First Amendment Project - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – First Amendment Project PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 5318bf-YjFlM



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

First Amendment Project

Description:

First Amendment Project Austin K. & Raphael W. Wieland Academy * or of the press or the right of the people peaceably to assemble and to petition the Government for a ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:59
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 42
Provided by: Goo7660
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: First Amendment Project


1
First Amendment Project
Austin K. Raphael W. Wieland Academy
2
The First Amendment Today
 
3
The First Amendment Today
The 45 words of the First Amendment haven't
changed since their adoption in 1791. Yet they
are called upon to help guide a society that is
radically different from the one in which the
Founding Fathers lived. In this century, the
First Amendment has been stretched and
reinterpreted as the government has become
involved in nearly all spheres of expressive
activity -- campaign financing, federal funding
of the arts, and regulation of mass media, to
name but a few. In the following slides I will
show you some of the things that have shaped the
first amendment into what it is today.
4
The Declaration of Independence
 
5
The Declaration of Independence
The United States Declaration of Independence is
a statement adopted by the Continental Congress
on July 4, 1776, which announced that the
thirteen American colonies then at war with Great
Britain were now independent states, and thus no
longer a part of the British Empire. Written
primarily by Thomas Jefferson, the Declaration is
a formal explanation of why Congress had voted on
July 2 to declare independence from Great
Britain, more than a year after the outbreak of
the American Revolutionary War. The birthday of
the United States of AmericaIndependence Dayis
celebrated on July 4, the day the wording of the
Declaration was approved by Congress.
6
The Constitution of the United States of America
 
7
The Constitution of the United States of America
The Constitution of the United States of America
is the supreme law of the United States. It is
the foundation and source of the legal authority
underlying the existence of the United States of
America and the federal government of the United
States. It provides the framework for the
organization of the United States government and
for the relationship of the federal government to
the states, to citizens, and to all people within
the United States.
8
The First Amendment
9
The First Amendment
The First Amendment (Amendment I) to the United
States Constitution is part of the Bill of
Rights. The amendment prohibits the making of any
law "respecting an establishment of religion",
impeding the free exercise of religion,
infringing on the freedom of speech, infringing
on the freedom of the press, interfering with the
right to peaceably assemble or prohibiting the
petitioning for a governmental redress of
grievances. Originally, the First Amendment only
applied to the Congress. However, in the 20th
century, the Supreme Court held that the Due
Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment
applies the First Amendment to each state,
including any local government
10
United States v. Cruikshank
United States v. Cruikshank, 92 U.S. 542 (1876)
was an important United States Supreme Court
decision in United States constitutional law, one
of the earliest to deal with the application of
the Bill of Rights to state governments following
the adoption of the Fourteenth Amendment.
11
Reynolds v. United States
  • Reynolds v. United States, 98 U.S. 145 (1878),
    was a Supreme Court of the United States case
    that held that religious duty was not a suitable
    defense to a criminal indictment. George Reynolds
    was a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of
    Latter-day Saints, charged with bigamy under the
    Morrill Anti-Bigamy Act after marrying Amelia
    Jane Schofield while still married to Mary Ann
    Tuddenham in Utah Territory.

12
The Sedition Act of 1918
  • The Sedition Act of 1918 was an Act of the United
    States Congress signed into law by President
    Woodrow Wilson on May 16, 1918. It forbade the
    use of "disloyal, profane, scurrilous, or abusive
    language" about the United States government, its
    flag, or its armed forces or that caused others
    to view the American government or its
    institutions with contempt. The act also allowed
    the Postmaster General to refuse to deliver mail
    that met those same standards for punishable
    speech or opinion. It applied only to times "when
    the United States is in war."It was repealed on
    December 13, 1920.

13
Schenck v. United States
  • Schenck v. United States, 249 U.S. 47 (1919), was
    a United States Supreme Court decision that
    upheld the Espionage Act of 1917 and concluded
    that a defendant did not have a First Amendment
    right to free speech against the draft during
    World War I. Charles Schenck was the Secretary of
    the Socialist party and was responsible for
    printing, distributing, and mailing 15,000
    leaflets to men eligible for the draft that
    advocated opposition to the draft. These leaflets
    contained statements such as "Do not submit to
    intimidation", "Assert your rights", "If you do
    not assert and support your rights, you are
    helping to deny or disparage rights which it is
    the solemn duty of all citizens and residents of
    the United States to retain." Ultimately, the
    case served as the founding of the "clear and
    present danger" rule.

14
Scopes Trial
  • The Scopes Trialformally known as Scopes vs. The
    State of Tennessee and informally known as the
    Scopes Monkey Trialwas an American legal case
    that tested the Butler Act which made it unlawful
    to teach any thoughts on the origin of man other
    than the Biblical account of mans origin. It was
    enacted as Tennessee Code Annotated Title 49
    (Education) Section 1922 . The law also prevented
    the teaching of the evolution of man from lower
    orders of animals in place of the Biblical
    account, in any Tennessee state-funded school and
    university.

15
West Virginia State Board of Education v. Barnette
  • West Virginia State Board of Education v.
    Barnette, 319 U.S. 624 (1943), is a decision by
    the Supreme Court of the United States that held
    that the Free Speech Clause of the First
    Amendment to the United States Constitution
    protected students from being forced to salute
    the American flag and say the Pledge of
    Allegiance in school.

16
New York Times Co. v. Sullivan
  • New York Times Co. v. Sullivan, 376 U.S. 254
    (1964),1 was a United States Supreme Court case
    which established the actual malice standard
    which has to be met before press reports about
    public officials or public figures can be
    considered to be defamation and libel and hence
    allowed free reporting of the civil rights
    campaigns in the southern United States. It is
    one of the key decisions supporting the freedom
    of the press. The actual malice standard requires
    that the plaintiff in a defamation or libel case
    prove that the publisher of the statement in
    question knew that the statement was false or
    acted in reckless disregard of its truth or
    falsity. Because of the extremely high burden of
    proof on the plaintiff, and the difficulty in
    proving essentially what is inside a person's
    head, such caseswhen they involve public
    figuresrarely prevail.

17
United States v. O'Brien
  • United States v. O'Brien, 391 U.S. 367 (1968),
    was a decision by the Supreme Court of the United
    States, which ruled that a criminal prohibition
    against burning a draft card did not violate the
    First Amendment's guarantee of free speech.
    Though the Court recognized that O'Brien's
    conduct was expressive as a protest against the
    Vietnam War, it considered the law justified by a
    significant government interest that was
    unrelated to the suppression of speech and was
    tailored towards that end

18
Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School
District
  • Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School
    District, 393 U.S. 503 (1969) was a decision by
    the United States Supreme Court that defined the
    constitutional rights of students in U.S. public
    schools. The Tinker test is still used by courts
    today to determine whether a school's
    disciplinary actions violate students' First
    Amendment rights

19
Texas v. Johnson
  • Texas v. Johnson, 491 U.S. 397 (1989), was a
    landmark decision by the Supreme Court of the
    United States that invalidated prohibitions on
    desecrating the American flag in force in 48 of
    the 50 states. Justice William Brennan wrote for
    a five-justice majority in holding that the
    defendant's act of flag burning was protected
    speech under the First Amendment to the United
    States Constitution. Johnson was represented by
    attorneys David D. Cole and William Kunstler.

20
Beussink v. Woodland R-IV School District
  • Beussink v. Woodland R-IV School district, 30 F.
    Supp. 2d 1175 (E.D. Mo. 1998) is an important
    case in United States law regarding the First
    Amendment and its application in public schools.
    It was decided in the United States District
    Court for the Eastern District of Missouri,
    Southeastern Division.

21
Morse v. Frederick
  • Morse v. Frederick, 551 U.S. 393 (2007) was a
    school speech case in which the United States
    Supreme Court held that the First Amendment does
    not prevent educators from suppressing student
    speech, at a school-supervised event, that is
    reasonably viewed as promoting illegal drug use.

22
United States v. Stevens
  • United States v. Stevens, 559 U.S. (2010) was a
    decision by the Supreme Court of the United
    States, which ruled that 18 U.S.C. 48, a
    federal statute criminalizing the commercial
    production, sale, or possession of depictions of
    cruelty to animals, was an unconstitutional
    abridgment of the First Amendment right to
    freedom of speech.

23
And now..
  • On to the First Amendment in Our Community.

24
Congress shall make no law respecting the
establishment of religion
25
(No Transcript)
26
(No Transcript)
27
(No Transcript)
28
(No Transcript)
29
or prohibiting the free exercise thereof
30
(No Transcript)
31
(No Transcript)
32
(No Transcript)
33
or abridging the freedom of speech
34
or of the press
35
(No Transcript)
36
(No Transcript)
37
(No Transcript)
38
(No Transcript)
39
or the right of the people peaceably to assemble
40
and to petition the Government for a redress of
grievances
41
Thanks for Watching!
About PowerShow.com