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8 PRINCIPLES FOR PROMOTING POSITIVE BEHAVIOUR IN THE CLASSROOM

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8 PRINCIPLES FOR PROMOTING POSITIVE BEHAVIOUR IN THE CLASSROOM SDPI SUMMER SCHOOL ... Fred Jones suggest that by investing the time at beginning of year pays off. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: 8 PRINCIPLES FOR PROMOTING POSITIVE BEHAVIOUR IN THE CLASSROOM


1
8 PRINCIPLES FOR PROMOTING POSITIVE BEHAVIOUR IN
THE CLASSROOM
  • SDPI SUMMER SCHOOL
  • JUNE 22ND 2010
  • MARY BLACK, NBSS

2
What is Disruptive Behaviour? ___________________
______
  • a schools intrinsic role is to provide
    teaching and promote learning for its student
    body. Consequently, any event or incident that
    frustrates this process can be characterised as
    disruptive behaviour.
  • School Matters 2006

3
The Nature of Disruption ________________________
  • Non-stop talking
  • Coming late to class
  • Failure to bring materials
  • Challenging authority
  • Ignoring the teacher
  • Refusal to follow instruction
  • Inappropriate language
  • Making noise
  • Rummaging in bags
  • Taunting others
  • Slagging
  • Eating and chewing gum
  • Cyber bullying

4
What is the Impact?
  • Behaviour leading teaching and choice of
    methodology
  • Lack of connection to the central function of
    learning
  • Reactive instead of proactive
  • Well behaved students are disengaging
  • Teacher stress and loss
  • Teacher isolation and deskilling
  • Student life choices and opportunities are
    compromised

5
NBSS Support
6
  • Effective teachers influence and manage the
    choices children make about their behaviour (
    Hook and Vass,2004)

7
What is a Positive Approach? __________________
___________
  • An emphasis on positive statements
  • Teaching students the social skills they need to
    be successful
  • Re-directing the students towards desired
    behaviour
  • A reward system in place

8
  • Where good behaviour is reinforced and
    acknowledged, it is more likely that it will
    become internalised. Public acknowledgement of
    positive student behaviour also helps to promote
    a sense of community within a school.
  • School Matters The report of the Task Force on
    Student Behaviour in Second Level Schools (2006)
    p.75

9
  • Whatever incentives teachers use it is essential
    that our characteristic teaching practice
    includes the principles of supportive and
    descriptive feedback and encouragement to our
    students regarding their effort, their goodwill,
    their contribution, and their thoughtful and
    cooperative behaviour even if they are supposed
    to be doing that anyway! Like us, students
    benefit from and even look for
    acknowledgement and affirmation
  • Class Room Behaviour Rogers, B.(2000)

10
Routines
  • Consistency
  • Predictability Students like to know the
    routine and the consequences
  • The outstanding teacher communicates high
    expectations and then teaches procedures to
    facilitate them. (www.MarvinMarshall.com, 2002)
  • Routines and procedures around
  • Entry to class
  • Registration
  • Asking permission
  • Organisation of equipment
  • Change of activity
  • Signals for gaining attention
  • Exit

11
Planning for Positive Interventions ______________
______________
  • 8 Core Principles
  • The following principles are taken from the
    work of Peter Hook and Andy Vass

12

13
8 Principles ______________________
  • Plan for good behaviour
  • Prevention strategies
  • Curriculum organisation inter personal
  • Separate the inappropriate behaviour from the
    student

14
8 Principles _______________________
  • 3. Use the language of choice
  • 4. Focus on primary behaviours
  • 5. Actively build trust and support

15
8 Principles _____________________
  • 6. Model the behaviour that you wish to see
  • 7. Follow up on issues that count
  • 8. Re-connect and repair the relationship

16
Battle Zone or Learning Zone
Tim OBrien 1998
17
Initiating Statements
  • Initiating statements teach good behaviour by
    naming what you want from the student
  • Pauline, face forward and listen. Thank you.
  • John, I want you to lower your voice so we can
    talk. Thank you

18
When things escalate
  • Remember You are in an escalating situation when
    you are
  • - Answering pointless questions
  • - Starting to argue
  • - Trying to persuade
  • - Justifying your requests
  • - Explaining things over and over
  • - Using an aggressive tone of voice
  • - Changing your requirements
  • - Making exceptions
  • - Completing the work for them

19
  • Some useful strategies

20
Flip the Script
  • David, let me see if I understand what you are
    saying
  • Number one
  • Two
  • Three
  • Is that right?
  • I cant do anything about that now but

21
Alpha Commands
  • Give specific instructions with no more than 2
    directions
  • David, I want you to face forward and start
    question one.
  • Give clear and direct instructions.
  • Allow take-up time

22
Broken Record Technique
  • Keep repeating the same message in a calm voice
  • Identify the goal and make a clear statement.
  • Pepper the broken record technique with empathy!
  • I know that you are frustrated but I need you to
    calm down before we can talk.

23
  • The most important motivator is the teacher and
    his/her belief in the child Rogers, (2000)

24
  • Thank You!
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