Warehouse Assignment - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


Title: Warehouse Assignment


1
Warehouse Assignment
  • Toby Labuc 201191189
  • Joseph McCann 300175876
  • Daniel Odwyer 300176765
  • Gareth Bellchambers 300170954

2
Construction Overview
  • The BDC have purchased a block of land at, lot 4,
    Baines Crescent, in the industrial area of
    Torquay. (Zone 3)
  • The site is not currently surrounded by other
    structures. Therefore setbacks are not required
    for any other reason than achieving an approved
    fire rating.

3
Design Features
  • In order to achieve a professional, and appealing
    shop front, we have located the warehouse behind
    the showroom, and concealed any transport
    vehicles.
  • In order to keep the warehouse as multi
    functional as possible, we have decided to keep
    the area column free, having steel roofing beams
    spanning the whole distance.
  • One of our main Objectives was to achieve a free
    flowing, and efficient working area for the
    warehouse. And a modern showroom, that will
    provide the company with an aesthetically
    pleasing shopfront.

4
Site Layout
  • The showroom has been positioned towards the
    front of the site.
  • The warehouse located toward the back.
  • Next to the showroom is a large customer/ staff
    car park.
  • There is a large area of the land devoted to
    providing trucks with adequate turning space.
  • The Warehouse and showroom have been designed and
    built as separate structures.

2
4
1
3
5
30m
54m
6m
6m
20m
30m
6m
6
Warehouse layout
Security Office
5m
Roller Doors
Offices
Lunch Room
Toilets
30m
54m
7
Excavation of site
  • As you can see from the site layout, the
    geographical characteristics of our site, show a
    slope running from the back to the front. As our
    warehouse cant have any internal steps (due to
    forklift access) we need to level the affected
    area.
  • However, as the Showroom is a separate structure,
    it can be levelled to a different origin point.

Warehouse
Showroom
8
Excavation of Site
  • Not only does the immediate area under the
    warehouse need to be levelled, the surrounding
    areas also need to be excavated to the same
    depth.
  • This is to allow fire exit doors to be opened
    outwards, and for any transport vehicles to be
    able to access the roller doors with out any
    fuss.
  • Excavating the site is a costly exercise, yet for
    the smooth running of the company, we see it as
    necessary procedure.

9
Footings and Foundations
  • Soil classification for our site is Class M
  • For this we have chosen to use a standard raft
    slab, yet will provide extra strength and
    stability through the addition of pad footings
    under all necessary columns.

10
Slab and Footings
  • First, the site is excavated to the required
    depths for pad footings, and raft slab. In
    accordance with the engineers specifications, the
    pad footings need to be embedded into the clay
    foundations to a min of 200mm.
  • Steel reinforcement is then placed in position
    for the pad footings. Keeping a 45mm encasing of
    cement around all members, top and bottom. This
    ensures that no water or oxygen can come in
    contact with the steel causing corrosion.

11
Slab and Footings
  • Once the pad footings have been poured and set,
    the reinforcement for the raft slab is
    positioned.
  • This then allows for the raft slab to be poured.
    Plastic chairs are used to position the steel
    mesh at the correct height, keeping a 45mm
    covering of concrete around all steel members.

12
Slab and Footings
  • As our slab covers a large area, noticeable
    differential movement will occur. To avoid the
    movement from creating cracks in our rigid slab,
    we will space 50mm deep saw cuts every 12 13
    feet apart, acting as expansion Joints.
  • These saw cuts will preferably cut through the
    top layer of longitudinal steel mesh, thus
    allowing for the slab to open up, and relieve any
    tensile stress.
  • An appropriate sealant shall be used to fill in
    these cuts, keeping the steel reinforcement
    protected from corrosion, yet giving the
    flexibility required.
  • These cuts are to be made between 12 to 24 hours
    after the slab has been poured, in order to
    prevent any immediate cracking.

13
Warehouse Primary Structure
  • We have chosen to use steel Portal Frames for our
    primary structure.
  • Definition. A continuous rigid frame with a
    restrained joint between the column and beam.
    (Jeremy Ham, lecture notes, portal frames.)

14
Advantages of Portal Frames
  • Due to the material used (steel) and the design
    of each Portal Frame, they are able to span large
    distances (from 15 45m) without the use of
    intermittent columns.
  • The pre-fabricated members of the frame have been
    designed in a manner that allows for simple, and
    quick erection. For example, there are small
    brackets placed on the columns, at the required
    height, which allow for the roofing beams to rest
    in place while the trades persons fix them to
    each other.

15
Advantages of Portal Frames
  • As there is only a couple of welders, steel
    workers, and a crane driver necessary in the
    construction of these frames, only a limited
    amount of trades are present.
  • All of these factors also dramatically reduce the
    costs associated with normal primary structures.

16
Alternative Framing
  • An alternative framing system to the portal frame
    is precast concrete panels.
  • This framing system uses precast concrete panels
    instead of stanchions/ columns. The load from the
    roof is passed on down through the concrete
    panels.
  • The rafters, bracing and strut ties transfer the
    roof load on to the concrete panels. The rafter
    are connected by a steel plate that is bolted
    into the panel.
  • The benefits of using this system is the precast
    concrete panels give the building a good finish
    for the are factory made so there are no
    imperfections, therefore no additional wall
    cladding is required, saving money.
  • However there are large expenses involved in the
    transportation of the precast concrete panels.
    Also the walls need to be erected erected using
    cranes and other heavy machinery, which can make
    them quite costly in comparison to portal frame
    and steel sheet cladding. In addition there are
    high OHS risk involved in using concrete panels
    which also adds to the cost of this type of
    framing system.

Source- Ham, J.J., Lecture notes, Tilt up
PowerPoint presentation
Source-http//www.workcover.vic.gov.au/dir090/vwa/
home.nsf/pages/so_construction_attach2/File/Panel
_Collapse.pdf
17
Glossary for Steel Members
  • When we describe a universal beam or an universal
    column, we use the format Depth, Name of
    Member, and weight per lineal meter. E.g.
    410UB54
  • For all primary structures, we will use I
    beams. And for all secondary structures we will
    use C sections
  • 6CFW this refers to the welding method,
    connecting the web to the flange. E.g. 6mm
    thick, continuous fillet weld.
  • BMT bare metal thickness

18
Steel Members - Warehouse
  • 360 UB 51. These members have been chosen as the
    minimum required, taking into account for the
    dead and live loads for the area. This was done
    to achieve an acceptable cost effectiveness.
  • 100 x 16mm thick sheer stiffener plates top and
    bottom. But welded end. 6CFW to web on both
    sides of column.
  • 16mm thick base plate. 6CFW.
  • Pre drilled holes for bolting
  • Brace to support roofing beams to sit on.

19
Steel Members - Warehouse
  • 410 UB 54. These members have been chosen as the
    minimum required, taking into account for the
    dead and live loads for the area. This was done
    to achieve an acceptable cost effectiveness.
  • Beams at a 6º roof pitch
  • 200 x 25mm thick end plate, with butt welded
    flanges.
  • 200 x 32mm thick end plate, with butt welded
    flanges.

20
Connections - Warehouse
  • Ridge Joint 4 x M20 8.8/TF bolts at the top and
    bottom of the flange plates.
  • This is referred to as a flexible connection.
  • A flexible connection gives simple support with
    reduced costs, (doesn't include need for bracing)
    and as it is bolted on site, there is less
    welding.

21
Connections - Warehouse
  • Knee Joint 4 x M30 8.8/TF bolts at the top and
    bottom of the flange plates, and butt welded to
    form a rigid connection.
  • This combines beam and column into one structural
    entity
  • This gives a higher restraint to beam rotation.
  • However is more complex to fabricate, is more
    difficult to erect with high tolerance, and is
    more costly.

22
Connections - Warehouse
  • 4 x M16 caged Bolts
  • Embedded 300mm deep into footing.
  • Minimum of 25mm non shrink grout under base
    plate.
  • This is called a rigid base plate connection.

23
Roof Bracing - Warehouse
  • 20 mm diameter rods for cross bracing, slotted
    through hole in web. With universal wind bracing
    bracket used to tension rods.
  • Hook roof bracing up to underside of every second
    purlin with R6 diameter hooks prior to tensioning.

24
Wall Bracing - Warehouse
  • 20mm diameter rods for cross bracing.
  • Fixed to columns via 90 x 90 x 10mm angles

25
Secondary Structure - Warehouse
  • The secondary structure is in place to provide
    extra fixing points for any cladding used. This
    allows for a reduction in the size any cladding,
    as it does not have to span great distances.
  • The secondary structure will be fixed to the
    primary structure by bolting the webs to
    pre-welded brackets.

9000mm
2000
26
Secondary Structure - Warehouse
  • Due to different wind loads on different areas of
    the structure, we need to provide extra purlins
    and gurts in order for the cladding to have
    adequate strength.
  • For the Walls, we are using Z sections, 254mm
    deep, 79mm broad flange, 74mm narrow flange, 19mm
    lip depth, and 1.9mm BMT. This has a section
    mass of 6.39kg/m
  • These will be spaced at 2900mm top and bottom of
    the wall (end span), and at 3000mm internal span.

27
Secondary Structure - Warehouse
  • For the Roof, we will be using C sections,
    254mm deep, 76mm flange, 19mm lip depth, and
    1.9mm BMT. This has a section mass of 6.39kg/m
  • These will have an end span 2000mm, and an
    internal span of 2500mm.

28
Wall Cladding
  • LYSAGHT TRIMWALL Rib-and-pan walling (steel
    sheeting)
  • This wall cladding was chosen because it ties in
    with the roof cladding. Since it is manufactured
    by the same company the finishes can be
    consistent throughout.
  • Wall cladding made from ZINCALUME steel (meaning
    it is coated in aluminium/zinc alloy) this is in
    compliance with AS1397-G550-AZ150. It is this
    that gives it an excellent corrosion resistance.
    This is an important factor in terms of cladding
    since the warehouse is located in a costal area.
  • In addition this cladding is lightweight and
    versatile
  • Like the roof cladding, the finish of wall steel
    sheeting will be acrylic painted.

29
Wall Cladding
  • Span
  • End Span
  • 2900
  • Internal Span
  • 3000
  • The maximum recommended support spacings are
    based on testing in accordance with AS1562.1-1992
    and AS4040.2-1992 (http//www.bluescopesteel.com.a
    u).
  • The wind pressure capacity is determined in
    accordance with the engineers specifications.

Source- http//www.bluescopesteel.com.au
30
Wall Cladding
  • LYSAGHT TRIMWALL Rib-and-pan walling (steel
    sheeting) is fastened by screws on every grit
    with weatherlok washers beneath head of the
    screw. Predrilled holes in sheeting should be 3mm
    larger than screw shank.

Source- http//www.bluescopesteel.com.au
31
Wall Cladding
  • Alternative to the wall cladding system being
    used
  • Precast concrete panels combined with a steel
    sheet cladding.
  • The system was turned down because it additional
    materials are required and there are large
    transport expenses when transporting precast
    concrete adding to the cost of the construction.
    The benefits of using this system is that the
    wall cladding cannot be damaged by the forklift,
    however this can easily be combated by the
    location of the whare house shelving.
  • Another alternative is just using precast
    concrete or tilt up panels this option was turned
    down for it did not tie in with the roof cladding
    also since the panels constructed on site there
    is a greater chance of imperfections. In addition
    there is greater OHS when dealing with tilt-up
    panels.

Source- http//www.thomasarmstrong.com.uk
Sourcehttp//www.workcover.vic.gov.au/vwa/home.ns
f/pages/so_construction_attach2/File/Panel_Collap
se.pdf
32
Roofing Cladding - Warehouse
  • The roof cladding used on this warehouse is
    LYSAGHT LONGLINE 305 flat-pan, concealed-fixed
    roofing which is steel with a ZINCALUM coating.
  • This coating is made form aluminium/zinc
    alloy-coated steel.
  • This is manufactured by Blue Scope Steel.

Source- http//www.bluescopesteel.com.au
33
Roofing Cladding - Warehouse
  • Spans
  • - Internal Span
  • - with a maximum spacing of 2500mm
  • -End Span
  • - with a maximum spacing of 2000mm
  • The maximum recommended roof support spacing are
    based on testing in accordance with
    AS1562.1-1992,AS4040.1-1992 and AS4040.1-1992
    (http//www.bluescopesteel.com.au)
  • This span takes into consideration both
    resistance to wind pressure and light foot
    traffic (loads due to incidental maintenance).
    As there is a greater amount of pressure on the
    edge of the warehouse, shorter spans are required
    in those areas to provide extra strength.

34
Roofing Cladding - Warehouse
  • The base metal thickness (BMT) of this roof
    cladding is 0.70mm (http//www.bluescopesteel.com.
    au)
  • It has a 300MPa minimum yield stress and 150g/m²
    minimum coating mass this is in compliance with
    AS 1397-2001 G300, AZ150 (http//www.bluescopestee
    l.com.au).

35
Roofing Cladding - Warehouse
  • The finish/ coating on this cladding is acrylic,
    this is because of the availability of acrylic
    paint, good corrosion resistance, good colour
    performance and gloss retention, and has good
    abrasion resistance. The cladding will be
    pre-painted.
  • The cladding will have ridge capping running the
    ridge of the roof. There will also be flashing
    on the ends of the warehouse.
  • The cladding will be fastened using screws. They
    shall be fastened as per metal deck roofing, plus
    weatherlok washers beneath head of the roof
    fastener to stop water leakage. Nominally longer
    than standard fasteners and holes in sheeting
    should be predrilled 3mm larger than screw shanks
    (http//www.bluescopesteel.com.au)

36
Roofing Cladding - Warehouse
  • It is a strong and durable product, and its
    aluminium and zinc coating give it a corrosion
    resistance that is vital for the costal
    environment where this warehouse is located.
  • It is also traditionally used in industrial
    buildings and applications.
  • There is a corrosion warranty of 25 years on this
    material.
  • As long as this steel sheeting is well maintained
    and the coat in accordance with the engineers
    specifications, a reasonable life span can be
    ensured thus keeping coast down.
  • Also the cladding combines well with most other
    building materials and treatments.

37
Roofing Cladding - Warehouse
  • Some alternative roof cladding systems are
  • LYSAGHT INTREGRITY 820, this has all most of
    benefits of LYSAGHT INTREGRITY 305, however
    LYSAGHT INTREGRITY 820 can not be used on roof
    that have a pitch greater than 1 degree.
  • Another alternative was Aluminium Roofing was
    also neglected this was due to the cost of using
    this product. The warehouse has quite a large
    roof area and also if this type f cladding was
    use on the walls as well that would come at a
    great expense.

38
Guttering - Warehouse
  • The guttering used for this warehouse will be
    D/ Quad gutter.
  • This type of guttering was chosen because it is
    manufactured by blue scope steel like the roof
    cladding. This means the gutters are compatible
    with steel roofing and come in a full range of
    matching colors.
  • This gutter slops at a minimum fall of 1 in every
    500, therefore over the length of building the
    guttering will need to drop 10.8 cm.

39
Guttering - Warehouse
  • A 65 mm
  • B 90 mm
  • C 115 mm
  • Source-http//www.bluescopesteel.com.au

40
Guttering - Warehouse
  • Other types of guttering were not considered
    because we wanted to maintain the same materials
    and colors in the roof and gutter.
  • Also seeing as both the roof cladding and the
    guttering came from the same manufacturer (blue
    scope steel) they were transported together
    reducing the costs. This also meant only one
    invoice.
  • In the long run is saved a lot of time and money.

41
Guttering Down Pipes
  • The down pipes that are being using are also from
    Blue Scope Steel.
  • We are using this type down piping for the same
    reason as the guttering, it will tie in with the
    building, the required colours are available and
    it will make the construction easier using the
    same manufacturer for the roof cladding,
    guttering and down pipes.

42
Guttering Down Pipes
  • The warehouse will have rectangular down pipes.
  • These will be made from aluminium, this is
    because it has excellent corrosion resistance.
    The finishes (eg acrylic paint) will still be
    consistent throughout the roofing.
  • The sizing of these pipes
  • Dimensions-150 x 150 mm
  • BMT (mm)- 0.55
  • Spacing (m)- 18
  • Finish- Acrylic Paint

43
Warehouse Offices/ Lunch Room and Toilets
construction process
  • The wall frames ware the first to go up. The
    studs, top plate and bottom plate are nailed
    together creating the basic wall shape. It is in
    this process that doors and windows cutout. Then
    noggins a placed in between the 600c/c spaced
    studs. This is to straighten up (make them
    square) the walls.
  • Once all this is done the walls are erected,
    using a ramset gun to nail the bottom plate into
    the slab. Then when they are in place the
    plasterboards can start being fixed on. Before
    this process is finished the necessary services
    must be installed.
  • Once the services are installed the insulation
    can be put in the walls. When this is all
    completed the rest of the plasterboard can be
    screwed on to the wall.
  • The connections between each plasterboard sheet
    will then be plastered over, this is to make sure
    the finish will look nice.
  • Lastly the wall will have a normal painted
    finish.

44
Warehouse Offices/ Lunch Room and Toilets
  • The offices, lunch room and toilets are all
    constructed by traditional timber framing
    techniques. Although the survives required for
    each room may differ.
  • For the comfort of the employer (of the client)
    and to keep the warehouse versatile the offices,
    lunch rooms and toilets will be insulated with
    batts of R-Value 2.0. This is for both thermal
    and acoustic befits.
  • The wall height will be 2700mm above the floor.
    The suspended ceiling will sit just below the
    height of the walls.
  • The materials required are
  • Studs 70mm by 45mm (note wall are non load
    bearing)
  • Noggins 70mm by 45
  • Top and Bottom Plates 70mm by 45mm
  • Plasterboard 13mm
  • Insulation- Pink Bats

45
Warehouse Offices/ Lunch Room and Toilets
  • Suspended Ceiling
  • The suspended Ceiling in hung from the exposed
    beam in the roof. Small metal clips are screwed
    into the beam. From these clips thin steel rods
    hang down to just below the wall height. Attached
    to the end of these rods are another style of
    small clips. Which then are attached to a series
    of metal clips.
  • The clips are attached to the runners (aluminium
    supports for the ceiling tiles). These clips are
    factory designed to attach to the runners
    ensuring maximum support in the fixings.
  • Around the walls right angle shaped runners are
    attached to the wall about 5cm below the top of
    the wall. The runners but in parallel to the
    runners on the wall. Again these ends factory
    design to clip together make the attaching strong
    and easy. The main runners are space 1200mm c/c
    apart.
  • When all the runners are in place they are tied
    together by cross-tees. These are spaced at 600mm
    c/c apart. The ends f the cross-tees are factory
    designed to fit into slots in the runners
    ensuring a strong and easy connection.
  • Once this grid system is in place the services
    can be installed. These services are the
    lighting, ventilation/ air-conditioning, smoke
    alarms and the sprinklers. These services met the
    office requirements (type 5) of the building code
    of Australia.
  • The ceiling tiles are then installed and the
    appreciate modification are made for the
    services.
  • Some of the tiles may need to be trimmed down
    shortened this is because of the size and the
    size of the tiles are not completely compatible.
    These tiles are made from plaster.

46
Warehouse Offices/ Lunch Room and
Toilets-Suspended Ceiling
Runner
cross-tees
Source- http//www.popularmechanics.com
47
Warehouse Offices/ Lunch Room and Toilets
  • Alternatives (walls)
  • An alternative to the timber frame walls of the
    Offices and Lunch Room could have been office
    partitions. they are constructed from steel
    panels and have a baked enamel finish. These were
    turn down because they did not have the thermal
    or acoustic properties a timber frame.

Source- http//www.lkgoodwin.com
48
Warehouse Offices/ Lunch Room and Toilets
  • Alternatives (Suspended Ceiling)
  • A wood grid system is one option, however this is
    much to costly and does not really suite the
    rooms.
  • Steel Ceilings are an other option these were
    turned down because of cost, also the thermal and
    acoustic properties are not quite as good as the
    standard suspended ceilings.

Source- http//www.woodgrid.com
Source-http//www.steelceilings.com/
49
Warehouse Offices/ Lunch Room and Toilets
  • Flooring
  • Offices and Lunch Room-
  • These rooms will have carpet flooring.
  • This is because it has good acoustic and thermal
    properties. Also carpet has an good aesthetic
    quality to it.
  • Basic Construction Process-
  • Trackless strips are nailed down using concrete
    nails, then carpet padding is laid down and cut
    to size. The carpet is laid on top of this, the
    fixing at wall edges can be seen in the picture
    across the page. However this process would be
    done by a professional carpet layer
  • Alternative
  • Timber floor boards this was neglected mainly
    because of maintenance. Since the offices and
    lunchroom are in warehouse the floorboards would
    need to be sanded and polished quite regularly
    (where as carpet can just be vacuumed and steamed
    cleaned) making the flooring very costly. Also
    the installation of floorboards make it less
    attractive then carpet.

Source- http//houseandhome.msn.com/Improve/Laying
Carpet1010.aspx
50
Warehouse Offices/ Lunch Room and Toilets
  • Toilet-
  • Laminated Stone tile-tile size is 385mm by 385mm
  • Glue-down Installations
  • Alternative
  • Ceramic tile- these were disregarded because of
    cost and the location of the toilets. Since the
    these toilets are in the warehouse it was
    perceived that tiles could be damaged.

Source- http//www.ebuild.com/guide/products
51
Warehouse shelving system
  • This racking system is good for warehouses where
    it is necessary to keep a wide variety of
    articles in pallets.
  • There is direct access to all stored pallets.
  • Pallets can be handled with no need to move the
    others.
  • Easy stock control as each place is a one-pallet
    position.
  • Absolute load storage flexibility, both in terms
    of weight and volume.

Source http//usmecalux.com/en-US/prodPalletRack.j
sp
52
Warehouse shelving system
  • Supplier MECALUX
  • FRAMES
  • Post dimensions U122
  • A - 43/4".
  • B - 211/16".
  • g (GAUGE) 12
  • Post spacing
  • 84
  • Frame capacity
  • 39,380 (lbs)
  • BEAMS
  • Beam length
  • 84
  • Beam height
  • 43/4"

53
Warehouse Lighting
  • Hilux Highbay warehouse lighting
  • Pros
  • High level of performance
  • Cheap
  • Minimal glare
  • Self venting cools globe down and prevents dusts
    build up
  • Good horizontal illumination

Dimensions Lighting spaced at 7500mm
Warehouse lighting grid
Picture http//www.google.com.au/search?q"wareho
uselighting"ieUTF-8oeUTF-8hlenmetacrcoun
tryAU
54
ROLLERDOORS ON SITE
  • Supplier STEEL LINE GARAGE DOORS the team that
    cares
  • Type Industrial series B roller door
  • Positives attribute
  • robust high quality roller door
  • manufactured from genuine BHP Colorbond
  • suited to warehouses
  • Dimensions
  • Opening 5000mm high x 5000mm wide

55
FIRE EXITS for warehouse
  • Requirements
  • Fire exit doors must open outwards
  • Any spot in warehouse must have 2 exit options,
    both within 20m.
  • Fire hose reel must be with in 4m of fire exits
  • Warehouse design
  • 4 fire exits

56
FIREWALLS
  • No firewalls were needed in the construction of
    the warehouse and showroom/offices.
  • This was because in accordance with the
    Australian Standards, a two hour fire wall is
    needed if walls are constructed within 3m of a
    boundary or separate dwelling.

57
Security Office - Primary Framing
  • The security office is attached to the front of
    the warehouse. Its dimensions are 6000x6000mm
    and its steel frame and cladding will be similar
    to that of the warehouses systems of framing and
    cladding.
  • The columns will be 89x89x3mm SHS (square hollow
    sections). Caged bolts through the base plate and
    non shrink grout will hold the columns to the
    footings, the same footing system as used in the
    warehouse. The office columns will be spaced at
    2000c/c therefore 4 columns will be on either
    side of the office.
  • Roofing beams will be 200UB22, joined at the
    ridge. They will connect to the columns by a web
    plate and two M20 bolts.
  • C Sections 152mm deep, 64mm flange, will be used
    to support the roofing of the security office,
    these will sit perpendicular to the beams and
    will be spaced at 2000mm in line with
    AS1562.1-1992, AS4040.1-1992 and AS4040.1-1992

58
Primary Framing Joint- security Office
  • Members
  • C Sections 152mm deep, 64mm flange
  • 200UB22
  • Web Plate
  • 89x89x3mm SHS
  • M20 bolts

59
Security Office Wall Cladding
  • The front of the office will have a double slide
    opening, 6mm Laminated glass in lightweight
    Aluminium sections.

60
Security Office - Roofing
  • LYSAGHT LONGLINE 305 flat-pan, concealed-fixed
    roofing, like the warehouse, will be the roofing
    for the security office. Its spans, spacing,
    strength, protective coating and the like, are
    all the same as the warehouse.

61
Security office framing roof and guttering
  • The guttering used for the office will be D/
    Quad gutter.
  • This type of guttering, like the roof cladding,
    is manufactured by blue scope steel. This means
    the gutters are compatible with steel roofing and
    come in a full range of matching colors.
  • The office will have two rectangular down pipes,
    one at each end of the 6m sides.
  • The down pipes will be 100x50mm and made of
    acrylic paint coated aluminium, 0.55mm thick.

A 65 mm (nominal)B 90 mm (nominal)C 115
mm (nominal)
Source-http//www.bluescopesteel.com.au
62
Showroom
  • The Showroom is a two storey structure, free
    standing off the Warehouse. Its primary use as a
    building is devoted to the management and
    presentation of goods for the company.
  • The building consists of
  • Ground Floor
  • Reception
  • Open plan Showroom
  • Toilets
  • Connecting Lift
  • Stairwell
  • First Floor
  • Board Room
  • Open plan offices
  • Toilets
  • Lounge

63
Showroom Plan View
Ground Floor
First Floor
20m
20m
20m
30m
Toilets
Fire Escape
64
Showroom Foundations
  • The slab for the showroom will be a stiffened
    (reinforced) raft slab with pad footing under the
    stanchions/ columns.
  • This is because the site will be excavated, so a
    slab can be used. This will make the access to
    the easier (in terms of steps or ramps). The slab
    provides a good working platform for the rest of
    the construction process. The slab is low
    maintenance and is robust and difficult to
    damage. It also has low long term movement which
    works well for the class M soil of the site.
  • Both the slab and the pad footings have been
    reinforced using steel rods. This reinforcement
    is 3-11 TM (trench mesh) with a slab fabric above
    it.
  • Alternative
  • Pad footing on there own could not have been used
    since the brickwork (cladding) need sit on strip
    footing.
  • A raft slab could have been used on its own,
    however since of the connection of the stanches/
    columns ( the depth of the bolts) to the slab
    would have had to be extremely thick all over.
  • (Actual foundations used)
  • So as to not wast material the actual foundations
    used are a normal sized raft slab (150mm thick
    with trenches 400mm deep and 300mm by 300mm) with
    pad footing under the raft slab where the
    stanches/ columns connect with the slab depth of
    the slab does not need to be excessively thick
    all over.

65
Showroom Primary Structure
  • The Showroom, like the Warehouse will be of steel
    frame construction.
  • 410UB54 Beams spaced at 6000mm will be used for
    the main roof structure, and the sub floor
    structure of the first floor.
  • These members were the minimum size required for
    holding the dead and live loads for the areas,
    and thus reducing the cost of the overall
    construction by not using oversized beams in the
    structure.
  • 80x80x13mm thick sheer stiffener plates top and
    bottom with butt welded ends. 6CFW to web on both
    sides of the column.
  • 16mm thick base plate. 6CFW.
  • Pre drilled holes for bolting
  • Brace to support roofing beams to sit on.
  • The columns of the Showroom will be 410UC54 and
    spaced at 6000mm to be in line with the Universal
    Beams in the roof.

66
Showroom Connections
  • At the top and bottom of the flange plates 4 x
    M20 8.8/TF bolts will be used for the ridge
    connection. The Ridge connection is a flexible
    connection which gives simple support to members.
    This method of connection is much cheaper as
    welding costs reduces due to members being bolted
    together on site, raised into place by a crane
    and bolted into place.
  • Knee Joint 4 x M30 8.8/TF bolts at the top and
    bottom of the flange plates, and butt welded to
    form a rigid connection.
  • This combines beam and column into one structural
    entity
  • This gives a higher restraint to beam rotation.
  • The Column connection to the footing will be held
    through the Base Plate and Non Shrink grout with
    4 x M16 caged Bolts embedded 200mm deep into
    footing.

67
Showroom Bracing
  • 18mm diameter rods for cross bracing.
  • Fixed to columns via 90 x 90 x 10mm angles

68
Showroom Secondary Structure
  • For the Walls of the Showroom, considering the
    outer structure of the showroom is brick veneer,
    we are using Z sections, 102mm deep, 53mm broad
    flange, 49mm narrow flange, 15mm lip depth, and
    1.9mm BMT. This has a section mass of 3.23kg/m,
    according to Stramit Girts and Purlins table.
  • The Girts will span 6000mm, from showroom column
    to column. And will be spaced in accordance with
    the spaning capabilities of the cladding.

69
Showroom Roofing
  • The showroom roofing will be the same as the
    warehouse roofing to maintain looks consistent
    through the buildings.

70
Showroom/Offices cladding
  • BRICK VENEER
  • The cladding for the showroom/offices is brick
    veneer. This was chosen because of the aesthetic
    values which bricks bring to a building. As this
    building represents the company it is important
    to make it stand out.
  • A Hawthorn wirecut brick supplied by Austral
    Bricks will be used.
  • BRICK SPECIFICATIONS
  • Dimensions
  • 290 x 110 x 76mm
  • Compressive strength gt30MPa
  • Breaking Load gt4kN
  • SUB FLOOR VENTILATION
  • Regulations ask that we provide 7300mm² per metre
    of wall length
  • WALL TIES
  • Brick ties will be installed in accordance with
    AS 3700 SAA Masonry Code.
  • FLASHING
  • The flashing material will extend from the bottom
    of the wall panel into the cavity and then be
    built in to the brick work.

Steel framing brick ties
Pictures http//www.bluescopesteel.com.au/index.c
fm/objectID.C6764D08-6DB3-11D4-989F00508BA5461F
71
Showroom Cladding
  • The cladding of the showroom will be made up of
    two parts.
  • The red outline of the showroom to the right
    shows the brickwork cladding to the exterior of
    the building.
  • The Blue outline round the showroom shows the
    walls that will consist of glass. This will be
    6mm Laminated toughened in Lightweight Aluminium
    Sections.

72
Office Construction Showroom
  • As the basic layout of out showroom is an area
    without any intermittent columns, (the roofing
    beams span the whole width), this means that
    there are no internal load bearing walls.
  • Therefore 70 x 45mm studs spaced at 600 centres
    are all thats required. The only loads
    supported is the dead loads of the plasterboard,
    lighting, ventilation, and services.
  • Simple timber framing is used, and 13mm
    plasterboard is glued and nailed to this.
  • The timber walls also allow for the required
    services to be delivered to each office.
  • The Showroom will have Pink Batts of R-Value
    2.0 in the walls and Pink Batts of R-Value 3.5
    in the roof.

73
Office Construction Showroom
  • A suspended ceiling has been constructed
    throughout all the office areas. For this, a
    grid and tile system has been used, with
    aluminium cross brackets holding up foam tiles.
  • The benefit of having suspended ceilings in an
    office is that it provides thermal and acoustic
    insulation, and also allows for future electrical
    modifications to be made. E.g. Extra internet
    cables.
  • The offices have been constructed after the
    subfloor and initial structure has been
    completed.

Source-http//www.steelceilings.com/
Source- http//www.woodgrid.com
74
Showroom flooring
  • Ground Floor
  • The grown floor of the showroom will be a
    display/ showroom area, showing the companys
    products. Since this area is a represents the
    company (i.e. the company image) we will use
    timber floorboards. This provide the room with a
    classy finish.
  • The floorboards sit on 70mm by 35mm F17 seasoned
    hardwood joist that are spaced at 450mm c/c.
    These sit on bearers 20mm by 45mm which then sit/
    are connected to the slab.
  • Upper Floor
  • The upper floor will also be floorboards for
    similar reason. For the client may need to
    present a classy image of the company.
  • The second story is support by 410UB54 steel
    beams that are connected to the portal frame by
    brackets. 150UB14 steel beams run parrel to the
    to the 410UB54 steel beams acting as support for
    the bearers. These 150UB14 beams are spaced at
    1200mm c/c. The bearers will sit on these 150UB14
    beams. They bearers are 2/90 by 45 f17 seasoned
    hardwood, spaning 1200mm and are spaced 1400c/c.
    On these bearers F17 70mm by 35mm floor joist
    sit. They are spaced at 450c/c. Then on these
    floor joist the floorboards are lied down. Secret
    nails will be used nail the floorboards down.
    This is to add to the executive look required.
  • Alternatives
  • When deciding the finishes required for the floor
    carpet was one option considered. This was
    because it posses good thermal and acoustic
    properties. There is also a cost benefit with
    carpet flooring. Although a carpet flooring does
    not really have the aesthetic look the client
    desires.

75
Showroom flooring
  • Supplier BIG RIVER TIMBER FLOORS
  • DIMENSIONS
  • Plank lenghts 2.4m
  • Width 130mm
  • Thickness 14mm
  • TIMBER SPECIES
  • Flooded gum (average density 750kg/m³)
  • The allowable point live load (working stress) of
    Flooded Gum at a thickness of 14mm a stress grade
    of F27 and a span of 450mm is 3.7kn. This meets
    the floor live loading requirements of AS1170.1
  • APPLICATION
  • Floor boards will be joined centrally over the
    floor joists. The butt joints will be staggered
    to produce a random appearance across the floor.
  • Fixing requirements
  • Nail type Machine driven 50 x 2.5mm brad
  • Two nails to be used at each joist
  • Minimum edge distance for nailing of 10-12mm
  • Nails to be punched 2-3mm below board surface

76
Showroom Staircase
  • 6CFW to 6mm brackets.
  • Solid timber treads bolted to the brackets.
  • 12mm thick base and end plates.
  • 2 x M12 chemset anchors to slab
  • Min 25mm of non-shrink grout under plate

77
Wheelchair porch lift
  • A wheelchair porch lift will be installed in the
    showroom/office building so the offices and
    conference room on the second floor can be
    accessed by wheelchairs.
  • The lift will be situated close to the main
    entrance for convenience.

Drawing not to scale
Picture http//www.acessinc.com/wheelchair_porch_
lifts.htm
  • Supplier TRUS-T-LIFT
  • Deck dimensions-
  • Length 1372mm
  • Width 864mm
  • Total width of lift 1219mm
  • Tower dimensions-
  • Tower height3607mm
  • Total travel 3048mm

Porch lift location
First Floor
Ground Floor
78
Disabled Toilet
  • The disabled toilet is located on the ground
    floor of the showroom to allow for easy access.
    The male and female toilets are both suited for
    disabled and non-disabled patrons.
  • Toilets on first floor are located directly above
    the ground floor toilets to minimise plumbing
    costs.
  • The toilet room is 4m² to allow for a wheel chair
    to adequately move.
  • The door way is 0.960m wide to allow for
    wheelchair access.
  • There are two toilets on the first floor, keeping
    in accordance with Australian Standards of one
    toilet for every 20 staff.
  • A DALCO type 18201 hand rail has been installed
    to give wheelchair patients extra mobility as
    well as providing a firm support when using
    fixture.
  • The hand basin is installed at a height of
    0.800m.

79
PARKING REQUIREMENTS
  • 1.5 car spaces needed for every 100m² of floor
    space
  • 1 disabled car space for every 100 normal car
    spaces
  • Normal car park dimensions 2.6m x 4.9-5.4m
  • Disabled car park dimension 3.2m x 4.9-5.4m

80
PARKING ON SITE
  • Floor space area on site 2600m²
  • 39 standard car spaces
  • 2 disabled car space

81
References
  • Block C Notes
  • Building Code of Australia
  • Construction and Structures 2 Lecture Notes,
    Jeremy J. Hamm, 2003
  • Pocket Span Table Book, Timber Promotion
    Council, 2003
  • Steel Line Garage Doors, 2004 Catalogue
  • Stramit 2002 Price and service Guide 2002
  • www.bigrivertimbers.com.au
  • http//www.bluescopesteel.com.au
  • http//www.thomasarmstrong.com.uk
  • http//www.workcover.vic.gov.au/vwa/home.nsf/pages
    /so_construction_attach2/File/Panel_Collapse.pdf
  • http//www.popularmechanics.com
  • http//www.lkgoodwin.com
  • http//www.woodgrid.com
  • http//www.steelceilings.com/
  • http//usmecalux.com/en-US/prodPalletRack.jsp
  • http//houseandhome.msn.com/Improve/LayingCarpet10
    10.aspx
  • http//www.ebuild.com/guide/products
  • http//www.acessinc.com/wheelchair_porch_lifts.htm
View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Warehouse Assignment

Description:

Warehouse Assignment Toby Labuc 201191189 Joseph McCann 300175876 Daniel O dwyer 300176765 Gareth Bellchambers 300170954 Construction Overview The BDC have ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:332
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 82
Provided by: Adm984
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Warehouse Assignment


1
Warehouse Assignment
  • Toby Labuc 201191189
  • Joseph McCann 300175876
  • Daniel Odwyer 300176765
  • Gareth Bellchambers 300170954

2
Construction Overview
  • The BDC have purchased a block of land at, lot 4,
    Baines Crescent, in the industrial area of
    Torquay. (Zone 3)
  • The site is not currently surrounded by other
    structures. Therefore setbacks are not required
    for any other reason than achieving an approved
    fire rating.

3
Design Features
  • In order to achieve a professional, and appealing
    shop front, we have located the warehouse behind
    the showroom, and concealed any transport
    vehicles.
  • In order to keep the warehouse as multi
    functional as possible, we have decided to keep
    the area column free, having steel roofing beams
    spanning the whole distance.
  • One of our main Objectives was to achieve a free
    flowing, and efficient working area for the
    warehouse. And a modern showroom, that will
    provide the company with an aesthetically
    pleasing shopfront.

4
Site Layout
  • The showroom has been positioned towards the
    front of the site.
  • The warehouse located toward the back.
  • Next to the showroom is a large customer/ staff
    car park.
  • There is a large area of the land devoted to
    providing trucks with adequate turning space.
  • The Warehouse and showroom have been designed and
    built as separate structures.

2
4
1
3
5
30m
54m
6m
6m
20m
30m
6m
6
Warehouse layout
Security Office
5m
Roller Doors
Offices
Lunch Room
Toilets
30m
54m
7
Excavation of site
  • As you can see from the site layout, the
    geographical characteristics of our site, show a
    slope running from the back to the front. As our
    warehouse cant have any internal steps (due to
    forklift access) we need to level the affected
    area.
  • However, as the Showroom is a separate structure,
    it can be levelled to a different origin point.

Warehouse
Showroom
8
Excavation of Site
  • Not only does the immediate area under the
    warehouse need to be levelled, the surrounding
    areas also need to be excavated to the same
    depth.
  • This is to allow fire exit doors to be opened
    outwards, and for any transport vehicles to be
    able to access the roller doors with out any
    fuss.
  • Excavating the site is a costly exercise, yet for
    the smooth running of the company, we see it as
    necessary procedure.

9
Footings and Foundations
  • Soil classification for our site is Class M
  • For this we have chosen to use a standard raft
    slab, yet will provide extra strength and
    stability through the addition of pad footings
    under all necessary columns.

10
Slab and Footings
  • First, the site is excavated to the required
    depths for pad footings, and raft slab. In
    accordance with the engineers specifications, the
    pad footings need to be embedded into the clay
    foundations to a min of 200mm.
  • Steel reinforcement is then placed in position
    for the pad footings. Keeping a 45mm encasing of
    cement around all members, top and bottom. This
    ensures that no water or oxygen can come in
    contact with the steel causing corrosion.

11
Slab and Footings
  • Once the pad footings have been poured and set,
    the reinforcement for the raft slab is
    positioned.
  • This then allows for the raft slab to be poured.
    Plastic chairs are used to position the steel
    mesh at the correct height, keeping a 45mm
    covering of concrete around all steel members.

12
Slab and Footings
  • As our slab covers a large area, noticeable
    differential movement will occur. To avoid the
    movement from creating cracks in our rigid slab,
    we will space 50mm deep saw cuts every 12 13
    feet apart, acting as expansion Joints.
  • These saw cuts will preferably cut through the
    top layer of longitudinal steel mesh, thus
    allowing for the slab to open up, and relieve any
    tensile stress.
  • An appropriate sealant shall be used to fill in
    these cuts, keeping the steel reinforcement
    protected from corrosion, yet giving the
    flexibility required.
  • These cuts are to be made between 12 to 24 hours
    after the slab has been poured, in order to
    prevent any immediate cracking.

13
Warehouse Primary Structure
  • We have chosen to use steel Portal Frames for our
    primary structure.
  • Definition. A continuous rigid frame with a
    restrained joint between the column and beam.
    (Jeremy Ham, lecture notes, portal frames.)

14
Advantages of Portal Frames
  • Due to the material used (steel) and the design
    of each Portal Frame, they are able to span large
    distances (from 15 45m) without the use of
    intermittent columns.
  • The pre-fabricated members of the frame have been
    designed in a manner that allows for simple, and
    quick erection. For example, there are small
    brackets placed on the columns, at the required
    height, which allow for the roofing beams to rest
    in place while the trades persons fix them to
    each other.

15
Advantages of Portal Frames
  • As there is only a couple of welders, steel
    workers, and a crane driver necessary in the
    construction of these frames, only a limited
    amount of trades are present.
  • All of these factors also dramatically reduce the
    costs associated with normal primary structures.

16
Alternative Framing
  • An alternative framing system to the portal frame
    is precast concrete panels.
  • This framing system uses precast concrete panels
    instead of stanchions/ columns. The load from the
    roof is passed on down through the concrete
    panels.
  • The rafters, bracing and strut ties transfer the
    roof load on to the concrete panels. The rafter
    are connected by a steel plate that is bolted
    into the panel.
  • The benefits of using this system is the precast
    concrete panels give the building a good finish
    for the are factory made so there are no
    imperfections, therefore no additional wall
    cladding is required, saving money.
  • However there are large expenses involved in the
    transportation of the precast concrete panels.
    Also the walls need to be erected erected using
    cranes and other heavy machinery, which can make
    them quite costly in comparison to portal frame
    and steel sheet cladding. In addition there are
    high OHS risk involved in using concrete panels
    which also adds to the cost of this type of
    framing system.

Source- Ham, J.J., Lecture notes, Tilt up
PowerPoint presentation
Source-http//www.workcover.vic.gov.au/dir090/vwa/
home.nsf/pages/so_construction_attach2/File/Panel
_Collapse.pdf
17
Glossary for Steel Members
  • When we describe a universal beam or an universal
    column, we use the format Depth, Name of
    Member, and weight per lineal meter. E.g.
    410UB54
  • For all primary structures, we will use I
    beams. And for all secondary structures we will
    use C sections
  • 6CFW this refers to the welding method,
    connecting the web to the flange. E.g. 6mm
    thick, continuous fillet weld.
  • BMT bare metal thickness

18
Steel Members - Warehouse
  • 360 UB 51. These members have been chosen as the
    minimum required, taking into account for the
    dead and live loads for the area. This was done
    to achieve an acceptable cost effectiveness.
  • 100 x 16mm thick sheer stiffener plates top and
    bottom. But welded end. 6CFW to web on both
    sides of column.
  • 16mm thick base plate. 6CFW.
  • Pre drilled holes for bolting
  • Brace to support roofing beams to sit on.

19
Steel Members - Warehouse
  • 410 UB 54. These members have been chosen as the
    minimum required, taking into account for the
    dead and live loads for the area. This was done
    to achieve an acceptable cost effectiveness.
  • Beams at a 6º roof pitch
  • 200 x 25mm thick end plate, with butt welded
    flanges.
  • 200 x 32mm thick end plate, with butt welded
    flanges.

20
Connections - Warehouse
  • Ridge Joint 4 x M20 8.8/TF bolts at the top and
    bottom of the flange plates.
  • This is referred to as a flexible connection.
  • A flexible connection gives simple support with
    reduced costs, (doesn't include need for bracing)
    and as it is bolted on site, there is less
    welding.

21
Connections - Warehouse
  • Knee Joint 4 x M30 8.8/TF bolts at the top and
    bottom of the flange plates, and butt welded to
    form a rigid connection.
  • This combines beam and column into one structural
    entity
  • This gives a higher restraint to beam rotation.
  • However is more complex to fabricate, is more
    difficult to erect with high tolerance, and is
    more costly.

22
Connections - Warehouse
  • 4 x M16 caged Bolts
  • Embedded 300mm deep into footing.
  • Minimum of 25mm non shrink grout under base
    plate.
  • This is called a rigid base plate connection.

23
Roof Bracing - Warehouse
  • 20 mm diameter rods for cross bracing, slotted
    through hole in web. With universal wind bracing
    bracket used to tension rods.
  • Hook roof bracing up to underside of every second
    purlin with R6 diameter hooks prior to tensioning.

24
Wall Bracing - Warehouse
  • 20mm diameter rods for cross bracing.
  • Fixed to columns via 90 x 90 x 10mm angles

25
Secondary Structure - Warehouse
  • The secondary structure is in place to provide
    extra fixing points for any cladding used. This
    allows for a reduction in the size any cladding,
    as it does not have to span great distances.
  • The secondary structure will be fixed to the
    primary structure by bolting the webs to
    pre-welded brackets.

9000mm
2000
26
Secondary Structure - Warehouse
  • Due to different wind loads on different areas of
    the structure, we need to provide extra purlins
    and gurts in order for the cladding to have
    adequate strength.
  • For the Walls, we are using Z sections, 254mm
    deep, 79mm broad flange, 74mm narrow flange, 19mm
    lip depth, and 1.9mm BMT. This has a section
    mass of 6.39kg/m
  • These will be spaced at 2900mm top and bottom of
    the wall (end span), and at 3000mm internal span.

27
Secondary Structure - Warehouse
  • For the Roof, we will be using C sections,
    254mm deep, 76mm flange, 19mm lip depth, and
    1.9mm BMT. This has a section mass of 6.39kg/m
  • These will have an end span 2000mm, and an
    internal span of 2500mm.

28
Wall Cladding
  • LYSAGHT TRIMWALL Rib-and-pan walling (steel
    sheeting)
  • This wall cladding was chosen because it ties in
    with the roof cladding. Since it is manufactured
    by the same company the finishes can be
    consistent throughout.
  • Wall cladding made from ZINCALUME steel (meaning
    it is coated in aluminium/zinc alloy) this is in
    compliance with AS1397-G550-AZ150. It is this
    that gives it an excellent corrosion resistance.
    This is an important factor in terms of cladding
    since the warehouse is located in a costal area.
  • In addition this cladding is lightweight and
    versatile
  • Like the roof cladding, the finish of wall steel
    sheeting will be acrylic painted.

29
Wall Cladding
  • Span
  • End Span
  • 2900
  • Internal Span
  • 3000
  • The maximum recommended support spacings are
    based on testing in accordance with AS1562.1-1992
    and AS4040.2-1992 (http//www.bluescopesteel.com.a
    u).
  • The wind pressure capacity is determined in
    accordance with the engineers specifications.

Source- http//www.bluescopesteel.com.au
30
Wall Cladding
  • LYSAGHT TRIMWALL Rib-and-pan walling (steel
    sheeting) is fastened by screws on every grit
    with weatherlok washers beneath head of the
    screw. Predrilled holes in sheeting should be 3mm
    larger than screw shank.

Source- http//www.bluescopesteel.com.au
31
Wall Cladding
  • Alternative to the wall cladding system being
    used
  • Precast concrete panels combined with a steel
    sheet cladding.
  • The system was turned down because it additional
    materials are required and there are large
    transport expenses when transporting precast
    concrete adding to the cost of the construction.
    The benefits of using this system is that the
    wall cladding cannot be damaged by the forklift,
    however this can easily be combated by the
    location of the whare house shelving.
  • Another alternative is just using precast
    concrete or tilt up panels this option was turned
    down for it did not tie in with the roof cladding
    also since the panels constructed on site there
    is a greater chance of imperfections. In addition
    there is greater OHS when dealing with tilt-up
    panels.

Source- http//www.thomasarmstrong.com.uk
Sourcehttp//www.workcover.vic.gov.au/vwa/home.ns
f/pages/so_construction_attach2/File/Panel_Collap
se.pdf
32
Roofing Cladding - Warehouse
  • The roof cladding used on this warehouse is
    LYSAGHT LONGLINE 305 flat-pan, concealed-fixed
    roofing which is steel with a ZINCALUM coating.
  • This coating is made form aluminium/zinc
    alloy-coated steel.
  • This is manufactured by Blue Scope Steel.

Source- http//www.bluescopesteel.com.au
33
Roofing Cladding - Warehouse
  • Spans
  • - Internal Span
  • - with a maximum spacing of 2500mm
  • -End Span
  • - with a maximum spacing of 2000mm
  • The maximum recommended roof support spacing are
    based on testing in accordance with
    AS1562.1-1992,AS4040.1-1992 and AS4040.1-1992
    (http//www.bluescopesteel.com.au)
  • This span takes into consideration both
    resistance to wind pressure and light foot
    traffic (loads due to incidental maintenance).
    As there is a greater amount of pressure on the
    edge of the warehouse, shorter spans are required
    in those areas to provide extra strength.

34
Roofing Cladding - Warehouse
  • The base metal thickness (BMT) of this roof
    cladding is 0.70mm (http//www.bluescopesteel.com.
    au)
  • It has a 300MPa minimum yield stress and 150g/m²
    minimum coating mass this is in compliance with
    AS 1397-2001 G300, AZ150 (http//www.bluescopestee
    l.com.au).

35
Roofing Cladding - Warehouse
  • The finish/ coating on this cladding is acrylic,
    this is because of the availability of acrylic
    paint, good corrosion resistance, good colour
    performance and gloss retention, and has good
    abrasion resistance. The cladding will be
    pre-painted.
  • The cladding will have ridge capping running the
    ridge of the roof. There will also be flashing
    on the ends of the warehouse.
  • The cladding will be fastened using screws. They
    shall be fastened as per metal deck roofing, plus
    weatherlok washers beneath head of the roof
    fastener to stop water leakage. Nominally longer
    than standard fasteners and holes in sheeting
    should be predrilled 3mm larger than screw shanks
    (http//www.bluescopesteel.com.au)

36
Roofing Cladding - Warehouse
  • It is a strong and durable product, and its
    aluminium and zinc coating give it a corrosion
    resistance that is vital for the costal
    environment where this warehouse is located.
  • It is also traditionally used in industrial
    buildings and applications.
  • There is a corrosion warranty of 25 years on this
    material.
  • As long as this steel sheeting is well maintained
    and the coat in accordance with the engineers
    specifications, a reasonable life span can be
    ensured thus keeping coast down.
  • Also the cladding combines well with most other
    building materials and treatments.

37
Roofing Cladding - Warehouse
  • Some alternative roof cladding systems are
  • LYSAGHT INTREGRITY 820, this has all most of
    benefits of LYSAGHT INTREGRITY 305, however
    LYSAGHT INTREGRITY 820 can not be used on roof
    that have a pitch greater than 1 degree.
  • Another alternative was Aluminium Roofing was
    also neglected this was due to the cost of using
    this product. The warehouse has quite a large
    roof area and also if this type f cladding was
    use on the walls as well that would come at a
    great expense.

38
Guttering - Warehouse
  • The guttering used for this warehouse will be
    D/ Quad gutter.
  • This type of guttering was chosen because it is
    manufactured by blue scope steel like the roof
    cladding. This means the gutters are compatible
    with steel roofing and come in a full range of
    matching colors.
  • This gutter slops at a minimum fall of 1 in every
    500, therefore over the length of building the
    guttering will need to drop 10.8 cm.

39
Guttering - Warehouse
  • A 65 mm
  • B 90 mm
  • C 115 mm
  • Source-http//www.bluescopesteel.com.au

40
Guttering - Warehouse
  • Other types of guttering were not considered
    because we wanted to maintain the same materials
    and colors in the roof and gutter.
  • Also seeing as both the roof cladding and the
    guttering came from the same manufacturer (blue
    scope steel) they were transported together
    reducing the costs. This also meant only one
    invoice.
  • In the long run is saved a lot of time and money.

41
Guttering Down Pipes
  • The down pipes that are being using are also from
    Blue Scope Steel.
  • We are using this type down piping for the same
    reason as the guttering, it will tie in with the
    building, the required colours are available and
    it will make the construction easier using the
    same manufacturer for the roof cladding,
    guttering and down pipes.

42
Guttering Down Pipes
  • The warehouse will have rectangular down pipes.
  • These will be made from aluminium, this is
    because it has excellent corrosion resistance.
    The finishes (eg acrylic paint) will still be
    consistent throughout the roofing.
  • The sizing of these pipes
  • Dimensions-150 x 150 mm
  • BMT (mm)- 0.55
  • Spacing (m)- 18
  • Finish- Acrylic Paint

43
Warehouse Offices/ Lunch Room and Toilets
construction process
  • The wall frames ware the first to go up. The
    studs, top plate and bottom plate are nailed
    together creating the basic wall shape. It is in
    this process that doors and windows cutout. Then
    noggins a placed in between the 600c/c spaced
    studs. This is to straighten up (make them
    square) the walls.
  • Once all this is done the walls are erected,
    using a ramset gun to nail the bottom plate into
    the slab. Then when they are in place the
    plasterboards can start being fixed on. Before
    this process is finished the necessary services
    must be installed.
  • Once the services are installed the insulation
    can be put in the walls. When this is all
    completed the rest of the plasterboard can be
    screwed on to the wall.
  • The connections between each plasterboard sheet
    will then be plastered over, this is to make sure
    the finish will look nice.
  • Lastly the wall will have a normal painted
    finish.

44
Warehouse Offices/ Lunch Room and Toilets
  • The offices, lunch room and toilets are all
    constructed by traditional timber framing
    techniques. Although the survives required for
    each room may differ.
  • For the comfort of the employer (of the client)
    and to keep the warehouse versatile the offices,
    lunch rooms and toilets will be insulated with
    batts of R-Value 2.0. This is for both thermal
    and acoustic befits.
  • The wall height will be 2700mm above the floor.
    The suspended ceiling will sit just below the
    height of the walls.
  • The materials required are
  • Studs 70mm by 45mm (note wall are non load
    bearing)
  • Noggins 70mm by 45
  • Top and Bottom Plates 70mm by 45mm
  • Plasterboard 13mm
  • Insulation- Pink Bats

45
Warehouse Offices/ Lunch Room and Toilets
  • Suspended Ceiling
  • The suspended Ceiling in hung from the exposed
    beam in the roof. Small metal clips are screwed
    into the beam. From these clips thin steel rods
    hang down to just below the wall height. Attached
    to the end of these rods are another style of
    small clips. Which then are attached to a series
    of metal clips.
  • The clips are attached to the runners (aluminium
    supports for the ceiling tiles). These clips are
    factory designed to attach to the runners
    ensuring maximum support in the fixings.
  • Around the walls right angle shaped runners are
    attached to the wall about 5cm below the top of
    the wall. The runners but in parallel to the
    runners on the wall. Again these ends factory
    design to clip together make the attaching strong
    and easy. The main runners are space 1200mm c/c
    apart.
  • When all the runners are in place they are tied
    together by cross-tees. These are spaced at 600mm
    c/c apart. The ends f the cross-tees are factory
    designed to fit into slots in the runners
    ensuring a strong and easy connection.
  • Once this grid system is in place the services
    can be installed. These services are the
    lighting, ventilation/ air-conditioning, smoke
    alarms and the sprinklers. These services met the
    office requirements (type 5) of the building code
    of Australia.
  • The ceiling tiles are then installed and the
    appreciate modification are made for the
    services.
  • Some of the tiles may need to be trimmed down
    shortened this is because of the size and the
    size of the tiles are not completely compatible.
    These tiles are made from plaster.

46
Warehouse Offices/ Lunch Room and
Toilets-Suspended Ceiling
Runner
cross-tees
Source- http//www.popularmechanics.com
47
Warehouse Offices/ Lunch Room and Toilets
  • Alternatives (walls)
  • An alternative to the timber frame walls of the
    Offices and Lunch Room could have been office
    partitions. they are constructed from steel
    panels and have a baked enamel finish. These were
    turn down because they did not have the thermal
    or acoustic properties a timber frame.

Source- http//www.lkgoodwin.com
48
Warehouse Offices/ Lunch Room and Toilets
  • Alternatives (Suspended Ceiling)
  • A wood grid system is one option, however this is
    much to costly and does not really suite the
    rooms.
  • Steel Ceilings are an other option these were
    turned down because of cost, also the thermal and
    acoustic properties are not quite as good as the
    standard suspended ceilings.

Source- http//www.woodgrid.com
Source-http//www.steelceilings.com/
49
Warehouse Offices/ Lunch Room and Toilets
  • Flooring
  • Offices and Lunch Room-
  • These rooms will have carpet flooring.
  • This is because it has good acoustic and thermal
    properties. Also carpet has an good aesthetic
    quality to it.
  • Basic Construction Process-
  • Trackless strips are nailed down using concrete
    nails, then carpet padding is laid down and cut
    to size. The carpet is laid on top of this, the
    fixing at wall edges can be seen in the picture
    across the page. However this process would be
    done by a professional carpet layer
  • Alternative
  • Timber floor boards this was neglected mainly
    because of maintenance. Since the offices and
    lunchroom are in warehouse the floorboards would
    need to be sanded and polished quite regularly
    (where as carpet can just be vacuumed and steamed
    cleaned) making the flooring very costly. Also
    the installation of floorboards make it less
    attractive then carpet.

Source- http//houseandhome.msn.com/Improve/Laying
Carpet1010.aspx
50
Warehouse Offices/ Lunch Room and Toilets
  • Toilet-
  • Laminated Stone tile-tile size is 385mm by 385mm
  • Glue-down Installations
  • Alternative
  • Ceramic tile- these were disregarded because of
    cost and the location of the toilets. Since the
    these toilets are in the warehouse it was
    perceived that tiles could be damaged.

Source- http//www.ebuild.com/guide/products
51
Warehouse shelving system
  • This racking system is good for warehouses where
    it is necessary to keep a wide variety of
    articles in pallets.
  • There is direct access to all stored pallets.
  • Pallets can be handled with no need to move the
    others.
  • Easy stock control as each place is a one-pallet
    position.
  • Absolute load storage flexibility, both in terms
    of weight and volume.

Source http//usmecalux.com/en-US/prodPalletRack.j
sp
52
Warehouse shelving system
  • Supplier MECALUX
  • FRAMES
  • Post dimensions U122
  • A - 43/4".
  • B - 211/16".
  • g (GAUGE) 12
  • Post spacing
  • 84
  • Frame capacity
  • 39,380 (lbs)
  • BEAMS
  • Beam length
  • 84
  • Beam height
  • 43/4"

53
Warehouse Lighting
  • Hilux Highbay warehouse lighting
  • Pros
  • High level of performance
  • Cheap
  • Minimal glare
  • Self venting cools globe down and prevents dusts
    build up
  • Good horizontal illumination

Dimensions Lighting spaced at 7500mm
Warehouse lighting grid
Picture http//www.google.com.au/search?q"wareho
uselighting"ieUTF-8oeUTF-8hlenmetacrcoun
tryAU
54
ROLLERDOORS ON SITE
  • Supplier STEEL LINE GARAGE DOORS the team that
    cares
  • Type Industrial series B roller door
  • Positives attribute
  • robust high quality roller door
  • manufactured from genuine BHP Colorbond
  • suited to warehouses
  • Dimensions
  • Opening 5000mm high x 5000mm wide

55
FIRE EXITS for warehouse
  • Requirements
  • Fire exit doors must open outwards
  • Any spot in warehouse must have 2 exit options,
    both within 20m.
  • Fire hose reel must be with in 4m of fire exits
  • Warehouse design
  • 4 fire exits

56
FIREWALLS
  • No firewalls were needed in the construction of
    the warehouse and showroom/offices.
  • This was because in accordance with the
    Australian Standards, a two hour fire wall is
    needed if walls are constructed within 3m of a
    boundary or separate dwelling.

57
Security Office - Primary Framing
  • The security office is attached to the front of
    the warehouse. Its dimensions are 6000x6000mm
    and its steel frame and cladding will be similar
    to that of the warehouses systems of framing and
    cladding.
  • The columns will be 89x89x3mm SHS (square hollow
    sections). Caged bolts through the base plate and
    non shrink grout will hold the columns to the
    footings, the same footing system as used in the
    warehouse. The office columns will be spaced at
    2000c/c therefore 4 columns will be on either
    side of the office.
  • Roofing beams will be 200UB22, joined at the
    ridge. They will connect to the columns by a web
    plate and two M20 bolts.
  • C Sections 152mm deep, 64mm flange, will be used
    to support the roofing of the security office,
    these will sit perpendicular to the beams and
    will be spaced at 2000mm in line with
    AS1562.1-1992, AS4040.1-1992 and AS4040.1-1992

58
Primary Framing Joint- security Office
  • Members
  • C Sections 152mm deep, 64mm flange
  • 200UB22
  • Web Plate
  • 89x89x3mm SHS
  • M20 bolts

59
Security Office Wall Cladding
  • The front of the office will have a double slide
    opening, 6mm Laminated glass in lightweight
    Aluminium sections.

60
Security Office - Roofing
  • LYSAGHT LONGLINE 305 flat-pan, concealed-fixed
    roofing, like the warehouse, will be the roofing
    for the security office. Its spans, spacing,
    strength, protective coating and the like, are
    all the same as the warehouse.

61
Security office framing roof and guttering
  • The guttering used for the office will be D/
    Quad gutter.
  • This type of guttering, like the roof cladding,
    is manufactured by blue scope steel. This means
    the gutters are compatible with steel roofing and
    come in a full range of matching colors.
  • The office will have two rectangular down pipes,
    one at each end of the 6m sides.
  • The down pipes will be 100x50mm and made of
    acrylic paint coated aluminium, 0.55mm thick.

A 65 mm (nominal)B 90 mm (nominal)C 115
mm (nominal)
Source-http//www.bluescopesteel.com.au
62
Showroom
  • The Showroom is a two storey structure, free
    standing off the Warehouse. Its primary use as a
    building is devoted to the management and
    presentation of goods for the company.
  • The building consists of
  • Ground Floor
  • Reception
  • Open plan Showroom
  • Toilets
  • Connecting Lift
  • Stairwell
  • First Floor
  • Board Room
  • Open plan offices
  • Toilets
  • Lounge

63
Showroom Plan View
Ground Floor
First Floor
20m
20m
20m
30m
Toilets
Fire Escape
64
Showroom Foundations
  • The slab for the showroom will be a stiffened
    (reinforced) raft slab with pad footing under the
    stanchions/ columns.
  • This is because the site will be excavated, so a
    slab can be used. This will make the access to
    the easier (in terms of steps or ramps). The slab
    provides a good working platform for the rest of
    the construction process. The slab is low
    maintenance and is robust and difficult to
    damage. It also has low long term movement which
    works well for the class M soil of the site.
  • Both the slab and the pad footings have been
    reinforced using steel rods. This reinforcement
    is 3-11 TM (trench mesh) with a slab fabric above
    it.
  • Alternative
  • Pad footing on there own could not have been used
    since the brickwork (cladding) need sit on strip
    footing.
  • A raft slab could have been used on its own,
    however since of the connection of the stanches/
    columns ( the depth of the bolts) to the slab
    would have had to be extremely thick all over.
  • (Actual foundations used)
  • So as to not wast material the actual foundations
    used are a normal sized raft slab (150mm thick
    with trenches 400mm deep and 300mm by 300mm) with
    pad footing under the raft slab where the
    stanches/ columns connect with the slab depth of
    the slab does not need to be excessively thick
    all over.

65
Showroom Primary Structure
  • The Showroom, like the Warehouse will be of steel
    frame construction.
  • 410UB54 Beams spaced at 6000mm will be used for
    the main roof structure, and the sub floor
    structure of the first floor.
  • These members were the minimum size required for
    holding the dead and live loads for the areas,
    and thus reducing the cost of the overall
    construction by not using oversized beams in the
    structure.
  • 80x80x13mm thick sheer stiffener plates top and
    bottom with butt welded ends. 6CFW to web on both
    sides of the column.
  • 16mm thick base plate. 6CFW.
  • Pre drilled holes for bolting
  • Brace to support roofing beams to sit on.
  • The columns of the Showroom will be 410UC54 and
    spaced at 6000mm to be in line with the Universal
    Beams in the roof.

66
Showroom Connections
  • At the top and bottom of the flange plates 4 x
    M20 8.8/TF bolts will be used for the ridge
    connection. The Ridge connection is a flexible
    connection which gives simple support to members.
    This method of connection is much cheaper as
    welding costs reduces due to members being bolted
    together on site, raised into place by a crane
    and bolted into place.
  • Knee Joint 4 x M30 8.8/TF bolts at the top and
    bottom of the flange plates, and butt welded to
    form a rigid connection.
  • This combines beam and column into one structural
    entity
  • This gives a higher restraint to beam rotation.
  • The Column connection to the footing will be held
    through the Base Plate and Non Shrink grout with
    4 x M16 caged Bolts embedded 200mm deep into
    footing.

67
Showroom Bracing
  • 18mm diameter rods for cross bracing.
  • Fixed to columns via 90 x 90 x 10mm angles

68
Showroom Secondary Structure
  • For the Walls of the Showroom, considering the
    outer structure of the showroom is brick veneer,
    we are using Z sections, 102mm deep, 53mm broad
    flange, 49mm narrow flange, 15mm lip depth, and
    1.9mm BMT. This has a section mass of 3.23kg/m,
    according to Stramit Girts and Purlins table.
  • The Girts will span 6000mm, from showroom column
    to column. And will be spaced in accordance with
    the spaning capabilities of the cladding.

69
Showroom Roofing
  • The showroom roofing will be the same as the
    warehouse roofing to maintain looks consistent
    through the buildings.

70
Showroom/Offices cladding
  • BRICK VENEER
  • The cladding for the showroom/offices is brick
    veneer. This was chosen because of the aesthetic
    values which bricks bring to a building. As this
    building represents the company it is important
    to make it stand out.
  • A Hawthorn wirecut brick supplied by Austral
    Bricks will be used.
  • BRICK SPECIFICATIONS
  • Dimensions
  • 290 x 110 x 76mm
  • Compressive strength gt30MPa
  • Breaking Load gt4kN
  • SUB FLOOR VENTILATION
  • Regulations ask that we provide 7300mm² per metre
    of wall length
  • WALL TIES
  • Brick ties will be installed in accordance with
    AS 3700 SAA Masonry Code.
  • FLASHING
  • The flashing material will extend from the bottom
    of the wall panel into the cavity and then be
    built in to the brick work.

Steel framing brick ties
Pictures http//www.bluescopesteel.com.au/index.c
fm/objectID.C6764D08-6DB3-11D4-989F00508BA5461F
71
Showroom Cladding
  • The cladding of the showroom will be made up of
    two parts.
  • The red outline of the showroom to the right
    shows the brickwork cladding to the exterior of
    the building.
  • The Blue outline round the showroom shows the
    walls that will consist of glass. This will be
    6mm Laminated toughened in Lightweight Aluminium
    Sections.

72
Office Construction Showroom
  • As the basic layout of out showroom is an area
    without any intermittent columns, (the roofing
    beams span the whole width), this means that
    there are no internal load bearing walls.
  • Therefore 70 x 45mm studs spaced at 600 centres
    are all thats required. The only loads
    supported is the dead loads of the plasterboard,
    lighting, ventilation, and services.
  • Simple timber framing is used, and 13mm
    plasterboard is glued and nailed to this.
  • The timber walls also allow for the required
    services to be delivered to each office.
  • The Showroom will have Pink Batts of R-Value
    2.0 in the walls and Pink Batts of R-Value 3.5
    in the roof.

73
Office Construction Showroom
  • A suspended ceiling has been constructed
    throughout all the office areas. For this, a
    grid and tile system has been used, with
    aluminium cross brackets holding up foam tiles.
  • The benefit of having suspended ceilings in an
    office is that it provides thermal and acoustic
    insulation, and also allows for future electrical
    modifications to be made. E.g. Extra internet
    cables.
  • The offices have been constructed after the
    subfloor and initial structure has been
    completed.

Source-http//www.steelceilings.com/
Source- http//www.woodgrid.com
74
Showroom flooring
  • Ground Floor
  • The grown floor of the showroom will be a
    display/ showroom area, showing the companys
    products. Since this area is a represents the
    company (i.e. the company image) we will use
    timber floorboards. This provide the room with a
    classy finish.
  • The floorboards sit on 70mm by 35mm F17 seasoned
    hardwood joist that are spaced at 450mm c/c.
    These sit on bearers 20mm by 45mm which then sit/
    are connected to the slab.
  • Upper Floor
  • The upper floor will also be floorboards for
    similar reason. For the client may need to
    present a classy image of the company.
  • The second story is support by 410UB54 steel
    beams that are connected to the portal frame by
    brackets. 150UB14 steel beams run parrel to the
    to the 410UB54 steel beams acting as support for
    the bearers. These 150UB14 beams are spaced at
    1200mm c/c. The bearers will sit on these 150UB14
    beams. They bearers are 2/90 by 45 f17 seasoned
    hardwood, spaning 1200mm and are spaced 1400c/c.
    On these bearers F17 70mm by 35mm floor joist
    sit. They are spaced at 450c/c. Then on these
    floor joist the floorboards are lied down. Secret
    nails will be used nail the floorboards down.
    This is to add to the executive look required.
  • Alternatives
  • When deciding the finishes required for the floor
    carpet was one option considered. This was
    because it posses good thermal and acoustic
    properties. There is also a cost benefit with
    carpet flooring. Although a carpet flooring does
    not really have the aesthetic look the client
    desires.

75
Showroom flooring
  • Supplier BIG RIVER TIMBER FLOORS
  • DIMENSIONS
  • Plank lenghts 2.4m
  • Width 130mm
  • Thickness 14mm
  • TIMBER SPECIES
  • Flooded gum (average density 750kg/m³)
  • The allowable point live load (working stress) of
    Flooded Gum at a thickness of 14mm a stress grade
    of F27 and a span of 450mm is 3.7kn. This meets
    the floor live loading requirements of AS1170.1
  • APPLICATION
  • Floor boards will be joined centrally over the
    floor joists. The butt joints will be staggered
    to produce a random appearance across the floor.
  • Fixing requirements
  • Nail type Machine driven 50 x 2.5mm brad
  • Two nails to be used at each joist
  • Minimum edge distance for nailing of 10-12mm
  • Nails to be punched 2-3mm below board surface

76
Showroom Staircase
  • 6CFW to 6mm brackets.
  • Solid timber treads bolted to the brackets.
  • 12mm thick base and end plates.
  • 2 x M12 chemset anchors to slab
  • Min 25mm of non-shrink grout under plate

77
Wheelchair porch lift
  • A wheelchair porch lift will be installed in the
    showroom/office building so the offices and
    conference room on the second floor can be
    accessed by wheelchairs.
  • The lift will be situated close to the main
    entrance for convenience.

Drawing not to scale
Picture http//www.acessinc.com/wheelchair_porch_
lifts.htm
  • Supplier TRUS-T-LIFT
  • Deck dimensions-
  • Length 1372mm
  • Width 864mm
  • Total width of lift 1219mm
  • Tower dimensions-
  • Tower height3607mm
  • Total travel 3048mm

Porch lift location
First Floor
Ground Floor
78
Disabled Toilet
  • The disabled toilet is located on the ground
    floor of the showroom to allow for easy access.
    The male and female toilets are both suited for
    disabled and non-disabled patrons.
  • Toilets on first floor are located directly above
    the ground floor toilets to minimise plumbing
    costs.
  • The toilet room is 4m² to allow for a wheel chair
    to adequately move.
  • The door way is 0.960m wide to allow for
    wheelchair access.
  • There are two toilets on the first floor, keeping
    in accordance with Australian Standards of one
    toilet for every 20 staff.
  • A DALCO type 18201 hand rail has been installed
    to give wheelchair patients extra mobility as
    well as providing a firm support when using
    fixture.
  • The hand basin is installed at a height of
    0.800m.

79
PARKING REQUIREMENTS
  • 1.5 car spaces needed for every 100m² of floor
    space
  • 1 disabled car space for every 100 normal car
    spaces
  • Normal car park dimensions 2.6m x 4.9-5.4m
  • Disabled car park dimension 3.2m x 4.9-5.4m

80
PARKING ON SITE
  • Floor space area on site 2600m²
  • 39 standard car spaces
  • 2 disabled car space

81
References
  • Block C Notes
  • Building Code of Australia
  • Construction and Structures 2 Lecture Notes,
    Jeremy J. Hamm, 2003
  • Pocket Span Table Book, Timber Promotion
    Council, 2003
  • Steel Line Garage Doors, 2004 Catalogue
  • Stramit 2002 Price and service Guide 2002
  • www.bigrivertimbers.com.au
  • http//www.bluescopesteel.com.au
  • http//www.thomasarmstrong.com.uk
  • http//www.workcover.vic.gov.au/vwa/home.nsf/pages
    /so_construction_attach2/File/Panel_Collapse.pdf
  • http//www.popularmechanics.com
  • http//www.lkgoodwin.com
  • http//www.woodgrid.com
  • http//www.steelceilings.com/
  • http//usmecalux.com/en-US/prodPalletRack.jsp
  • http//houseandhome.msn.com/Improve/LayingCarpet10
    10.aspx
  • http//www.ebuild.com/guide/products
  • http//www.acessinc.com/wheelchair_porch_lifts.htm
About PowerShow.com