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Guided Reading

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Title: Guided Reading


1
Guided Reading
  • By Katie Alexander
  • Summer 2009

2
What is Guided Reading?
  • A reading strategy that helps students become
    strong independent readers
  • Requires small group instruction
  • Students learn to use various reading strategies
    with teacher support
  • Can be adapted for upper grades

3
Why Guided Reading?
  • Students have a high accuracy rate in reading
    when the proper text is selected for them.
  • Students are provided with the necessary
    strategies to overcome reading road blocks.
  • The focus of reading shifts to meaning rather
    than decoding the construction of meaning is
    imperative.
  • Independent reading and the application of
    independent reading strategies is the goal of
    Guided Reading.

4
Children have an early foundation for reading
text. Marie Clay explains these three sources of
information meaning, structure, and visual
information.
5
How Do I Start ? The Initial Framework for Every
Classroom
  • Students are divided into small groups (ideally,
    4-6 students per group)
  • Lessons will run 15-20 minutes
  • Determine appropriate level of groups
  • Provide a text for each child

6
What Does Small Group Instruction Look Like ?
  • The teacher introduces the text to the small
    group
  • As the text is read aloud or silently, the
    teacher briefly works with students each child
    reads the whole text.
  • The teacher may select one or two teaching points
    to address after reading
  • The students resume reading and apply the
    teaching points presented by the teacher

7
Pre-Reading Activities The TeacherFrom Fountas
and Pinnell
  • Selects an appropriate text, one that will be
    supportive but with a few problems to solve
  • Prepares an introduction to the story
  • Briefly introduces the story, keeping in mind the
    meaning, language, and visual information in the
    text, and the knowledge, experience, and skills
    of the reader
  • Leaves some questions to be answered through
    reading

8
During Reading Activities The TeacherFrom
Fountas and Pinnell
  • Listens In
  • Observes the readers behaviors for evidence of
    strategy use
  • Confirms childrens problem-solving attempts and
    successes
  • Interacts with individuals to assist with
    problem-solving at difficulty (when appropriate)
  • Makes notes about the strategy use of individual
    readers

9
Post Reading Activities The TeacherFrom Fountas
and Pinnell
  • Talks about the story with the children
  • Invites personal response
  • Returns to the text for one or two teaching
    opportunities such as finding evidence or
    discussing problem-solving
  • Assesses childrens understanding of what they
    read
  • Sometimes engages the children in extending the
    story through such activities as drama, writing,
    art, or more reading
  • Sometimes engages the children for a minute or
    two of word work

10
Pre-Reading Activities The StudentFrom Fountas
and Pinnell
  • Engage in a conversation about the story
  • Raise questions
  • Build expectations
  • Notice information in the text

11
During Reading Activities The StudentFrom
Fountas and Pinnell
  • Read the whole text or a unified part to
    themselves (softly or silently)
  • Request help in problem-solving when needed

12
Post Reading Activities The StudentFrom Fountas
and Pinnell
  • Talks about the whole story
  • Check predictions and react personally to the
    story or information
  • Revisit the text at points of problem-solving as
    guided by the teacher
  • May reread the story to a partner or
    independently
  • Sometimes engage in activities that involve
    extending and responding to the text (such as
    drama or journal writing)
  • Sometimes engage in a minute or two of word work

13
How Do I Create Groups ?
  • Groups should be based on assessment results and,
    therefore, based on reading ability.
  • The assessment of students should continue on a
    regular basis to support the re-grouping of
    students based on needs.
  • Groups can be altered and based on interest and
    social interaction.
  • The teachers should group students who use
    similar reading processes and are able to read
    similar level text

14
Forming and Reforming Groups for Guided Reading
This is a continual and repeated process.
15
Assessment
  • Ongoing observations will probably be the most
    beneficial for tracking students.
  • A notebook with Post-It notes can serve as your
    documentation.
  • Running records provide a quick assessment of
    fluency.

16
These are in-the-head strategies that good
readers use. The use of these strategies may be
an unconscious process.
17
What Are the Others Doing?
  • Establishing routines and procedures within your
    class is imperative.
  • Take the time at the beginning of the year to do
    this. In the end, it will prove to be extremely
    beneficial!
  • Utilize any aide or parent volunteer in an
    instructional manner. They should always
    reinforce previously taught material and should
    NEVER introduce new topics.

18
Suggestions for Establishing Procedures
  • Require students to complete the more academic
    centers at the beginning of center time. This
    will encourage them to complete their tasks and
    move on to the fun centers.
  • Keep some basic centers that are always required,
    but allow for some variety of changing centers on
    a weekly basis.
  • Keep a chart or schedule where students can
    easily identify their progress and position
    during center time.
  • Clearly explain directions for new centers. It is
    a great idea to model expectations. Any time
    spent on implementing procedures and routines is
    time well spent!
  • Students should be aware that they must follow
    the assigned schedule. They cannot skip centers.

19
Center Ideas for the Classroom Remember centers
will not change everyday!
20
Center Ideas
  • Visit http//www.readinglady.com for great ideas!
  • http//www.hubbardscupboard.org
  • http//www.msrossbec.com/literacy_index.html

21
Please Visit My Site!
  • The web address is case sensitive.
  • MISS AS READING RESOURCES
  • http//web.me.com/katiealexander515/Site/Welcome.h
    tml

22
Resources
  • Fountas, I.C. Pinnell, G.S. (1996). Guided
    Reading. Heinemann Portsmouth, NH.
  • http//olc.spsd.sk.ca/DE/PD/instr/strats/guided/gu
    ided.html
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