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Stockton Unified School District Superintendent

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Stockton Unified School District. SUSD is a Pre-K - Adult District. 57 Total Schools. 42 K 8 Schools. 1 Alternative 4 8 School. 4 Comprehensive High Schools – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Stockton Unified School District Superintendent


1
Stockton Unified School DistrictSuperintendents
Office
  • State of
  • Stockton Unified School District and Leadership
  • Presentation to
  • Center for Professional and Continuing Education
  • Presenter Carl Toliver, Superintendent

2
Stockton Unified School District
  • SUSD is a Pre-K - Adult District
  • 57 Total Schools
  • 42 K 8 Schools
  • 1 Alternative 4 8 School
  • 4 Comprehensive High Schools
  • 7 Small High Schools
  • Two new sites opening 2011-12
  • 1 Adult School
  • 1 Young Adult Program Special Education
  • 1 Special Center Walton
  • 51 Preschool Programs

3
Stockton Unified School District
  • Largest district in San Joaquin County
  • 17th Largest school district in California
  • 2nd Highest employer in San Joaquin County
  • 3,601 Full and Part Time Employees
  • 2,087 Certificated
  • 1,514 Classified

4
Stockton Unified School District
  • Total number of students enrolled in SUSD
  • for 2011-12
  • ? Districtwide 37,140
  • ? K-8 24,383
  • ? High School 8,326
  • ? School for Adults 778
  • ? Walton Special Center 95
  • ? District Charter Schools 2,314
  • ? Special Education 1,244

5
Stockton Unified School District
  • Ethnic Breakdown

6
Stockton Unified School District
  • Ethnic Breakdown in the City of Stockton

7
Stockton Unified School District
  • Mission Statement
  • The students of Stockton Unified School
  • District are our most valuable resource and
  • together with our community, we have an
  • obligation to provide them with a world-
  • class education. It is our solemn responsibility
    to
  • provide every student with high quality
  • instruction, a well rounded educational
  • experience, and the necessary support to succeed.

8
Stockton Unified School District
  • Superintendents Goals
  • Every student by the end of 3rd grade will read
    and comprehend at the proficient level.
  • Every student by the end of 8th grade will
    demonstrate mastery of Algebra concepts and
    applications.
  • Every student by the end of 12th grade will
    graduate and be college and career ready.

9
Stockton Unified School District
  • Accomplishments for 2010 2011
  • Decreased district expulsion rate by 58
  • Decreased the number of habitual truants by 20
  • Provided 197 flu clinics at our sites
  • 11,952 free vaccines were administered to
    students
  • Over 2,700 students received free dental care
    through our Mobile Dentist partnership
  • SUSD leads the county in the new Pertussis (Tdap)
    requirement with 100 compliant
  • 13, 617 students participated in our After School
    Programs
  • Students in our After School Programs showed a
    marked increase in attendance, behavior and
    academic achievement

10
Stockton Unified School District
  • 1,331 students participated in our Preschool
    programs
  • Preschool students scored higher on benchmark
    assessments in both ELA and Math
  • Creation of a new Young Adult program on the
    Miracle Mile
  • Implementation of the Jose Valdes Math Program
  • Began preparation for the new Health Careers
    Academy (HCA) at University Park to open August
    2011
  • Established the new Pacific Law Academy
  • Established the Trades/Technical program in the
    Engineering Smaller Learning Community (SLC) at
    Edison High School

11
Stockton Unified School District
  • Completed the School Improvement Grant (SIG) for
    seven K-8 schools in the amount of 33 million
  • Increased percentage of Grade 10 students meeting
    the CAHSEE graduation requirement by 5
  • District brought back Visual and Performing Arts
    (VAPA) program to K-8 sites
  • Successful completion of four dependent charter
    school applications
  • Health Careers Academy (HCA)
  • Nightingale Charter School
  • Primary Years Academy (PYA)
  • Stockton Law Academy

12
Stockton Unified School District
Graduation, Attendance Dropout Data
2009 2010 2010 2011
Overall Attendance 93.4 94.24 Over 1million potential earnings in ADA
Graduation Rate 65 Approx. 70 District projected
Dropout Rate 34.8 Approx. 21-22 District projected
Improvement made in ALL areas
13
Stockton Unified School District
  • Completed Construction Projects
  • Walton Center Modernization Phase I
  • Franklin HS Parking Lot
  • Edison, Franklin and Stagg HS construction
    Phase I II
  • Stagg HS Sports Complex
  • El Dorado School modernization
  • Grunsky School modernization
  • Completed two new classrooms at Nightingale
    School

14
Stockton Unified School District
  • Specialized Programs
  • K 8 Sites
  • Primary Years Academy / Pre-International
    Baccalaureate Program (IB) Prep
  • Commodore Stockton Skills
  • Kohl Open School
  • Hamilton Health Education Leadership (HEAL)
  • Marshall/Basfield Science Aeronautics Program
  • Pittman Dual Immersion Program
  • Fremont Fine Performing Arts Magnet
  • Hazelton Academic Center for Talent (ACT)
  • Valenzuela Spanish Language Arts Program

15
Stockton Unified School District
  • High School
  • International Baccalaureate (IB) Program at
    Franklin High School with Middle Years Academy
    (MYP) for pre-IB studies
  • Stockton Early College Academy (SECA)
  • Weber Institute of Applied Science and Technology
  • Stockton High School Alternative (Digital)
    Education
  • Jane Frederick High School Continuation Program
  • Stagg Journalism Magnet
  • Chavez High School Visual Performing Arts
    Magnet
  • Edison High School Engineering Magnet
  • Edward C. Merlo Institute of Environmental
    Technology

16
Stockton Unified School District
  • New Programs Opening 2011-12 Pacific Law Academy
  • Set to open July 2011
  • Focus Pre Law and Law Enforcement
  • Location Adjacent to Stagg High School campus
  • 300 500 students (potential)
  • Partnership with UOP/McGeorge School of Law
  • Charter School (dependent)
  • UC a-g requirements
  • College course prerequisites

17
Stockton Unified School District
  • Comparative District Data for Dropouts,
    Truancies, Suspensions, and Expulsions

18
Stockton Unified School District
  • Graduation Rates

SUSD Graduation rates for class of 2009-10
69.6 base on NCES definition of 4 year cohort. 
(rate for 2010-11 is not available yet)
19
Stockton Unified School District
  • Students Attending College

Number of SUSD graduates that enrolled in
California public colleges (UC, CSU, and
community colleges) in 2010 755.    The 2011
data is not yet available.
20
Stockton Unified School District
  • Goals for Curriculum
  • The District articulates its plan of action
    through the Local
  • Education Agency (LEA) plan that states
    specifically how to
  • support schools and our employees in the pursuit
    of
  • achieving these outcomes. The LEA plan is built
    on the
  • premise that these three outcomes are measured by
    two goals
  • and supported by two major cross-cutting
    strategies. These
  • strategies are
  • - High quality delivery of the core curriculum
    that includes
  • understanding content, receiving training on
    teaching
  • standards from the curriculum, and
  • - High quality teaching based on the practice
    of direct-
  • interactive instruction (DII).

21
School Improvement Grant
  • SUSD Awarded 34 Million Dollars to Reform Seven
    Identified Persistently Low Performing Schools

22
School Turn Around History 2010
  • Persistently Low Achieving Schools identified by
    State as lowest 5 of state schools.
  • Calculated proficiency rate in L/A and math over
    3 year period, 2006 07, 2007 08, 2008 09.
  • Schools exempt if API growth 50 points over 5
    year period.

23
187 Persistently Low Achieving Schools in
California identified
  • 84 Elementary Schools
  • 46 Middle Schools
  • 57 High Schools
  • All 187 persistently low performing schools must
    start process of identifying intervention model
    in preparation to apply for SIG grant.

24
Intervention Models
  • 1) The Turnaround Model
  • 2) The Restart Model
  • 3) The Transformational Model
  • 4) School Closure

25
Turnaround Model
  • Replace principal
  • New principal given flexibility over staffing,
    scheduling, and budgeting to implement model to
    improve student outcomes.
  • Implement financial incentives, opportunities for
    career growth, and flexible work conditions to
    place staff needed to turn around school.
  • Staff provided with ongoing, high quality
    targeted PD.

26
Turnaround Model (continued)
  • Governance structure
  • Report to turnaround office in LEA or state
    agency.
  • Hire leader who reports directly to
    superintendent.
  • Enter in multi-year agreement with LEA or state
    agency.
  • Implement instructional program that is
    researched based and vertically aligned across
    grade spans.

27
Turnaround Model (continued)
  • Continuous use of student data (formative,
    interim, and summative) to inform differentiated
    instruction for individual academic needs of
    students.
  • Schedules adopted that increase learning time.
  • Provide social-emotional and community oriented
    services and student support.

28
The Restart Model
  • LEA converts a school or reopens school under a
    charter operator.
  • Agency in charge selected after rigorous review
    process.
  • Restart model must enroll, within grades it
    serves, any former students who wishes to attend.

29
The Transformation Model
  • Replace principal (who led school prior to move
    to transformation model).
  • Use rigorous, transparent, and equitable
    evaluation system that takes into account
    improving student performance data.
  • Identify and reward leaders, teachers, and staff
    who have increased student achievement.
  • Remove staff who, after ample opportunities to
    improve, fail to do so.

30
The Transformation Model (continued)
  • Provide ongoing high quality PD aligned to
    schools comprehensive instructional program.
  • PD designed with staff to ensure they are
    equipped to effectively teach and implement
    reform strategies.
  • Implement financial incentives, professional
    promotion and career growth opportunities, and
    flexible conditions to recruit, place, and retain
    staff.

31
School Closure Model
  • School closes and students placed in other
    schools that are higher achieving.
  • Schools where students placed should be within
    reasonable distance from closed school.
  • Charter school placement acceptable option.
  • Achievement data from new schools with no data
    allowed to have students enrolled.

32
List of Persistently Low Performing Schools in
SUSD
  • 2010 Taylor- Turnaround
  • 2010 Pittman-Dependent Charter
  • 2010 Roosevelt-Transformation
  • 2010 Nightingale- Dependent Charter
  • (1 year to plan)
  • 2011 Fremont-Transformation
  • 2011 Henry-Transformation
  • 2011 Harrison-Transformation

33
SUSDSIG Model
  • Extended Learning Time
  • 1.5 hours per week teacher collaboration time
  • All Students Provided Access to Enrichment Time
  • Summer School/Intercession Intervention
  • 4 hours a week increased access for all students
    to Core Curriculum
  • Science, Social Science, Technology, Engineering,
    Math

34
State Board of Education Monitoring
  • The SBE will set benchmarks that define how
    schools are to make progress.
  • Failure to perform will result in school having
    to present modification plan to SBE.
  • Failure to perform within three years will force
    school to choose from remaining three
    intervention models.

35
Stockton Unified School District
  • District Safety
  • SUSD supported Police Department
  • Superintendents priority to have safe schools
  • 15 sworn positions (12 officers, 1 sergeant, 1
    lieutenant, 1 chief)
  • Responded to over 5,600 cases 2010-11 school year
  • Issued over 2,200 truancy citations targeting
    chronic truants
  • Established community partnerships
  • School Resource Chaplains are in 15 of our K-8
    schools,
  • Plans to increase that number by 3 this year 2
    days a week, 4 hours per day
  • First day of school we will have a presence on
    our campuses from
  • School Resource Chaplains
  • Juvenile Probation
  • Peacekeepers (tentative)

36
Stockton Unified School District
2011-12 Adopted Budget The single largest fund of
the District is the general fund. About 84 of
the Districts revenue is accounted for in the
general fund. These funds are used for the
regular operation of the District. There are two
types of general funds unrestricted and
restricted. - The unrestricted can be used
for any educational and administrative
purpose. - The restricted funds, commonly
known as categorical, have legal
restrictions and can only fund specific programs
or projects during a given period. For
the 2011-12, the Districts projected general
fund revenue is 283.5 million. Of this total,
68.9, or 197.9 million, is unrestricted and
30.2, or 85.6 million, is restricted. American
Reinvestment Recovery Act (ARRA) Jobs saved by
FTE Certificated Positions 113.16
Classified Positions 44.49
157.65 Total FTE
37
Stockton Unified School District
  • SUSD offers medical, dental and vision
  • benefits for district employees.
  • Overall, the district pays in excess of 38
    million per year on benefits for employees.
  • The district pays approximately 742 up to 1,403
    in benefits for each employee per month depending
    on employee and bargaining group.
  • SUSD pays teachers approximately 59,000-103,000
    per year (182 work days), which also includes
    benefits. The average is 83,000.

38
Californias Spending Lags the Nation
California Rank California Rest of US
K-12 Spending per Student (2009-10) 44 8,826 ? 11,372
K-12 Spending as a Percentage of Personal Income (2008-09) 46 3.28 4.25
Number of K-12 Students Per Teacher (2009-10) 50 21.3 13.8
Number of K-12 Students Per Administrator (2007-08) 46 358 216
Number of K-12 Students Per Guidance Counselor (2007-08) 49 809 440
Number of K-12 Students Per Librarian (2007-08) 50 5038 809
2008 -09 and 2009-10 data are estimated. ? Stockton Unified School District spends 5,244.00 per student (K-12), which is 6,128.00 less than average in California. Note California Rank and Rest of US exclude the District of Columbia. Spending per student and number of students per teacher are based on Average Daily Attendance (ADA). Number of students per administrator, guidance counselor, and librarian are based on statewide enrollment. Source National Education Association, National Center for Education Statistics, and U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. 2008 -09 and 2009-10 data are estimated. ? Stockton Unified School District spends 5,244.00 per student (K-12), which is 6,128.00 less than average in California. Note California Rank and Rest of US exclude the District of Columbia. Spending per student and number of students per teacher are based on Average Daily Attendance (ADA). Number of students per administrator, guidance counselor, and librarian are based on statewide enrollment. Source National Education Association, National Center for Education Statistics, and U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. 2008 -09 and 2009-10 data are estimated. ? Stockton Unified School District spends 5,244.00 per student (K-12), which is 6,128.00 less than average in California. Note California Rank and Rest of US exclude the District of Columbia. Spending per student and number of students per teacher are based on Average Daily Attendance (ADA). Number of students per administrator, guidance counselor, and librarian are based on statewide enrollment. Source National Education Association, National Center for Education Statistics, and U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. 2008 -09 and 2009-10 data are estimated. ? Stockton Unified School District spends 5,244.00 per student (K-12), which is 6,128.00 less than average in California. Note California Rank and Rest of US exclude the District of Columbia. Spending per student and number of students per teacher are based on Average Daily Attendance (ADA). Number of students per administrator, guidance counselor, and librarian are based on statewide enrollment. Source National Education Association, National Center for Education Statistics, and U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis.
39
Breakdown of Unrestricted Expenses93 cents of
every dollar to salaries/benefits
NOTE Legal affairs represents all civil
defenders including BBK, KMTG, Atkinson Andels,
and McDonough Holland
40
Stockton Unified School District
To Balance the Budget for 2012-13 (192) Lay off
notices were sent out to Classified and
Certificated employees.
41
Stockton Unified School District
  • 2011-12
  • Stockton Unified School Districts goal is to
    keep the Stockton
  • community updated regarding the negotiations
    process between
  • Stockton Unified and the eight bargaining groups.
    Stockton Unified is
  • one of very few districts in the state that have
    eight bargaining groups to
  • negotiate with at the same time.
  • Eight Bargaining Units
  • - Stockton Teachers Association (STA)
  • - United Stockton Administrator (USA)
  • - CA School Employee Association (CSEA 318)
  • - CA School Employee Association (CSEA 821)
  • - OELU 3 Police
  • - Stockton Unified Supervisory Unit (SUSU)
  • - Stockton Pupil Personnel Association
    (SPPA)
  • - Calif. School Employee Association (CSEA 885
    Previously OE3
    transportation)

42
Funding Per ADA Actual vs. Statutory Level
43
Stockton Unified School District
  • Impact of State Revenue Limit Deferral
  • Example

Revenue Limit Apportionment
State R/L 145,000,000
State Deferral (56,000,000)
R/L Funding 89,000,000

TRANS
Borrowing 56,200,000
Cost of Issuance (200,000)
Net TRANs Proceeds 56,000,000

Impact of State R.L Deferral
State R/L 89,000,000
Net TRANS Proceeds 56,000,000
Total 145,000,000
44
Stockton Unified School District
  • Next Steps
  • Continue to put students FIRST
  • Expand 1852 Foundation
  • Establish District Alumni Association
  • Remain competitive
  • Create programs to serve all students
  • Be mindful of our non-traditional learners
  • Not all students are college bound
  • Focus on Career and Technical Education Programs
  • How can District and Business Community be more
    collaborative?

45
Stockton Unified School District
  • Stockton Unified School Districts primary
  • goal is to educate every student so that
  • he/she will become a productive citizen
  • in society. Our second goal is to save jobs
  • for employees and offer a respectable wage
  • and fringe benefits. Although the District
  • is facing financial difficulties, we will
  • continue to address the problem.

46
Stockton Unified School District
  • Questions??
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