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Developing and assessing graduate attributes

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Title: Developing and assessing graduate attributes


1
Developing and assessing graduate attributes
Some perspectives from teaching and learning
  • Stuart Palmer
  • Institute of Teaching and Learning

2
The worlds most boring topic But sometimes the
important things arent that interesting
  • Stuart Palmer
  • Institute of Teaching and Learning

3
Graduate attributes
  • What are they?

4
Graduate attributes
  • Arising from the push in higher education for
  • quality assurance
  • accountability for outcomes and
  • capability of graduates
  • Specifying a list of qualities or capabilities
    that graduates will attain provides a benchmark
    against which the performance of a higher
    education institution can be measured

5
Graduate attributes
  • An inventory of desired / intended graduate
    attributes may be expressed in a range of forms
  • Currently, Deakin has structured its statement of
    graduate attributes using the categories of
  • knowledge and understanding, and
  • skills

6
Graduate attributes Accounting
  • Core Curriculum in Accounting and Business Areas
  • Financial accounting
  • Management accounting
  • Finance
  • Auditing and assurance
  • Australian commercial and corporations law
  • Australian taxation
  • Information systems design and development
  • Economics
  • Quantitative methods
  • Ethics across the curriculum Ethics is an
    important element in the development of new
    accounting and business professionals. It is
    expected that higher education providers will
    refer to ethical decision-making models,
    principles and values across the curriculum of
    accredited programs and, where possible,
    encourage debate on ethical issues based on
    practical cases.

Source http//commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/ImageAc
counting_cycle.gif
7
Graduate attributes - Accounting
  • Generic skills in the core curriculum
  • COGNITIVE SKILLS
  • Routine Skills
  • Particularly
  • report writing
  • computer literacy.
  • Analytic/Design Skills
  • Particularly the ability to
  • identify, find, evaluate, organise and manage
    information and evidence
  • initiate and conduct research
  • analyse, reason logically, conceptualise
    issues
  • solve problems and construct arguments
  • interpret data and reports
  • engage in ethical reasoning.
  • Appreciative Skills
  • Particularly the ability to
  • receive, evaluate and react to new ideas

BEHAVIOURAL SKILLS Personal Skills Particularly
the ability to be flexible in new/different
situations act strategically think and
act independently be focused on outcomes
tolerate ambiguity think creatively.
Interpersonal Skills Particularly the ability
to listen effectively present, discuss
and defend views transfer and receive
knowledge negotiate with people from
different backgrounds and with different value
systems understand group dynamics
collaborate with colleagues.
8
Graduate attributes
  • Problems / limitations?

9
Graduate attributes caveats
  • It is important to make the distinction between a
    program of study that has been designed to
    provide opportunities for students to be exposed
    to activities intended to develop, exercise and
    assess certain graduate attributes,
  • and those attributes that students have actually
    developed by the time they graduate from their
    program of study

10
Graduate attributes caveats
  • Having a list of graduate attributes published on
    the web or in a handbook does not automatically
    mean that
  • their existence and importance has been well
    communicated to students, staff and other
    stakeholders
  • students appreciate the importance and relevance
    of the various attributes in their studies and
  • exposure to the theory, practise and assessment
    of attributes has been coherently integrated
    across the program curriculum

11
Graduate attributes caveats
  • Graduate attributes, particularly generic
    attributes are not underpinned by a strong
    conceptual framework, and the efforts of
    universities to describe them, and university
    staff to teach them are characterised by a wide
    range of differing terminology, viewpoints and
    approaches
  • (see Simon Barrie University of Sydney)

12
Graduate attributes caveats
  • Despite a pervasive influence on recent policy
    developments in higher education, the evidence
    from the literature indicates that graduate
    attributes have generally been implemented only
    in limited ways, and viewed by many staff as a
    primarily managerially-driven curriculum reform
    agenda

13
Graduate attributes caveats
  • Another criticism of some graduate attributes is
    that they purport to imbue students with a range
    of knowledge, skills and attitudes that are not
    directly observable in the course of a program of
    study, or, cannot be determined to be in evidence
    until some future period in the students
    personal and/or professional life, leaving the
    university with a certification task that is
    logically and/or practically impossible

14
Henry David Thoreau (1817 1862)
  • We falsely attribute to men a determined
    character - putting together all their yesterdays
    - and averaging them - we presume we know them.

Source http//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ImageHenry_D
avid_Thoreau.jpg
15
Graduate attributes - caveats
  • Attributes relating to objective knowledge and
    specific observable skills are more readily
    visible and assessable, causing concern that the
    practicalities of what can be measured have led
    to graduate attribute lists emphasising skills
    and contributing to the vocationalisation of
    higher education

Source http//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/comm
ons/9/93/Boeing_787-9_View.jpg
Source http//commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/ImageTr
epanation_-_feldbuch-der_wundartzney.png
16
Eric Temple Bell (1883 1960)
  • Any impatient student of mathematics or science
    or engineering who is irked by having algebraic
    symbolism thrust upon him should try to get along
    without it for a week.

17
Even (some of) the critics concede
  • It is acknowledged that the observed problems do
    not necessarily represent a fundamental
    deficiency in the concept of graduate attributes
    itself
  • It is not unreasonable that a university, or
    other institution, should be able to explicitly
    define what its intended student learning
    outcomes are

18
Attributes of a Deakin graduate
  • All Deakin programs will encourage students to
    develop attitudes of intellectual curiosity and
    motivation for independent thinking, autonomous
    learning and reflective professional and personal
    practice, and a commitment to ethical and
    sustainable practices. Appropriate to its level
    of study and discipline composition, each program
    will be designed to ensure that students develop
    their knowledge and understanding as well as a
    range of generic skills. These are described
    below.

19
Attributes of a Deakin graduate
  • Knowledge and understanding
  • understanding of, and the ability to work with, a
    systematic body of knowledge, appropriate to the
    focus and level of the qualification based on the
    highest standards of scholarship and research
  • and where research is undertaken
  • ability to initiate and formulate viable and
    relevant research questions
  • contribution to new knowledge, or an original
    interpretation and application of existing
    knowledge
  • understanding of the social, economic and
    cultural impact and application of their
    research, and its academic relevance and value
  • understanding of the professional, social,
    economic and cultural contexts of the discipline
    and related fields
  • awareness of ethical issues, social
    responsibility and cultural diversity
  • understanding and appreciation of international
    perspectives in a global environment.

20
Attributes of a Deakin graduate
  • Skills
  • critical analysis, problem solving, and creative
    thinking
  • identifying, gathering, evaluating and using
    information
  • communicating effectively and appropriately in a
    range of contexts
  • developing, planning and managing independent
    work
  • working effectively as part of a team
  • effectively using information and communication
    technologies
  • applying knowledge learned in the program to new
    situations.

21
Employers of Deakin graduates
  • Attributes that were ranked as important by
    employers and for which they rated Deakin
    graduates highly included interpersonal skills,
    capacity to work in teams and work
    collaboratively, information and communication
    technology literacy, and an appreciation of the
    need to keep up to date in their field of
    education
  • Attributes which were ranked as important by
    employers and for which they rated Deakin
    graduates as not performing highly included oral
    communication skills, written communication
    skills and conflict management skills

22
2005 AUQA audit of Deakin
  • that Deakin University communicate to students
    more effectively the nature and aims of the
    Deakin Advantage the then current name of the
    suite of Deakins graduate attributes and assist
    them to document the discipline-specific and
    generic skills they are developing throughout
    their course.
  • (Australian Universities Quality Agency, 2005, p.
    19)

23
Engineering graduate attributes
  • Graduates from an accredited engineering
    program should have the following attributes
  • ability to apply knowledge of basic science and
    engineering fundamentals
  • ability to communicate effectively, not only with
    engineers but also with the community at large
  • in-depth technical competence in at least one
    engineering discipline
  • ability to undertake problem identification,
    formulation and solution
  • ability to utilise a systems approach to design
    and operational performance
  • ability to function effectively as an individual
    and in multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural
    teams, with the capacity to be a leader or
    manager as well as an effective team member
  • understanding of the social, cultural, global and
    environmental responsibilities of the
    professional engineer, and the need for
    sustainable development
  • understanding of the principles of sustainable
    design and development
  • understanding of professional and ethical
    responsibilities and commitment to them and
  • expectation of the need to undertake lifelong
    learning, and capacity to do so.

24
Grad. attributes other stakeholders
  • the institution
  • the profession / accrediting body
  • academic staff
  • current students
  • alumni
  • employers of graduates from the program
  • adjunct professors and other external academic
    advisors
  • program academic advisory boards
  • etc.

25
Interpreting graduate attributes
  • Many institutions identify a hierarchy of levels,
    with general graduate attributes at the top
  • At the next level, each attribute may have a
    range of elements that students must demonstrate,
    which are often program-specific
  • There may be additional levels of
    discipline-specific specification between this
    level and the complete range of individual
    student learning objectives for a program

26
Interpreting graduate attributes
  • Does anyone remember
  • The Deakin Advantage?

27
Learning from history
28
Interpreting graduate attributes
  • Understanding of, and the ability to work with, a
    systematic body of knowledge, appropriate to the
    focus and level of the qualification based on the
    highest standards of scholarship and research
  • Demonstrate up-to-date, systematic and coherent
    knowledge of a field of study.
  • Understand how knowledge is dynamically produced
    in the field of study and have a working
    knowledge of its characteristic methods of
    inquiry.
  • Be aware of the central debates within the field
    of study and recognise the historical contingency
    and transient nature of the knowledge base.
  • Demonstrate applications of theory to practice in
    real or simulated situations.

29
Interpreting graduate attributes
  • Identifying, gathering, evaluating and using
    information
  • Demonstrate information literacy skills including
    the ability to identify the types and sources of
    information required to address a problem find
    and retrieve information use the information
    effectively and appropriately and critically
    evaluate information resources.
  • Interpret and solve problems appropriate for a
    beginning professional within the discipline.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of typical problems met at
    initial levels of practice.
  • Read, interpret, synthesise, evaluate and
    communicate using the vocabularies, modes,
    genres, symbols and terms used within the field
    of study.
  • Use current technologies appropriate to entry
    level work in the field.

30
Graduate attributes in the curriculum
  • No single element of a program could hope to be
    responsible for more than a small part of the
    total graduate attribution formation
  • Each attribute will, typically, involve staged
    development across the program, increasing in
    depth and sophistication as the student
    progresses through their studies

31
The green fields approach
Source Jolly, L. (2001). Graduate Attributes
Fact Sheet 1.10 Implementing Graduate Attributes.
Brisbane, Australia University of Queensland,
The Value Added Career Start Program.
32
The green fields approach
Source Jolly, L. (2001). Graduate Attributes
Fact Sheet 1.10 Implementing Graduate Attributes.
Brisbane, Australia University of Queensland,
The Value Added Career Start Program.
33
The green fields approach
Source Jolly, L. (2001). Graduate Attributes
Fact Sheet 1.10 Implementing Graduate Attributes.
Brisbane, Australia University of Queensland,
The Value Added Career Start Program.
34
The brown fields approach
  • In practice, many programs already exist, and the
    opportunities to vary the program design may be
    comparatively limited, due to the pre-existing
    structures of prerequisites, unit streams,
    assessment types, etc.
  • An alternative approach is conduct an audit of
    how an existing program addresses the development
    and assessment of graduate attributes

35
A graduate attribute audit
36
Graduate attributes in the curriculum
  • Normally, we would expect graduate attributes to
    be developed in more that one place in a program
    curriculum, such that the students understanding
    of, and ability to use, an attribute grows in
    sophistication as their studies progress

37
Graduate attributes - UNE
  • Oral communication skills
  • Utilization of oral and aural skills within a two
    way process both between individuals and in
    groups, in order to inform, educate, persuade,
    and to influence behaviour. Oral communication
    skills should be demonstrated in a wide variety
    of contexts, and should display progressively
    increasing complexity and challenge, throughout
    the degree program.
  • Level and Description
  • 1. Students should be competent in giving a short
    oral presentation using appropriate structure and
    technologies in a range of classroom contexts.
  • 2. Debate students should competently present
    arguments, evidence and counter arguments in a
    mildly adversarial environment.
  • 3. Group facilitation (homogeneous group)
    Students should be able to utilize dialogue and
    active listening skills to facilitate a group
    through some form of problem solving, strategic
    planning, evaluation, learning etc. exercise.
  • 3. Group facilitation (heterogeneous group) as
    for 3 but with a higher level of conflict
    resolution, discourse, divergent and convergent
    thinking skills evidenced in communication, group
    management and information flow.

Source Chapman, L. (2004). Graduate Attributes
Resource Guide. University of New England.
http//www.une.edu.au/gamanual/resource_guide.pdf
38
Remember those guidelines?
39
Implementing graduate attributes
  • Effectively using information and communication
    technologies
  • Specify information technological literacy skills
    for each year of study and incorporate their
    development into learning programs.
  • Set minimum computer literacy requirements for
    commencing students, apply these in assessment
    and provide remedial opportunities for those who
    need them.
  • Ensure that each unit incorporates appropriate
    information technological literacy requirements.
  • Set assignments that require critical and
    creative use of electronic tools and information.
  • Make the use of technology for information and
    communication a routine expectation in learning
    activities and assessment practices.
  • Foster and support the use of different
    technologies in student presentations.
  • Encourage students to routinely critique the
    appropriateness and effectiveness of technologies.

40
Implementing graduate attributes
  • Developing, planning and managing independent
    work
  • Assign students to develop a career plan as an
    outcome of their course that incorporates the Job
    Ready Career Ready program (accessible on the
    Division of Student Life website).
  • As part of group assignments, introduce students
    to the concepts of leadership and ask them to
    assess their own and others contributions to
    outcomes.
  • Embed the development of time management skills,
    including meeting deadlines and punctuality, in
    assessed work and attendance expectations.
  • Work with the Division of Student Life to
    incorporate their relevant programs into
    assignments.
  • As part of work-related assignments and work
    placements, encourage reflection on
    organisational and personal management skills.
  • Create a variety of learning environments that
    require students to work in different ways in
    different contexts.
  • Assign the development of personal portfolios,
    either paper-based or electronic.

41
Assessment and graduate attributes
  • Designing a program curriculum to expose students
    to a range of learning activities intended to
    develop certain graduate attributes is a
    necessary step, but, in itself, does not ensure
    that students have actually developed the desired
    attributes
  • One element of such an assurance is including
    assessment tasks that seek to measure the
    students attainment of the desired attribute(s)

42
Assessment and graduate attributes
Source Jolly, L. (2001). Graduate Attributes
Fact Sheet 1.10 Implementing Graduate Attributes.
Brisbane, Australia University of Queensland,
The Value Added Career Start Program.
43
Assessment of graduate attributes
  • If we wish to close the loop between graduate
    attributes and assessment, we need to specify
    assessment criteria that provide an objective
    measure(s) of the level of student mastery of the
    set assessment task, as well as the level of
    mastery of the implied learning activity(s),
    learning objective(s) and graduate attributes
    that are embedded in the assessment task

44
Good assessment criteria (UQ)
  • They should be sufficient to enable an assessor
    to judge the presence or absence of the ability
    in a student
  • They should allow for levels of development in a
    students ability
  • They should be clear enough to enable a learner
    to imagine a performance that would demonstrate
    the ability
  • They should provide a picture of the ability in
    action
  • They should include qualitative dimensions of
    performance
  • They should not be directions, steps, tasks or
    formal requirements

Source Jolly, L. (2001). Graduate Attributes
Fact Sheet 1.10 Implementing Graduate Attributes.
Brisbane, Australia University of Queensland,
The Value Added Career Start Program.
45
Good assessment criteria (UOW)
  • specific to each task
  • clear and sufficiently detailed so as to provide
    guidance to students undertaking assessment task
  • transparent (i.e. stated in advance)
  • justifiable (i.e. linked to learning objectives)
    and achievable
  • appropriate to weightings
  • where appropriate, supported by a verbal or
    written statement about what constitutes the
    various levels of performance

Source University of Wollongong. (2007). B2.
Assessment Criteria -Learning Teaching _at_ UOW.
http//www.uow.edu.au/about/teaching/goodpractice/
UOW008512.html
46
Assessment of graduate attributes
Source University of Wollongong. (2007). B2.
Assessment Criteria -Learning Teaching _at_ UOW.
http//www.uow.edu.au/about/teaching/goodpractice/
UOW008512.html
47
Assessment of graduate attributes
Source Jolly, L. (2001). Graduate Attributes
Fact Sheet 1.10 Implementing Graduate Attributes.
Brisbane, Australia University of Queensland,
The Value Added Career Start Program.
48
Assessment other approaches
  • The use of detailed assessment criteria for
    individual assignments is an important part of
    establishing the incremental attainment of
    graduate attributes
  • If graduate attributes have been embedded into
    the program curriculum, then, taken together,
    satisfactory performance by a student in all of
    the formal assessment activities should represent
    satisfactory attainment of the required program
    graduate attributes

49
Assessment student portfolios
  • The benefits of portfolios are summarised as
  • they can contain many different types of
    evidence
  • they resolve many types of assessment problems in
    equity and moderation
  • they provide a richer picture of students
    learning and competency
  • students are actively involved in the building of
    the portfolio
  • they are well suited to authentic learning
    environments
  • they can be used in a wide range of contexts and
  • they provide a means for students to manage their
    own professional development

50
Assessment student portfolios
  • For the task of assessing outcomes of an entire
    program of study, a portfolio can act as an
    integrator, bringing together and assessing the
    whole program
  • including allowing students to demonstrate
    attainment of particular attributes that may not
    have been explicitly summatively assessed at any
    point during their prior studies

51
Assessment other approaches
  • Program graduates/alumni can be surveyed to seek
    their perceptions of the effectiveness of their
    studies in equipping them with the required
    attributes
  • Employers of graduates can be surveyed to seek
    their assessment of how well the graduate
    exhibits the required attributes

52
Assessment other approaches
  • Where student evaluation of teaching (SET)
    surveys include items relating to the development
    of graduate attributes, this data can provide a
    measure of the contribution of individual units
    to the development of program graduate attributes

53
Assessment other approaches
  • The Generic Skills scale of the CEQ contains the
    following question items
  • GS06 - The course helped me develop my ability to
    work as a team member
  • GS14 - The course sharpened my analytic skills
  • GS23 - The course developed my problem solving
    skills
  • GS32 - The course improved my skills in written
    communication
  • GS42 - As a result of my course, I feel confident
    about tackling unfamiliar problems
  • GS43 - The course helped me to develop the
    ability to plan my own work

54
www.deakin.edu.au/itl/pd/tl-modules/curriculum
55
Case study - An online student portfolio for
engagement with graduate attributes
56
Engineering Education
  • Internationally, engineering education
    accrediting bodies have moved toward
    outcomes-based assessment of graduate competency
  • This is typically realised in the form of a list
    of graduate attributes that students should
    exhibit by the completion of their studies

57
Graduate attributes Deakin Uni
  • Knowledge and understanding
  • understanding of, and the ability to work with,
    a systematic body of knowledge, appropriate to
    the focus and level of the qualification based on
    the highest standards of scholarship and research
  • and where research is undertaken
  • ability to initiate and formulate viable and
    relevant research questions
  • contribution to new knowledge, or an original
    interpretation and application of existing
    knowledge
  • understanding of the social, economic and
    cultural impact and application of their
    research, and its academic relevance and value
  • understanding of the professional, social,
    economic and cultural contexts of the discipline
    and related fields
  • awareness of ethical issues, social
    responsibility and cultural diversity
  • understanding and appreciation of international
    perspectives in a global environment.
  • Skills
  • critical analysis, problem solving, and
    creative thinking
  • Identifying, gathering, evaluating and using
    information
  • communicating effectively and appropriately in
    a range of contexts
  • developing, planning and managing independent
    work
  • working effectively as part of a team
  • effectively using information and communication
    technologies
  • applying knowledge learned in the program to
    new situations.

58
Graduate attributes - Eng Aust
59
Eng Aust - Competency standard
60
Graduate attributes a caveat
  • It is important to make the distinction between
    processes which ensure that a program will
    contain opportunities for student to learn and
    practice desired attributes (certification of the
    program), and, processes which seek to certify
    actual student attainment of graduate attributes

61
Engineering online portfolio trial aims
  1. Translate both Deakins and Engineers Australias
    graduate attributes into discipline-contextualised
    attributes for engineering
  2. Develop an on-line student portfolio system based
    on WebCT Vista
  3. Using a sub-set of these graduate attributes,
    embed the use of the on-line student portfolio
    into the assessment of that unit
  4. Conduct a trial and evaluation of the portfolio

62
2005 AUQA audit of Deakin
  • that Deakin University communicate to students
    more effectively the nature and aims of the
    Deakin Advantage the then current name of the
    suite of Deakins graduate attributes and assist
    them to document the discipline-specific and
    generic skills they are developing throughout
    their course.
  • (Australian Universities Quality Agency, 2005, p.
    19)

63
Graduate attributes selected
  1. Proficiency in engineering design
  2. Ability to communicate effectively, with the
    engineering team and with the community at large
  3. Manage own time and processes effectively,
    prioritising competing demands to achieve
    personal and team goals and objectives
  4. Fluency in current computer-based word-processing
    and graphics packages
  5. Capacity for creativity and innovation

64
The assessable task
  1. Evidence Tangible evidence, in an electronic
    form that demonstrates attainment of the
    specified attribute
  2. Reflection (at least) 200 words that
    demonstrates understanding of the importance and
    relevance of the attribute

65
A typical portfolio submission
For an engineer, the fluency in current computer
based word processing is vital for documentation
and also good in graphic design helps them to
present the idea to the audience both technical
and non technical in a clearer view. For me, I
have a fluency in word based processing such as
Microsoft Words (Shown in Figure 2) for
documentation, Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (shown
in Figure 1) and also Microsoft Power Point
Presentation (Shown in Figure 3). All of the
stated above enhance me to make my oral
presentation to my supervisor and fellow students
(MS PowerPoint), present a graph figure to prove
a theory found (MS Excel) and documentation of my
thesis during undergraduate studies (MS
Words). As we all know pictures and graphics
speaks a thousand words. Therefore for an
engineer to present an idea, all they need to do
is present them in graphic form. There are a few
graphic software that Ive learned and able to
deliver some model by using them. They are namely
3D Drawing using Google Sketch Up (Figure 4), PCB
Layout and schematic design using Protel 99
(Figure 5), Circuit Simulation using MultiSIM
7(Figure 6), and simulation of source code using
8051IDE Simulator (Figure 7). The 3D-Drawing
using Google Sketch Up enhances me to present my
idea in a 3D view where I present my idea of my
final year project in dept to my audiences. The
layout of my project is drawn by this software as
referred to Figure 4. Ive used the Protel 99
software to model my PCB Layout and schematic.
Figure 5 shows the PCB Layout of my circuit name
Control Panel. In this software all I need is to
draw the schematic and the entire program can
route the PCB layout for me. This will then ease
my workload and result obtained is up to the
requirement. MultiSIM 7 is used to simulate my
result of the stepper motor as shown in Figure 6.
From this simulation I can verify my results
obtained from the experiment with the result
obtain from the simulation. Circuit needs to be
drawn in order to simulate the result using
MultiSIM 7. 8051 IDE Simulator is used to
simulate the Pentium Assembly Language and if the
error in the source code that Ive written the
appropriate error will be flagged in that
particular register. Ive used this simulator to
track the error during designing the software for
the 8051 microcontroller as shown in Figure 7.
66
Start of semester details
Number of valid responses Number of valid responses Number of valid responses Total class enrolment Total class enrolment Total class enrolment Response rate Response rate Response rate
48 48 48 79 79 79 60.8 percent 60.8 percent 60.8 percent
Mean age Mean age Standard deviation Standard deviation Standard deviation Age range Age range Age range Median Age
26.3 years 26.3 years 7.94 years 7.94 years 7.94 years 20 to 50 years 20 to 50 years 20 to 50 years 23 years
Characteristic Respondent sample Respondent sample Respondent sample Class population Class population Class population Significance test Significance test
Female 6.4 percent 6.4 percent 6.4 percent 5.1 percent 5.1 percent 5.1 percent Small sample Binomial Small sample Binomial
Male 93.6 percent 93.6 percent 93.6 percent 94.9 percent 94.9 percent 94.9 percent p gt 0.43 p gt 0.43
On-campus 68.8 percent 68.8 percent 68.8 percent 65.8 percent 65.8 percent 65.8 percent Chi square test Chi square test
Off-campus 31.2 percent 31.2 percent 31.2 percent 34.2 percent 34.2 percent 34.2 percent ?21 0.12, p gt 0.73 ?21 0.12, p gt 0.73
67
Previously used hardcopy portfolio?
1. Previously used hardcopy portfolio? 2.
Previously used electronic portfolio? 3. Aware of
the concept of graduate attributes? 4. Aware that
Engineers Australia has a list of graduate
attributes?
5. Aware that Deakin University has a list of
graduate attributes? 6. Link between study
assessment, and development of GAs? 7. Understand
the purpose of a student professional portfolio?
68
Previously used electronic portfolio?
1. Previously used hardcopy portfolio? 2.
Previously used electronic portfolio? 3. Aware of
the concept of graduate attributes? 4. Aware that
Engineers Australia has a list of graduate
attributes?
5. Aware that Deakin University has a list of
graduate attributes? 6. Link between study
assessment, and development of GAs? 7. Understand
the purpose of a student professional portfolio?
69
Aware of graduate attributes?
1. Previously used hardcopy portfolio? 2.
Previously used electronic portfolio? 3. Aware of
the concept of graduate attributes? 4. Aware that
Engineers Australia has a list of graduate
attributes?
5. Aware that Deakin University has a list of
graduate attributes? 6. Link between study
assessment, and development of GAs? 7. Understand
the purpose of a student professional portfolio?
70
Engineers Aust. has graduate attributes?
1. Previously used hardcopy portfolio? 2.
Previously used electronic portfolio? 3. Aware of
the concept of graduate attributes? 4. Aware that
Engineers Australia has a list of graduate
attributes?
5. Aware that Deakin University has a list of
graduate attributes? 6. Link between study
assessment, and development of GAs? 7. Understand
the purpose of a student professional portfolio?
71
Deakin has graduate attributes?
1. Previously used hardcopy portfolio? 2.
Previously used electronic portfolio? 3. Aware of
the concept of graduate attributes? 4. Aware that
Engineers Australia has a list of graduate
attributes?
5. Aware that Deakin University has a list of
graduate attributes? 6. Link between study
assessment, and development of GAs? 7. Understand
the purpose of a student professional portfolio?
72
Study, assessment graduate attributes?
1. Previously used hardcopy portfolio? 2.
Previously used electronic portfolio? 3. Aware of
the concept of graduate attributes? 4. Aware that
Engineers Australia has a list of graduate
attributes?
5. Aware that Deakin University has a list of
graduate attributes? 6. Link between study
assessment, and development of GAs? 7. Understand
the purpose of a student professional portfolio?
73
Understand purpose of student portfolio?
1. Previously used hardcopy portfolio? 2.
Previously used electronic portfolio? 3. Aware of
the concept of graduate attributes? 4. Aware that
Engineers Australia has a list of graduate
attributes?
5. Aware that Deakin University has a list of
graduate attributes? 6. Link between study
assessment, and development of GAs? 7. Understand
the purpose of a student professional portfolio?
74
End of semester details
Number of valid responses Number of valid responses Number of valid responses Total class enrolment Total class enrolment Total class enrolment Response rate Response rate Response rate
50 50 50 70 70 70 71.4 percent 71.4 percent 71.4 percent
Mean age Mean age Standard deviation Standard deviation Standard deviation Age range Age range Age range Median Age
25.3 years 25.3 years 7.24 years 7.24 years 7.24 years 20 to 50 years 20 to 50 years 20 to 50 years 22 years
Characteristic Respondent sample Respondent sample Respondent sample Class population Class population Class population Significance test Significance test
Female 6.0 percent 6.0 percent 6.0 percent 5.7 percent 5.7 percent 5.7 percent Small sample Binomial Small sample Binomial
Male 94.0 percent 94.0 percent 94.0 percent 94.3 percent 94.3 percent 94.3 percent p gt 0.54 p gt 0.54
On-campus 78.0 percent 78.0 percent 78.0 percent 72.9 percent 72.9 percent 72.9 percent Chi square test Chi square test
Off-campus 22.0 percent 22.0 percent 22.0 percent 27.1 percent 27.1 percent 27.1 percent ?21 0.41, p gt 0.52 ?21 0.41, p gt 0.52
75
End of semester
1. Previously used hardcopy portfolio? 2.
Previously used electronic portfolio? 3. Aware of
the concept of graduate attributes? 4. Aware that
Engineers Australia has a list of graduate
attributes?
5. Aware that Deakin University has a list of
graduate attributes? 6. Link between study
assessment, and development of GAs? 7. Understand
the purpose of a student professional portfolio?
76
Aware of graduate attributes?
1. Previously used hardcopy portfolio? 2.
Previously used electronic portfolio? 3. Aware of
the concept of graduate attributes? 4. Aware that
Engineers Australia has a list of graduate
attributes?
5. Aware that Deakin University has a list of
graduate attributes? 6. Link between study
assessment, and development of GAs? 7. Understand
the purpose of a student professional portfolio?
77
Engineers Aust. has graduate attributes?
1. Previously used hardcopy portfolio? 2.
Previously used electronic portfolio? 3. Aware of
the concept of graduate attributes? 4. Aware that
Engineers Australia has a list of graduate
attributes?
5. Aware that Deakin University has a list of
graduate attributes? 6. Link between study
assessment, and development of GAs? 7. Understand
the purpose of a student professional portfolio?
78
Deakin has graduate attributes?
1. Previously used hardcopy portfolio? 2.
Previously used electronic portfolio? 3. Aware of
the concept of graduate attributes? 4. Aware that
Engineers Australia has a list of graduate
attributes?
5. Aware that Deakin University has a list of
graduate attributes? 6. Link between study
assessment, and development of GAs? 7. Understand
the purpose of a student professional portfolio?
79
Study, assessment graduate attributes?
1. Previously used hardcopy portfolio? 2.
Previously used electronic portfolio? 3. Aware of
the concept of graduate attributes? 4. Aware that
Engineers Australia has a list of graduate
attributes?
5. Aware that Deakin University has a list of
graduate attributes? 6. Link between study
assessment, and development of GAs? 7. Understand
the purpose of a student professional portfolio?
80
Understand purpose of student portfolio?
1. Previously used hardcopy portfolio? 2.
Previously used electronic portfolio? 3. Aware of
the concept of graduate attributes? 4. Aware that
Engineers Australia has a list of graduate
attributes?
5. Aware that Deakin University has a list of
graduate attributes? 6. Link between study
assessment, and development of GAs? 7. Understand
the purpose of a student professional portfolio?
81
A couple of student comments
  • Ithought the portfolio was an excellent idea,
    as I hadnt realised how much I have achieved
    until I did it. It will help me immensely in
    putting together a resume.
  • Made me feel like I am working towards
    something, and havent been wasting time.

82
  • Thank you for your time
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