ACRP 07-01 New Concepts for Airport Terminal Landside Facilities - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – ACRP 07-01 New Concepts for Airport Terminal Landside Facilities PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 470ac6-MDc2N



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

ACRP 07-01 New Concepts for Airport Terminal Landside Facilities

Description:

ACRP 07-01 New Concepts for Airport Terminal Landside Facilities In association with: Ricondo & Associates, TransSolutions, TranSecure In conclusion, the following ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:1042
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 72
Provided by: cai122
Learn more at: http://www.trbav050.com
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: ACRP 07-01 New Concepts for Airport Terminal Landside Facilities


1
ACRP 07-01 New Concepts for Airport Terminal
Landside Facilities
  • In association with Ricondo Associates,
    TransSolutions, TranSecure

2
RESEARCH
3
Research Methodology
  • Background
  • Research Objective
  • Project Objectives
  • Key Assumptions
  • Research Approach
  • Published Document Review
  • Aviation Industry Interviews
  • Airport Site Visits
  • Approach to Developing New Concepts
  • Passenger Processes
  • Issues Passengers Commonly Face
  • Innovations Identified
  • Concepts Incorporating Innovations
  • Evaluation Process

4
Background
  • Research Objective
  • Develop new concepts that will stimulate design
    innovation for terminal landside facilities at
    FAA-designated large- and medium-hub airports to
    improve passenger accessibility and level of
    service between ground transportation and the
    secure parts of the terminal
  • Project Objectives
  • To develop new concepts for airport terminal
    landside facilities that
  • Improve the passenger experience
  • Stimulate innovative design solutions
  • Address the needs of the elderly traveler
  • Are implementable within a 5-10 year time frame

5
Background
  • Key Assumptions
  • Common-use self-service (CUSS) kiosks will become
    more widely implemented, especially at U.S.
    airports
  • Passengers will be able to tag their own check
    baggage
  • Approximately 80 of the travelling public will
    obtain boarding passes or check their baggage via
    SSDs or the Internet the remainder will use
    full-service functions at the airport
  • Airport operators will take advantage of the
    flexibility to tailor their security programs to
    avoid the 300-foot rule, which bans any
    unauthorized vehicles from parking within 300
    feet of the terminal when the DHS has elevated
    the threat level to orange

6
Research Approach
  • Published Document Review
  • Passenger Satisfaction
  • Aging Passengers
  • Industry Initiatives
  • Wayfinding
  • Passenger Processing
  • Innovative Terminal Design / Future Trends
  • Regional Access to Airports
  • On-airport ground access
  • Public parking

7
Research Approach
  • Aviation Industry Interviews
  • Airport Management
  • Airlines
  • Airport Technology Groups
  • Airport Ground Transportation
  • Key Findings

8
Research Approach
  • Airport Site Visits
  • San Francisco International (CUSS, remote baggage
    check)
  • Heathrow Terminal 5 (Curbside check-in
    operations)
  • Stansted (flexibility, ground transportation
    connectivity)
  • Munich (self-service check-in, curbside
    operations, regional transit connectivity)
  • Vienna International (self-service check-in,
    regional transit connectivity)
  • Hong Kong International (ground transportation
    center)

9
Research Results
  • Key Passenger Processes
  • Key Issues for Passengers
  • Current and Planned Innovations

10
Key Passenger Processes
  • Arriving at the Airport

11
Key Passenger Processes
  • Leaving the Airport

12
Key Issues for Passengers
  • Waiting / Queuing
  • Walking / Vertical Transitions
  • Baggage Handling by Passengers
  • Information / Signage / Wayfinding
  • Vehicular Movement / Pickup / Drop-off
  • Safety and Security

13
Approach to Developing New Concepts
14
Areas of Innovation
  • Common-use Self-service (CUSS)
  • Departures Hall Organization
  • Remote Check-in
  • Alternative Curbsides
  • Elderly Friendly Design
  • Arrival Amenities

15
TERMINAL INNOVATIONS
16
Process-based Departures Hall
DESCRIPTION
  • The implementation of common-use self-service
    (CUSS) allows for the departures hall to be
    separated into three sections based on check-in
    processes rather than airlines. The terminal
    curbside would also be arranged and signed by
    process.

KEY DRIVERS
  • Improve utilization by aggregating demand for all
    airlines versus the peak and valley of an
    individual carriers schedule that results in
    periods of inactivity
  • Resolve issues associated with disproportionate
    relationship between a carriers curbside
    frontage and ticket counter frontage
  • Reduce or even delay major terminal facility
    expansion

17
Process-based Departures Hall
DESCRIPTION
  • The implementation of common-use self-service
    (CUSS) allows for the departures hall to be
    separated into three sections based on check-in
    processes rather than airlines. The terminal
    curbside would also be arranged and signed by
    process.

SIMULATION ANALYSIS
  • Airport A
  • 2 million annual enplanements
  • 560 peak hour originating passengers
  • 45 percent reduction in full-service check-in
    positions
  • Airport B
  • 7 million annual enplanements
  • 2,100 peak hour originating passengers
  • 40 percent reduction in full-service check-in
    positions
  • 30 percent fewer self-service kiosks

18
Self-service Baggage Check
DESCRIPTION
  • Self-service baggage check allows for a one-step
    system where passengers can obtain a boarding
    pass and tag their own bags in one location as
    compared to the current two-step self-service
    check-in system.

KEY DRIVERS
  • Further empower passengers to serve themselves
  • Allow agents to focus on full-service customers
    and provide a higher level of service
  • Improved staff utilization with roaming agents
    in self-service area

19
Self-service Baggage Check
DESCRIPTION
  • Self-service baggage check allows for a one-step
    system where passengers can obtain a boarding
    pass and tag their own bags in one location as
    compared to the current two-step self-service
    check-in system.

EXAMPLES
  • Vienna International Airport
  • Munich Airport
  • Both employ a two-step system with agent-staffed
    baggage drop positions and one-step self-service
    boarding pass and baggage check kiosks

20
Low-profile Passenger Baggage Devices
DESCRIPTION
  • Low-profile passenger baggage devices address the
    issues associated with traditional passenger
    baggage devices by minimizing the distance
    passengers have to lift their baggage onto or a
    ticket counter bag well or of a claim device.

KEY DRIVERS
  • Improved baggage handling for elderly and
    disabled passengers
  • Reduce injuries to agents resulting from baggage
    handling

TICKET COUNTER BAG WELL
BAGGAGE CLAIM
21
Low-profile Passenger Baggage Devices
DESCRIPTION
Low-profile passenger baggage devices address the
issues associated with traditional passenger
baggage devices by minimizing the distance
passengers have to lift their baggage onto or a
ticket counter bag well or of a claim device.
EXAMPLES
  • Low-profile ticket counter bag wells are or will
    be in use at
  • Vienna International Airport
  • DFW Terminal D
  • JFK Terminal 8
  • MIA North Terminal
  • Flat plate baggage devices are often used in
    small hub airports where departures and arrivals
    are on the same level

22
High-capacity Flow-through Elevators
DESCRIPTION
  • High-capacity flow-through elevators are designed
    to operate on a fixed schedule and are intended
    to be in the primary path of travel. They would
    act more like a vertical people mover than a
    traditional elevator.

KEY DRIVERS
  • Improve vertical transitions for the elderly and
    disabled, particularly those with check baggage
  • Ease vertical transitions for passengers using
    baggage carts

23
High-capacity Flow-through Elevators
DESCRIPTION
  • High-capacity flow-through elevators are designed
    to operate on a fixed schedule and are intended
    to be in the primary path of travel. They would
    act more like a vertical people mover than a
    traditional elevator.

EXAMPLES
  • LHR Terminal 5 uses banks of five to transport
    passengers between the transit station and the
    departures level
  • High rise office buildings
  • Subterranean transit stations

24
Consolidated Meeters and Greeters Area
DESCRIPTION
  • Creating a single exit from the secure area to
    the arrivals hall allows for meeters and greeters
    to more easily find their party and creates a
    natural opportunity to provide concessions and
    other amenities, such as baggage carts or
    restrooms.

KEY DRIVERS
  • Recapture the revenue stream from meeters and
    greeters that was lost after September 11, 2001
  • Improves ability of meeters and greeters to
    assist elderly or disabled parties with
    retrieving checked baggage
  • Reduces the number of exits from the secure area
    that have to be monitored by airport or airline
    personnel

25
Consolidated Meeters and Greeters Area
DESCRIPTION
  • Creating a single exit from the secure area to
    the arrivals hall allows for meeters and greeters
    to more easily find their party and creates a
    natural opportunity to provide concessions and
    other amenities, such as baggage carts or
    restrooms.

EXAMPLES
  • International arrivals facilities typically have
    meeters and greeters areas

26
Arrivals Lounges
DESCRIPTION
  • Arrivals lounges provide the same level of
    service to arriving passengers as that provided
    to departing passengers by offering a comfortable
    waiting area and the necessary information to
    ease travelers anxiety.

KEY DRIVERS
  • Improve level of service for arriving passengers

27
Arrivals Lounges
DESCRIPTION
  • Arrivals lounges provide the same level of
    service to arriving passengers as that provided
    to departing passengers by offering a comfortable
    waiting area and the necessary information to
    ease travelers anxiety.

EXAMPLES
  • Tour bus lounges at London Stansted

28
TERMINAL CONCEPTS
29
Terminal Concepts
  • Departures Hall
  • Main Street Check-in
  • Three Lane Check-in
  • Three Stage Check-in
  • Diagonal Check-in
  • Simulation Analysis
  • Arrivals Hall
  • Consolidated Domestic Arrivals Hall
  • Ground Transportation Lounges

30
Main Street Check-in
DESCRIPTION
  • Passengers approaching curbside are offered two
    options (1) direct to SSCP for those who
    obtained boarding passes from a remote kiosk or
    via the Internet (2) all other passengers
    (boarding pass, bag check, full-service).

ADVANTAGES / DISADVANTAGES
  • Very adaptable to existing departures halls
  • Enables clear and effective curbside separation
    with fast-track route to SSCP
  • Help Point acts as a back-up to self-service with
    additional support from full-service counters
  • Longest walk for BP only passengers

31
Three-lane Check-in
DESCRIPTION
Passengers approaching curbside are offered three
options (1) direct to SSCP for those who
obtained boarding passes from a remote kiosk or
via the Internet (2) self-service check-in with
bag drop or, (3) full-service agent positions.
ADVANTAGES/DISADVANTAGES
  • Further separates passengers according to their
    service requirements
  • Enables better distribution of curbside traffic
  • Provides a fast-track to the SSCP
  • Full-service counters do not back up the
    self-service positions
  • Airline support area would be remote from the
    agent positions
  • Longest walk distance for premium passengers
    seeking full-service

32
Three-stage Check-in
DESCRIPTION
All passengers would enter through a single point
and then proceed down a central mall with service
offerings on either side, beginning with
self-service functions for boarding passes and
bag drop, and, finally, full-service counters.
ADVANTAGES/DISADVANTAGES
  • Very intuitive wayfinding through logical
    progression of service offerings
  • Self-service positions are prominent, which would
    encourage their use
  • Full-service functions are a last resort
  • Requires much greater building depth than
    traditionally found in terminal buildings
  • Baggage system costs would be much higher than
    traditional linear arrangements

33
Directional Check-in
DESCRIPTION
  • Variation of traditional European island check-in
    system that provides similar intuitive wayfinding
    as a flow-through arrangement but utilizes a
    traditional linear ticket counter arrangement.

ADVANTAGES/DISADVANTAGES
  • Very logical passenger flow and arrangement of
    service offerings
  • Compatible with many existing departure halls
  • Utilized a traditional baggage conveyor
    configuration
  • Requires relocation of airline support area to a
    remote location

34
Consolidated Domestic Arrivals Hall
DESCRIPTION
  • All domestic arrivals would emerge through a
    well-defined exit into a meeters and greeters
    area similar to an international arrivals
    facility. Amenities could be located adjacent to
    the meeters and greeters area.

ADVANTAGES/DISADVANTAGES
  • Arriving passengers can choose to exit the
    arrivals hall directly or enter the baggage claim
    area
  • Adequate spacing of devices would allow for
    seating for elderly or disabled passengers
  • Arrivals lounges would be available to enhance
    the arrivals experience
  • Entire concept is not very adaptable to existing
    terminals, but pieces could be implemented

35
Arrivals Lounges
INNOVATION
  • An arrivals lounge would provide the same types
    of amenities for passengers waiting for ground
    transportation as departing passengers experience
    in gate holdrooms while waiting to board an
    aircraft.

ADVANTAGES/DISADVANTAGES
  • Real-time information reduces passenger stress
  • Improves passenger safety and security
  • Greatly improves passenger comfort
  • Cost of providing an arrivals lounge could
    outweigh benefits
  • Requires cooperation and support of various
    ground transportation providers

36
LANDSIDE INNOVATIONS
37
Landside Innovations
  • Passenger Processing Facilities
  • Adjacent Passenger Processing Facilities
  • On-airport Passenger Processing Facilities
  • Remote Passenger Processing Facilities
  • Curbside Operations
  • Departures Plaza
  • Remote Departures and Arrivals Plaza
  • Drive-through Self-service Bag Drop Plaza

38
Passenger Processing Facilities
DESCRIPTION
  • The relocation of major passenger processing
    functions commonly located in airport terminal
    landside facilities adjacent to an existing
    terminal, or remote from the airport near a major
    population center.

KEY DRIVERS
  • Need to delay major capital projects required to
    expand the capacity of an existing terminal

39
Passenger Processing Facilities
DESCRIPTION
  • The relocation of major passenger processing
    functions commonly located in airport terminal
    landside facilities adjacent to an existing
    terminal, or remote from the airport near a major
    population center.

EXAMPLES
  • Remote parking baggage check
  • Chicago OHare
  • San Francisco
  • Curbside check-in in adjacent garage
  • Atlanta
  • Curbside, parking, and regional transit in
    adjacent garage
  • Heathrow
  • Remote baggage check and check-in at downtown
    location
  • Vienna
  • Hong Kong

40
Bag Check Plaza
DESCRIPTION
  • Allows passengers to check in for flights, obtain
    boarding passes, and check bags before proceeding
    to parking facility or the curbside.

KEY DRIVERS
  • Need to decrease congestion on the curbside
    roadway and departures hall without increasing
    their physical size
  • Desire to increase customer service

41
Bag Check Plaza
DESCRIPTION
  • Allows passengers to check in for flights, obtain
    boarding passes, and check bags before proceeding
    to parking facility or the curbside.

CONFIGURATIONS
  • Linear Layout
  • Requires less land than parallel layout
  • More difficult to get into and out of open spaces
  • Parallel Layout
  • Bypass lane allow for easy entry and exit
  • Requires multiple bag belts to accommodate
    multiple islands
  • Requires more land than linear layout

42
Bag Check Plaza
DESCRIPTION
  • Allows passengers to check in for flights, obtain
    boarding passes, and check bags before proceeding
    to parking facility or the curbside.

EXAMPLES
  • Hawaiian Airlines Drive-Thru Check-in at Honolulu
    International Airport

43
Bag Check Plaza
DESCRIPTION
  • Allows passengers to check in for flights, obtain
    boarding passes, and check bags before proceeding
    to parking facility or the curbside.

EXAMPLES
  • Aloha Airlines (prior to its cessation of service
    in April 2008) Drive-thru Check-in at Honolulu
    International Airport

44
Bag Check Plaza
DESCRIPTION
  • Allows passengers to check in for flights, obtain
    boarding passes, and check bags before proceeding
    to parking facility or the curbside.

SIMULATION ANALYSIS
  • A medium-hub airport with a high percentage (77
    percent) of POVs
  • 1,200 peak hour enplaned passengers
  • 60 percent of the passengers checking bags
    requires 12 self-service positions
  • 40 percent of the passengers checking bags
    requires 8 self-service positions
  • maximum passenger queues in terminal would be
    reduced by 50 percent or more

45
Supplemental Curbsides
DESCRIPTION
  • Providing a portion, or in the case of a new
    terminal, all of the curbside functions into an
    adjacent parking structure or surface lot.

KEY DRIVERS
  • The need for additional curbside and curbside
    roadway capacity
  • Desire to improve pedestrian safety by reducing
    the number of traffic lanes that passengers must
    cross to access the terminal

46
Supplemental Curbsides
DESCRIPTION
  • Providing a portion, or in the case of a new
    terminal, all of the curbside functions into an
    adjacent parking structure or surface lot.

EXAMPLES
  • LHR Terminal 5
  • Curbsides located in adjacent parking structure
  • SAN Terminals 1 and 2
  • Commercial vehicle curbside located on a portion
    of the surface parking lot adjacent to the
    terminal
  • MUC Terminal 2
  • Forecourts on each side of the terminal building

47
Passenger Assistance Parking Area
DESCRIPTION
  • Dedicated, close-in parking spaces provided free
    of charge, which allows visitors to accompany
    passenger(s) to or from the terminal.

KEY DRIVERS
  • Desire to provide a high level of customer
    service for meeters and greeters and well-wishers
    accompanying an airline passenger to or from the
    terminal

48
Passenger Assistance Parking Area
DESCRIPTION
  • Dedicated, close-in parking spaces provided free
    of charge, which allows visitors to accompany
    passenger(s) to or from the terminal.

EXAMPLES
  • BNA
  • Vehicles pull into spaces where they are allotted
    10 minutes to greet and assist their passengers
  • MUC Terminal 2.

49
LANDSIDE CONCEPTS
50
Landside Concepts
  • Adjacent Passenger Processing Facilities (APPF)
  • Alternatives (5)
  • APPF Concept Example
  • On-airport Passenger Processing Facilities (OPPF)
  • Alternatives (3)
  • OPPF Concept Example
  • Remote Passenger processing Facilities (RPPF)
  • Alternatives (2)
  • RPPF Concept Example

51
APPF Alternative 1
52
APPF Alternative 2
53
APPF Alternative 3
54
APPF Alternative 4
55
APPF Alternative 5
56
APPF Concept Example
DEPARTURES LEVEL
57
APPF Concept Example
ARRIVALS LEVEL
58
OPPF Alternative 1
59
OPPF Alternative 2
60
OPPF Alternative 3
61
OPPF Alternative 3
62
OPPF Concept Example
APM STATION LEVEL
63
OPPF Concept Example
LOWER LEVEL
64
RPPF Alternative 1
65
RPPF Alternative 2
66
RPPF Alternative 2
67
RPPF Concept Example
68
CONCLUSIONS
69
Applicability of Results to Airport Practice
  • Critical Factors for Acceptance by Airport
    Stakeholders
  • Passenger self-tagging requires regulatory
    approval and stakeholder buy-in
  • Common-use technology needs to become
    widely-accepted by both airports and airlines
  • Relocation of curbside functions, particularly
    POV activities, to alternative locations
  • Potential Impediments to Implementation
  • Airport operators decision to avoid the 300-foot
    rules by implementing an approved Bomb Incident
    Prevention Plan (BIPP)
  • Approval to use PFC revenues for improvements to
    customer service
  • Willingness of airlines to relinquish brand
    identity for operational improvements and
    potential cost savings

70
PROJECT TEAM
71
Project Team
  • Senior Program Officer
  • Michael Salamone
  • Project Panel
  • Bruce Anderson, Chair
  • Teresa Davidson
  • Jorge Garcia
  • Karen Scott
  • Prianka Seneviratne
  • Lawrence Smith
  • Christine Gerencher, TRB Liaison
  • Patrick Sullivan, FAA Liaison
  • Research Team
  • Phil Mein, Principal Investigator
  • Andrew Kirchhoff, PM / Terminal Planner
  • Allen Hoffman, Senior Landside Planner
  • Jacob Strawn, Landside Planner
  • Belinda Hargrove, Simulations
  • Art Kosatka, Airport Security Expert
About PowerShow.com