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High School Redesign: Getting a Workable Model

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High School Redesign: Getting a Workable Model Gene Bottoms Senior Vice President Southern Regional Education Board gene.bottoms_at_sreb.org Policies for Achieving High ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: High School Redesign: Getting a Workable Model


1
High School RedesignGetting a Workable Model
Gene Bottoms Senior Vice President Southern
Regional Education Board gene.bottoms_at_sreb.org
2
Policies for Achieving High-Performing Schools
  • Rigor achieved
  • Focus partially achieved
  • Relevance partially achieved
  • Engaging assignments not addressed
  • Relationship and Support weak
  • Improved transitions weak
  • Leadership not addressed

3
Strengths of the Current Louisiana Graduation
Policy
  • Four years of mathematics, Algebra I and higher
  • Options fourth science course under core 4
  • Academic concentration (complete core 4) and
    academic endorsement core 4 added requirement
  • CT concentration (4 primary credits and 2 related
    credits) and CT endorsement

4
Gaps in Existing Policies
  • Higher value placed on academic endorsement than
    on CT endorsement
  • 11th grade is too late for many students to
    choose a default program of study
  • Fails to recognize alternative assessment beyond
    English/reading and mathematics
  • Simplify endorsement requirements and provide
    incentive to increase number earning endorsement

5
Why a Rigorous Academic Core?More Students Meet
Readiness Goals
Career Cluster Mathematics Academic Core Completed 2 to 3 Parts 0 to 1 Part Mathematics Academic Core Completed 2 to 3 Parts 0 to 1 Part Gap
Agriculture 75 44 31
Business 70 45 25
Health Sciences 73 39 34
Hospitality/FamilyConsumer Sci. 59 35 24
Manufacturing/ Transportation 62 44 18
STEM 83 55 28
Source 2006 HSTW Assessment
6
How many students in CT courses meet college- and
career-readiness goals without completing
HSTW-recommended curriculum?
7
Percentages of CT Graduates Meeting Readiness
Goals without Completing the HSTW-Recommended
Curriculum
Career Cluster Reading Math
Agriculture 38 44
Business 39 45
STEM 45 55
Health Sciences 40 39
Hospitality 36 35
Manufacturing and Transportation 35 44
Source HSTW Assessment
8
Gaps in Existing Policies
  • Absence of adequate incentives and optional
    pathways for poorly-prepared students to graduate
    from high school prepared for postsecondary
    studies and careers
  • Require students to complete a concentration, but
    no requirement that schools increase the
    percentage of students earning an endorsement by
    program
  • Fail to present an optional ways for becoming a
    high-performing school

9
Gaps in Existing Policies
  • Do not address transitions from middle grades to
    ninth-grade and from senior year to college and
    careers
  • Need to encourage non-traditional approaches to
    advancing student achievement
  • Stress the quality of guidance and advisement
    needed
  • Do not address expectations for district and
    school leaders to engage students, teachers and
    parents for improved results.

10
Guiding Principles of High-Performing High
Schools to Engage All Students in Challenging
Learning
  • Each student is pursuing a career-focused program
    aligned with his or her talents, interests and
    aspirations and aligned to grade-level and to
    college- and career-readiness standards core 4
    and core 4 plus.
  • Each student in academic, CT and fine arts
    classes has intellectually challenging
    assignments built around authentic, real-world
    tasks and rich in opportunities to
  • solve problems.
  • make decisions.
  • use academic knowledge and skills.
  • reflect on and assess performance and technical
    and academic knowledge gained.
  • maintain a reflect by a portfolio of work
    accomplished and learning acquired.

11
Guiding Principles of High-Performing High
Schools to Engage All Students in Challenging
Learning
  • Each student is enrolled in courses where
    expectations regarding quality of work are clear
    and redo opportunities are expected until
    standards are met.
  • Each student has a continuing opportunity to
    investigate, explore and reflect on his/her
    talents, interests and aspirations and to make
    adjustments in learning experiences and the
    customized program of study.

12
Guiding Principles of High-Performing High
Schools to Engage All Students in Challenging
Learning
  • Each student is enrolled in academic, fine arts
    and CT courses where teachers communicate
    frequently and help students make connections in
    learning assignments.
  • School leaders and teachers use data to drive
    improvements in school and classroom practices,
    achievement, aptitude, interests, students
    perceptions, etc.

13
Expansion of Louisianas Graduation Opportunities
  • Develop policies and initiatives to reduce the
    number of students leaving grade eight unprepared
    for high school studies.
  • Study successful efforts in accelerating
    mathematics achievement in middle grades
    (Delaware, Maryland, Texas and Virginia).
  • Study Floridas legislation on the middle grades,
    which places a strong emphasis on career
    exploration and accelerating middle grades
    curriculum with a special emphasis on adolescent
    literacy. (See SREB draft report.)

14
Replace the Minimum with Accelerated
Career-Focused Program of Study
  • Set aside the requirement that all students
    participate in the core 4 curriculum for a
    minimum of 2 years.
  • Provide incentives to districts and schools to
    redesign their ninth grade.
  • Establish a vision and criteria for ninth-grade
    redesign.
  • Reward schools that are successful in raising
    achievement and graduation rates of at-risk
    students.

15
Create an Accelerated Career-Focused Program of
Study
  • Allow at-risk entering ninth-graders to choose a
    career-focused program of study that is organized
    into a coherent sequence of school-based and
    work-site learning experiences and includes at
    least two CT credits per year.
  • Greater emphasis on project and problem-based
    learning that integrates academic and technical
    content

16
Create an Accelerated Career-Focused Program of
Study
  • Require students in a career-focused program to
  • complete at least four years of mathematics,
    including Algebra I and geometry.
  • pass the GEE exams in English/language arts and
    mathematics, and choose other optional
    requirements to meet graduation requirements.

17
Create an Accelerated Career-Focused Program of
Study
  • Consider a variety of options for teaching
    Algebra I to a full range of students.
  • Allow school districts to adopt an applied
    Algebra I, geometry and Algebra II series.
  • Allow algebra and geometry to be taught through
    approved hybrid courses developed collaboratively
    by mathematics and CT teachers.
  • Commission a study on the effectiveness of taking
    2 years to teach Algebra I.

18
Create an Accelerated Career-Focused Program of
Study
  • Award grants to schools that are willing to
    develop and implement an improvement plan that
    meets established criteria.
  • At the end of the four years, allow schools to
    continue to receive the grants if they have met
    and continue to meet the targets for increased
    graduation rates.

19
Beyond Tracking Multiple Pathways to College,
Careers and Civic Participation
  • Consider offering same weight in the index for
    academic endorsement and a CT endorsement.
  • Consider giving greater weight to schools who
    take at-risk students entering grade nine below
    grade level and who then complete the
    career-focused program of study option.
  • Allow students choosing a career-focused program
    of study in grade nine to opt into either core 4
    or core 4 plus.

20
Beyond Tracking Multiple Pathways to College,
Careers and Civic Participation
  • Allow students in the career-focused pathway to
    take the same CT credits as students who earn the
    ct endorsement.
  • Emphasize reading, writing, listening and
    speaking for learning in all courses in the
    career-focused, advanced academic and technical
    endorsement programs of study. (See SREB
    adolescent literacy report.)

21
Expand Key Goals to Include
  • Reduce failure rates in the middle grades and
    ninth grade, and increase the percentage of
    students meeting grade-level standards.

22
Expand Strategic Intent to Include
  • Improve transitions from the middle grades to
    ninth grade and from the senior year to
    postsecondary studies and careers.
  • Create a reflective school leadership team that
    focuses on continuous improvement of school and
    classroom practices.
  • Instill the value that failure is not an option
    and having all students meet standards is the
    mission of he school.
  • Form partnerships to make use of community work
    sites, virtual learning opportunities and
    postsecondary institutions to achieve key goals.
  • Redesign career/technical courses so students use
    academic and technical knowledge and skills to
    complete intellectually demanding, authentic
    assignments.

23
Expand Strategic Intent to Include
  • Broaden the high school redesign to focus on
    establishing readiness for the ninth grade and
    the redesign of the ninth grade as a major
    statewide educational priority. (See HSTW
    Ninth-Grade Redesign report.)
  • Define ninth-grade readiness standards, and
    benchmark for success in Algebra I in grade nine,
    college-preparatory-level language arts and
    science.
  • Identify students early in the middle grades who
    are at risk of being unprepared for high school
    and provide a system of accelerated instruction
    and support. Study the Texas and Virginia
    approaches.

24
Expand Strategic Intent to Include
  • Require accelerated intensive academic help in
    reading and mathematics for students before they
    begin the ninth grade or early in the ninth-grade
    year.
  • Redesign the ninth grade so students who are
    behind receive the help they need to catch up,
    particularly in reading and mathematics.
  • Make the emphasis in middle grades and early high
    school on having students meet standards, not on
    failure.

25
Establish a statewide process for determining
high school juniors readiness for college and
careers.
  • Allow students who are ready for postsecondary
    study at the end of the junior year to earn at
    least nine semester hours of credit during the
    senior year.
  • Enroll students who are planning to enroll in
    postsecondary studies but who fail to meet
    readiness standards in specially designed
    mathematics and English transitional courses the
    senior year.
  • Use the senior year to allow students who are not
    planning to attend college to earn employer
    certification.

26
Redesign high school CT courses and make them
more intellectually demanding .
  • Identify the most essential reading, writing,
    mathematics and science standards that are needed
    for work and further study.
  • Establish a process to support teams of
    outstanding academic and CT teachers and experts
    from the technical field to prepare course
    syllabi for each CT course.
  • Develop authentic problems and projects to engage
    students in using essential college-readiness
    standards.
  • Train teachers to use the course syllabi, using
    the AP model.
  • Create a repository of these syllabi and projects
    for all schools to share.

27
Recognize and encourage good CT instruction that
can foster 21st-century skills/intellectually
challenging work.
  • Trouble-shooting and problem-solving skills
  • Use of research skills to collect and organize
    information into a work plan
  • Use of mathematics to support decision-making and
    planning
  • Use of writing to aid learning and to complete
    tasks
  • Communication and interaction with adults outside
    the school
  • A setting where students experiment, invent,
    design and construct

28
Gains in Number of CT Students Per 100 Meeting
Readiness Goals Who Experienced 21st-Century
Assignments
Source HSTW Assessment
29
Success Stories
Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical
Center Franklin, Massachusetts Rigorous,
Intellectually Demanding Assignments
30
Expand Students Opportunities for Study in
High-Quality, High-Demand CT Fields
  • Dual credit courses meeting established standards
  • Career academies
  • Adopt new kinds of programs such as PLTWs
    pre-engineering and biomedical science curricula
  • Formulate an apprenticeship program similar to
    the one that has been developed by the state of
    Georgia and other proven work-site learning models

31
Average Point Gain in Achievement Scores on HSTW
Assessment2004 to 2006
100 Non-Improved Sites 100 Most-Improved Sites
Reading -11 15
Mathematics -8 12
Science -12 16
Source 2004 and 2006 HSTW Assessments Source 2004 and 2006 HSTW Assessments Source 2004 and 2006 HSTW Assessments
32
Average Point Changes in Reading Achievement
100 Non-Improved Sites 100 Most-Improved Sites
All Students -11 15
Black -12 16
White -10 13
Parents w/ no college education -11 14
Parents w/ some college education -11 14
Source 2004 and 2006 HSTW Assessments Source 2004 and 2006 HSTW Assessments Source 2004 and 2006 HSTW Assessments
33
Average Point Changes in Mathematics Achievement
100 Non-Improved Sites 100 Most-Improved Sites
All Students -8 12
Black -9 13
White -6 11
Parents w/ no college education -7 11
Parents w/ some college education -8 12
Source 2004 and 2006 HSTW Assessments Source 2004 and 2006 HSTW Assessments Source 2004 and 2006 HSTW Assessments
34
Average Point Changes in Science Achievement
100 Non-Improved Sites 100 Most-Improved Sites
All Students -12 16
Black -12 19
White -10 15
Parents w/ no college education -11 17
Parents w/ some college education -12 16
Source 2004 and 2006 HSTW Assessments Source 2004 and 2006 HSTW Assessments Source 2004 and 2006 HSTW Assessments
35
Changes in Percentages of Students Completing
HSTW-Recommended Academic Curriculum 2004 to 2006
36
Changes in Percentages of Students Experiencing
HSTW Indicators at Most-Improved and Non-Improved
Schools 2004 -2006
Expectations
Literacy
Numeracy
Science
Quality CT
Work-based Learning
Guidance
Extra Help
High School Importance
37
Resources for Your Consideration
  • Beyond Tracking Multiple Pathways to College,
    Career and Civic Participation, edited by Jeannie
    Oakes and Marsha Saunders, Harvard Educational
    Press
  • The Mind At Work Valuing the Intelligence of the
    American Worker, Mike Rose
  • Crafting a New Vision for High School How States
    Can Join Academic and Technical Studies to
    Promote More Powerful Learning
  • Lost in Transition Building a Better Path from
    School to College and Careers

38
Resources for Your Consideration
  • Preparing Middle Grades Students for High School
    Success
  • A Critical Mission Making Adolescent Reading a
    priority in SREB States
  • Redesigning the Ninth Grade Experience
  • Measuring Technical and Academic Achievement
    Employer/Certification Examinations role in High
    School Assessment
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