR EXAMPLES
42
Family Teaching Matrix Family Teaching Matrix SETTING SETTING SETTING SETTING SETTING SETTING SETTING
Family Teaching Matrix Family Teaching Matrix At home Morning Routine Homework Meal Times In Car Play Bedtime
Respect Ourselves
Respect Others
Respect Property
1. SOCIAL SKILL
2. NATURAL CONTEXT
Expectations
3. BEHAVIOR EXAMPLES

43
Teaching Academics Behaviors
57
44
Acknowledge Recognize
45
Recognize Expected Behavior (Students Staff)
46
Cougar Traits in the Community
Student Name __________________________________
Displayed the Cougar Trait of
Respect Responsibility Caring Citizenship (
Circle the trait you observed)Signature
_____________________________________________If
you would like to write on the back the details
of what you observed feel free! Thank you for
supporting our youth.
47
Student Learning Teams
  • The most effective approach to classroom
    management for cooperative learning is to create
    a team-based positive reward system.
  • This simply means giving your attention to the
    teams with right behavior.

48
Student Learning Teams
  • Research shows that if you pay attention to
    negative behavior observed in the classroom, the
    frequency of these behaviors will increase.

49
Student Learning Teams
  • Cooperative Learning Standards
  • Practice Active Listening
  • Help and encourage each other
  • Everyone participates
  • Explain your ideas/ Tell why.
  • Complete tasks

50
Student Learning Teams
  • 4-5 to a team.
  • Use the Zero noise signal.
  • Ask 3 before me.
  • Special Recognition
  • Numbered Heads Together
  • Think/Pair/Share

51
The Meet and Greet
  • Meet and greet at the door.
  • Look into the student eyes with warmth and a
    smile.
  • Acknowledge them for being in your class.
  • You reduce the probability of acting out behavior

52
Behavior
53
Components of Behavior
  • The Setting Events- Where the event takes place?
  • The Triggers- What happened right before the
    Behavior?
  • The Behavior- Can you observe it and measure it?
  • The Consequences- What happened right after the
    behavior?
  • The Function of the Behavior- What are they
    trying to get or avoid?

54
Components of Behavior
  • The Setting Events- How can the setting event be
    changed to address the problem?
  • The Triggers-Set up your own triggers to change
    behavior.
  • The Behavior- How can you directly change
    behavior?
  • The Consequences- How can you change the
    consequence?
  • The Function of the Behavior- It is always key to
    understand the function(s) of behavior.

55
Rachel
  • Rachel dresses in black every day, rarely
    interacts with teachers or other students,
    writes distributes poems stories about
    witchcraft, alien nations, gundams, other
    science fiction topics. When approached or
    confronted by teachers, she pulls hood of her
    black sweatshirt or coat over her head walks
    away. Mystified by Rachels behavior, teachers
    usually shake their heads let her walk away.
    Recently, Rachel carefully wrapped a dead
    squirrel in black cloth placed it on her desk.
    Other students became frightened when she began
    talking to it.

What would you do?
56
Tim
  • Describe the setting event.
  • What were the triggers?
  • What were the behaviors?
  • What were the consequences?
  • What was the functions of the behaviors?
  • What would you change to affect behavior?
  • How does your role apply to the code of conduct?

What would you do?
57
Basic Needs
  • Power- knowledge.
  • Belonging- love and attention.
  • Fun-learning.
  • Freedom-movement.
  • Safety- Most important for learning.
  • These needs hold the keys to problem-solving
    behavioral issues.

58
Instruction
59
Learning Systems
  • E. Arwood.
  • Auditory Learning System
  • Movement/Visual Learning System
  • Patterns vs. Concepts
  • Talk about it. Draw about it. Write about it.

60
Cognitive Collaboration
  • Students explain their understanding of
    materials.
  • Tell me more.
  • Students discover their limits.
  • A way to get material re-explained.

61
Generational Considerations
  • Fast paced.
  • Teach in chunks.
  • Use graphic organizers.
  • Utilize SESIR.
  • Challenge with Prediction.

62
Relationships
63
The Triangle
  • Rapport- The meet and greet is a great place to
    establish rapport.
  • Respect- You create the kind of respect you want
    in the classroom.
  • Leadership- Students will force you to be the
    leader in the classroom.

64
Power Struggles
  • You will never win.
  • You can never teach if you are in a power
    struggle.
  • Remember, you are the adult and teacher.
  • Always maintain dignity and respect.

65
Power Struggles
  • Avoid them if you can and yet address discipline
    issues.
  • Review strategies.
  • Move on and teach.
  • Develop more psychological distance.

66
Power Struggles
  • Be aware of vicarious re-inforcement.
  • Horses and rhinos.
  • Consideration of skill streaming and anger
    management.
  • Moral reasoning development.

67
Self-Determination
68
Self-Determination
  • Components
  • Self-awareness- Identify needs, interests,
    strengths, limitations and own values.
  • Self-advocacy- Assert wants, rights. Determine
    support needs. Conduct own affairs.

69
Self-Determination
  • Components
  • Self-efficacy- Expect to obtain goals.
  • Decision making- Set goals. Set standards.
    Identify information needed. Consider options.
    Consider best options. Develop plan.
  • Independent performance- Start tasks on time. Use
    self management strategies.

70
Self-Determination
  • Components
  • Independent strategies- Follow thru on plan.
  • Self-evaluation- Monitor task performance.
    Compare performance to standard. Determine
    whether plan is completed and goal met.

71
Self-Determination
  • Components
  • Adjustment- Change goal, standards, plan,
    strategies, support , persistently adjust and use
    feedback.

72
Sensory Integration
73
Sensory Integration
  • What is it?
  • Its the minds signal to the body to encourage
    what is needed to pay attention and be alert.
  • Wall/ Desk.
  • Shoe tapping...Pencil tapping.
  • Doodling. Who was the best?
  • The book strategy.
  • Jar Exercise- Heavy Muscles.
  • Students will always tell you what they need.

74
Role-Plays
75
Role-Plays-A
  • The meet and greet at the door.
  • Teach the expectations for walking into the
    cafeteria.
  • Teach the expectations for starting to work in
    the classroom.
  • Address a student talking too much.
  • Address a student tapping his pencil.

76
Role-Plays-B
  • Address student who doesnt want to answer the
    math problem 3x3.
  • Address student who wants to take over class.
  • Address student who wants to follow you around in
    class.
  • Address student who does not turn in homework.

77
Role-Plays-C
  • Address student who has an academic deficit.
  • Write 3-5 expectations for the classroom.
  • Acknowledge the work of a student.
  • Acknowledge the conduct of a student who has
    followed the rules.
  • Acknowledge a student who excelled.

78
Role-Plays-D
  • Acknowledge a student who has shown leadership
    skills.
  • Acknowledge a student who self advocated.
  • Acknowledge a student who followed thru on a
    plan.
  • Acknowledge a student who made a good choice.

79
Our Goal
  • My job is to make sure that students have the
    supports they need to excel as they work hard to
    make their dreams a reality.
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