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UNDERSTANDING CULTURAL DIFERENCES

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Title: UNDERSTANDING CULTURAL DIFERENCES Author: Christopher J. Noga Last modified by: Officer Neil Created Date: 6/18/2001 1:01:54 PM Document presentation format – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: UNDERSTANDING CULTURAL DIFERENCES


1
Officer Richard Neil (retired)
Community Diversity Part 2
2
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SPO3 7 ELEMENTS THAT MAKE PEOPLE DIFFERENT
  • RACE
  • VALUES
  • CULTURE
  • RELIGION
  • HERITAGE
  • SEXUAL ORIENTATION
  • ETHNICITY

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RACE
  • A local geographic or global human population,
    distinguished as a more or less distinct group by
    genetically transmitted physical characteristics
  • A group of people united or classified together
    on the basis of common history, nationality, or
    geographic distribution

6
Henry Louis Gates Jr.
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VALUES
  • Values are the beliefs that dictate how we see
    and perceive the world
  • Values are learned through
  • Family
  • Friends
  • Church
  • Peers
  • Television, Radio, Newspapers
  • Teachers

15
CULTURE
  • The knowledge, beliefs, and behaviors transmitted
    from one generation to the next
  • Is learned
  • Defines for us what is right and wrong
  • Defines the rules of behavior
  • Influences and shapes our world view

16
CULTURE
  • Customary beliefs of a racial, religious or
    social group
  • Social forms of a racial, religious or social
    group
  • Material traits of a racial, religious or social
    group
  • Culture is learned and transmitted by family

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CULTURE
  • Culture is fluid - constantly changing yet
    remains constant
  • Culture is shared and effectively defines the
    boundaries of different groups
  • Culture becomes part of the unconscious so that
    the characteristics of the
    culture become innate

19
CULTURE
  • Because culture is internalized so that learned
    behavior becomes natural and unconscious,
    individuals may

20
CULTURE
  • Respond favorably to behavior that is as
    predictable as ones own
  • (or)
  • Respond unfavorably to behavior that is peculiar
    or different and which may be seen as
    irresponsible, psychopathic, inferior or a result
    of improper upbringing

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AFRICA
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RELIGION
  • Within cultures, there may exist many different
    religions.
  • The values of religion will affect the
    perspective from which various sectors of a given
    society, race or population sees their
    environment and/or world view

25
HERITAGE
  • The characteristics, culture and traditions
    handed down from ones ancestors

26
SEXUAL ORIENTATION
  • This refers to a persons sexual identification
  • A group of people involving all races and cultures

27
FOUR COMPONENTS OF SEXUALITY
  • Biological Sex A persons biological state of
    maleness or femaleness determined at birth
  • Gender Identity Ones psychological sense of
    being male or female
  • Sexual Orientation A persons emotional,
    physical and sexual attraction to individuals of
    a particular gender
  • Social Sex Role Ones adherence to cultural
    norms for feminine and masculine behavior

28
ETHNICITY
  • Defined a group of people who share
    characteristics such as rituals, language,
    nationality, religion, in other words they share
    a common cultural heritage

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Identity is a component of ethnicity and a
frequent factor that influences law enforcement
interaction with public
  • Can include lack of understanding of the
    practices of a specific ethnic group that could
    lead to undue friction between law enforcement
    and the public
  • Community ethnic diversity is becoming more
    common in general and in the ranks of law
    enforcement specifically
  • Officers must be cognizant of ethnic differences
    and sensibilities of such when interacting with
    the public and law enforcement colleagues
  • Ethnic misconceptions, jokes, slurs, etc. can be
    very disruptive

31
Takeshi Yoshihara
  • U.S. Naval Academy Graduate, rose to the rank of
    Captain
  • Not a good candidate no extra-curriculars
  • Lived in a single room dwelling covered in tar
    paper, along with 7 siblings in Idaho
  • Was prone to being sea sick and was nearly kicked
    out of the program
  • Commander Joseph Taussig, USS Nevada
  • Became the first Japanese-American graduate
    because he was honest

32
Japanese American Internment Camps
  • 1942 over 110,000 Japanese Americans relocated to
    War Relocation Camps from the west coast.
  • Only 1,800 of the over 150,000 from Hawaii were
    interned.
  • Of those interned 62 were American Citizens.
    About 80,000 were nisei.
  • 1988, President Ronald Reagan signed legislation
    which apologized for the
    internment on behalf
    of the U.S. government.

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  • 1905, California's anti-miscegenation law
    outlawed marriages between Caucasians and
    Mongolians
  • In October 1906, the San Francisco Board of
    Education separated the Japanese students from
    the Caucasian students.
  • 1924 "Oriental Exclusion Law," which blocked
    Japanese immigrants from attaining citizenship in
    California.

35
  • Lieutenant General John L. DeWitt, who
    administered the internment program, repeatedly
    told newspapers that "A Jap's a Jap" and
    testified to Congress, I don't want any of them
    persons of Japanese ancestry here.
    They are a dangerous
    element.

36
  • There is no way to determine their loyalty... It
    makes no difference whether he is an American
    citizen, he is still a Japanese. American
    citizenship does not necessarily determine
    loyalty... But we must worry about the Japanese
    all the time until he is wiped off the map.

37
  • Austin E. Anson, managing AG secretary - "We're
    charged with wanting to get rid of the Japs for
    selfish reasons. We do. It's a question of
    whether the white man lives on the Pacific Coast
    or the brown men. They came into this valley to
    work, and they stayed to take over... If all the
    Japs were removed tomorrow, we had never miss
    them in two weeks, because the white farmers can
    take over and produce everything the Jap grows.
    And we do not want them back when the war ends,
    either.

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  • Los Angeles Times - "A viper is nonetheless a
    viper wherever the egg is hatched... So, a
    Japanese American born of Japanese parents,
    nurtured upon Japanese traditions, living in a
    transplanted Japanese atmosphere...
    notwithstanding his nominal brand of accidental
    citizenship almost inevitably and with the rarest
    exceptions grows up to be a Japanese, and not an
    American... while we are at war with their race.
    (cont.)

40
  • Thus, while it might cause injustice to a few to
    treat them all as potential enemies, I cannot
    escape the conclusion... that such treatment...
    should be accorded to
    each and all of them
    while we are at war
    with their race."

41
  • Internment of Japanese Americans, who provided
    critical agricultural labor on the West Coast,
    created a labor shortage.
  • Which was exacerbated by the induction of many
    American laborers into the Armed Forces.
  • This vacuum precipitated
    a mass immigration of
    Mexican workers known
    as the Bracero Program.

42
  • After the expiration of the initial agreement in
    1947, the program was continued in agriculture
    under a variety of laws and administrative
    agreements until its formal end in 1964.
  • In the 1930s, during the
    Great Depression, over
    500,000 Mexican
    Americans were
    deported or pressured
    to leave, during the
    Mexican Repatriation.

43
442nd Regimental Combat Team
  • Asian American unit composed of mostly Japanese
    Americans.
  • The families of many of its soldiers were subject
    to internment.
  • Famously rescued the "Lost
    Battalion- 800 casualties with
    121 dead to rescue 211.
  • Fought with uncommon
    distinction in Italy, southern
    France, and Germany.

44
442nd Regimental Combat Team
  • The unit became the most highly decorated
    regiment in the history of U.S. Armed Forces.
  • U.S. Army battle reports show the official
    casualty rate, combining KIA (killed) with MIA
    (missing) and WIA (wounded and removed from
    action) total was 93.

45
The Purple Heart Battalion
  • Members received 18,143 awards
  • 9,486 Purple Hearts for 3,000 soldiers
  • 7 Presidential Unit Citations (5 earned in one
    month)
  • 52 Distinguished Service Crosses
  • 560 Silver Stars with 28 second awards
  • 22 Legion of Merits
  • 15 Soldiers Medals
  • 4,000 Bronze Stars with 1,200 second awards
  • 21 Congressional Medals of Honor

46
President Harry Truman
  • You fought not only the enemy, but you fought
    prejudice and you have won.

47
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48
Officer Richard Neil (retired)
www.officerneil.com
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