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Outline Motivation and Curriculum Goals Overall Structure of Proposed Curriculum What is in the two new courses? Transition Plan * * Background/Broader Motivation ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Outline


1
Outline
  • Motivation and Curriculum Goals
  • Overall Structure of Proposed Curriculum
  • What is in the two new courses?
  • Transition Plan

2
Background/Broader Motivation
  • Global economy and opportunities.
  • Study abroad.
  • Alternative semesters.
  • Engineering as a liberal arts education.
  • Interdisciplinary/Combine with other disciplines.
  • Other disciplines study engineering minors.
  • Transition to learn how to learn balanced with a
    knowledge of a particular body of knowledge.
  • ECE as a discipline is broader than ever.
  • Sources NAE, Association of American
    Universities, Al Soyster, Provost Director, Other
    Writers, Students, Faculty, Other Curricula.

3
From New York Time Why Science Majors Change
Their Minds (Its Just So Darn Hard) By
CHRISTOPHER DREW Published November 4, 2011
  • Other deterrents are the tough freshman classes,
    typically followed by two years of fairly
    abstract courses leading to a senior research or
    design project. Its dry and hard to get
    through, so if you can create an oasis in there,
    it would be a good thing, says Dr. Goldberg, who
    retired last year as an engineering professor at
    the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    and is now an education consultant. He thinks the
    presidents chances of getting his 10,000
    engineers is essentially nil.
  • In September, the Association of American
    Universities, which represents 61 of the largest
    research institutions, announced a five-year
    initiative to encourage faculty members in the
    STEM fields to use more interactive teaching
    techniques.
  • Literature on USC web site. http//www.ece.neu.edu
    /edsnu/mcgruer/USC/

4
Some Goals of the Revised Curriculum
  • Students understand connections among a broad
    range of Electrical and Computer Engineering
    concepts.
  • Provide early, integrated, hands-on courses to
    motivate students, make connections within ECE,
    help students choose area of focus, and improve
    coop preparation.
  • Not survey courses, real ECE content,
    Sophomore/Freshman year. Provide breadth to the
    ECE curriculum.
  • Ensure depth with level 2 electives.
  • Offer flexibility, including option for an
    alternative semester experience.
  • Students can tailor program to interests.
  • Semester Abroad.
  • Build a curriculum that can be modified easily in
    the future. (Fewer required courses in particular
    semesters.)
  • Reduce of credits.

5
Curriculum Structures
  • Current and Proposed

6
Current Curricular Structure, BSCE
Capstone
ECE Tech. Electives
General Electives
CE Core
Freshman Eng.
Science
Math
Arts, Hum., S.S.
Writing
32 four-credit courses 128 credits 10
one-credit extras 138 credits
7
Possible New Curricular Structure, BSCE
ECE Advanced Elec.
Capstone
ECE Tech. Electives
ECE Level 1 Electives
General Electives
CE Fundamentals
ECE Broad Intro.
Freshman Eng.
Science
Math
Arts, Hum., S.S.
Writing
32 four-credit courses 128 credits ? ECE
Tech. Electives can be EE Fundamentals, Level 1
or Level 2 ECE Electives.
8
Courses in the New Curiculum
9
New BS in ECE
5 General Electives, 2-3 Technical
Electives (Can include CE Fundamentals, Level 1
Electives or Advanced Electives)
Capstone I
Capstone II
2 Capstone
2 Advanced Electives
Electronics II
Wireless Communication
Real Time Embedded Systems
2 Level 1 ECE Electives
Electronics I
Discrete Time Signal Processing
Embedded Systems
Computer Networks
Computer Architecture
Communication Systems
Power and Energy
EE Fundamentals Electromagnetics
EE Fundamentals Cir./Electronics
EE Fundamentals Signals/Systems
ECE Fund. Comp. Organization
CE Fundamentals Algorithms
CE Fundamentals Software
3/6 ECE Fundamentals
2 Broad Introductory
ECE Intro. I Biomedical Circuits and Signals
ECE Intro. II CE, Networks
1 or 2 Freshman Engineering
Freshman Engineering I
Freshman Engineering II
10
Example Broad Introductory ECE Course
  • Biomedical Circuits and Signals

11
Example Unit Electrocardiogram (EKG)
measurements
Students build and test a multi-stage
differential amplifier on a prototyping
breadboard and then measure their own EKG signal
by attaching electrodes to their forearms or chest
To understand the signals, they must first
understand some basic biology. - Anatomy of
the heart - electrophysiology of the heart -
normal and abnormal EKG signals
12
ECE concepts involved in doing this lab
  • How do I isolate and amplify the EKG signal while
    rejecting noise?
  • Operational amplifiers
  • Differential amplifier circuits
  • input/output impedance considerations
  • multi-stage instrumentation amplifier
    configurations
  • common mode rejection ratio
  • Frequency content of the signal
  • Fourier transforms, power spectral density
  • - matching the frequency response of the
    amplifier
  • - Active filters vs. passive filters
  • How do I get the amplified EKG signal into a
    computer?
  • - Embedded systems
  • - Data acquisition, analog-to-digital conversion
  • - Sampling rate, Nyquist rate, ADC bit-depth,
    sources of ADC noise
  • Programming automated data acquisition (Matlab)
  • What information can I extract (process) from the
    EKG signal once I have acquired it?
  • signal filtering
  • automatic extraction of heart rate
  • automatic detection of electrophysiological
    abnormalities
  • such as AV heart block, ectopic beats, flutter,
    fibrillation etc.
  • on (hopefully) simulated data

13
Draft EECE 2408, Biomedical Circuits and
Signals Course Charter
  • A combined lecture/laboratory course in which
    students learn elements of circuit theory, signal
    processing, and MATLAB programming, and apply
    their knowledge to build an EKG system that
    acquires and processes signals from the heart.
  • In the circuits area, the course introduces the
    basic device and signal models and the basic
    circuit laws used in the study of linear
    circuits. The course proceeds to the analysis of
    resistive and complex impedance networks
    including the Thevenin and Norton theorems.
    Op-amp circuits are studied using the ideal
    operational amplifier model with a particular
    emphasis on differential amplifiers and active
    filter circuits.
  • In the signal processing area, the course
    introduces the basic concepts of linearity,
    time-invariance, causality, and stability for
    both continuous and discrete time systems. The
    course proceeds with impulse response and the
    Fourier transform followed by the sampling
    theorem and conversion techniques from analog to
    digital signals. Finally, discrete-time linear
    filter design and application is demonstrated on
    the acquired signals in the MATLAB environment.

14
  • Credit hours 4 SH, Prerequisites GE 1111 or
    Equivalent
  • Textbooks Ulaby and Maharbiz, NTS Press
    Schaums Outline of Signals and Systems 2nd
    Edition, by Hwei Hsu, McGraw-Hill, 2010
  • Optional Reference Books
  • Signals and Systems 2nd Edition, by A. Oppenheim,
    and A. Willsky with S. Nawab. Prentice Hall,
    1997
  • Topics Covered
  • 1. R, L, C, sources, Kirchoffs Laws
  • 2. Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits
  • 3. Complex impedance
  • 4. System properties including linearity, time
    invariance, stability, and causality
  • 5. Impulse response, Fourier Transform, frequency
    response introduction
  • 6. Sampling and interpolation to transition
    between continuous and discrete time
  • 7. Linear filters, design and analysis
  • 8. Basic neuron physiology, sources of
    biopotentials, nervous system organization and
    the cardiac cycle. Analysis of EKG signals.
    Normal and abnormal frequency content of EKG
    signals.
  • 9. Design, build, characterize and test a
    differential amplifier circuit, in the particular
    context of EKG
  • 10. Design signal processing algorithms to
    identify EKG signal features

15
EECE 2409 Smart Home Engineering Course
Charter THIS IS JUST A PROPOSAL!
  • A combined lecture/laboratory course in which
    students learn elements of digital logic design,
    networking, and software design that will enable
    students to build Smart Home subsystems.
  • In the design area, the course introduces the
    basics of combinational and sequential logic,
    including the implementation of finite state
    machines that can control lighting and major
    appliances. The course also introduced
    programming that allows the students to interface
    to the real world and move signals from the
    analog domain to digital environments. Finally,
    the 5-layer network stack model is studied using
    the network home system to explore how to manage
    a distributed network at different levels of
    abstraction. Networking coverage will include
    (need input from networking faculty). The course
    proceeds with connecting subsystems to
    purposefully illustrate the power of subsystem
    specification and system integration.

16
  • Credit hours 4 SH, Prerequisites GE 1111 or
    equivalent
  • Textbooks TBD
  • Optional Reference Books TBD
  • Topics Covered
  • 1. Logic components
  • 2. Truth tables and minimization
  • 3. Complex combination circuits
  • 4. Sequential circuits
  • 5. Finite state machines
  • 6. Software requirements and specification
  • 7. Network programming
  • 8. (4-5 Networking topics)

17
Transition Plan, First Year
  • Teach the Biomedical Circuits and Signals course
    next fall in place of the circuits course.
  • Consequences for the rest of the curriculum
  • Electronics I in 2013 is now circuits and
    electronics.
  • Electronics II will not go quite as far as the
    current Electronics II.
  • More student exposure to MATLAB.
  • More coverage of signals.
  • More student programming experience.
  • Option to teach CE introductory course as
    elective.

18
Transition Plan, Second Year
  • Teach both broad introductory courses.
  • Begin teaching some of the fundamentals courses
    in spring 2014.
  • Full compliment of fundamentals courses fall
    2014.
  • Electives subsequently modified as necessary to
    achieve level 1/level 2 depth.
  • For example, fundamentals of circuits and
    electronics gt electronics gt electronic design.

19
Extra Reference Slides
20
ECE with First Broad Introductory Course in the
Freshman Year
21
Current Curricular Structure, BSEE
Capstone
ECE Tech. Electives
General Electives
EE Core
Freshman Eng.
Science
Math
Arts, Hum., S.S.
Writing
32 four-credit courses 128 credits 10
one-credit extras 138 credits
22
Possible New Curricular Structure, BSEE
ECE Advanced Elec.
Capstone
ECE Tech. Electives
ECE Level 1 Electives
General Electives
EE Fundamentals
ECE Broad Intro.
Freshman Eng.
Science
Math
Arts, Hum., S.S.
Writing
32 four-credit courses 128 credits ? ECE
Tech. Electives can be CE Fundamentals, Level 1
or Level 2 ECE Electives. Probability?
23
New BSEE with one course in Freshman Year
ECE Advanced Elec.
Capstone
ECE Tech. Electives
ECE Level 1 Electives
General Electives
EE Fundamentals 3/6
ECE Broad Intro.
Freshman Eng.
Science
Math
Arts, Hum., S.S.
Writing
32 four-credit courses 128 credits ? ECE
Tech. Electives can be CE Fundamentals, Level 1
or Level 2 ECE Electives.
24
New BS in EE
5 General Electives 2-3 ECE Technical
Electives (Can include CE Fundamentals, Level 1
Electives or Advanced Electives)
Capstone I
Capstone II
Capstone I
Capstone II
2 Capstone
2 Advanced Electives
Electronics II
Electronics II
Wireless Communication
Real Time Embedded Systems
2 Level 1 ECE Electives
Electronics I
Electronics I
Discrete Time Signal Processing
Embedded Systems
Computer Networks
Digital Design
Communication Systems
Power and Energy
3/4 ECE Fundamentals
EE Fundamentals Electromagnetics
EE Fundamentals Cir./Electronics
EE Fundamentals Signals/Systems
ECE Fund. Comp. Architecture
2 Broad Introductory
ECE Intro. I Biomedical ECE
ECE Intro. II Communications ECE
ECE Intro. I Biomedical ECE
ECE Intro. II Communications ECE
1 or 2 Freshman Engineering
Freshman Engineering I
Freshman Engineering II
25
New BS in CE
5 General Electives 2-3 ECE Technical
Electives (Can include CE Fundamentals, Level 1
Electives or Advanced Electives)
Capstone I
Capstone II
Capstone I
Capstone II
2 Capstone
2 Advanced Electives
Electronics II
Electronics II
Wireless Communication
Real Time Embedded Systems
2 Level 1 ECE Electives
Electronics I
Electronics I
Discrete Time Signal Processing
Embedded Systems
Computer Networks
Digital Design
Communication Systems
Power and Energy
ECE Fundamentals Comp. Architecture
CE Fundamentals Algorithms
CE Fundamentals Software
3/3 CE Fundamentals
2 Broad Introductory
ECE Intro. I Biomedical ECE
ECE Intro. II Communications ECE
ECE Intro. I Biomedical ECE
ECE Intro. II Communications ECE
1 or 2 Freshman Engineering
Freshman Engineering I
Freshman Engineering II
26
ABET material, just for reference.
  • Selected sections, see web site for more details.

27
From the Association of American Universities
Five-Year Initiative for Improving Undergraduate
STEM Education DISCUSSION DRAFT Updated October
14, 2011
  • Some important elements of an effective
    analytical framework for assessing and improving
    the quality of undergraduate STEM teaching and
    learning, particularly in the first two years of
    college, as drawn from the literature, might be
  • Developing learning goalsat the module, course,
    discipline, and institutional levels, and
    ensuring that these are linked in a coherent
    fashion and are measurable.
  • Engaging students as active participants in
    learningincluding the use of small group
    activities and other ways of allowing students to
    form learning communities.
  • Providing feedback to students in real-time.
  • Reducing time spent lecturing and increasing use
    of other instructional methodsincluding
    technologies such as clickers and online
    learning, in addition to other kinds of
    activities.
  • Allowing students to engage directly in
    scientific researchopportunities for research
    experience in the first two years may be
    especially important to retention, and such
    opportunities may exist both inside and outside
    the classroom.
  • Developing and utilizing assessment toolsthese
    can be linked back to learning, and ultimately to
    student success, and can be important at the
    level of the individual instructor, department,
    institution, and discipline.
  • o Using scenarios and real-world examples to
    teach concepts and problem-solving skills.
  • o Applying appropriate research techniques to
    teaching (?scientific teaching?)if STEM faculty
    consciously inquire into the effectiveness of
    their own teaching, they can use the information
    they collect to further improve their teaching,
    allowing them to practice scholarship in the
    classroom. This is a core component of the
    activities of the Center for the Integration of
    Research, Teaching, and Learning (CIRTL), an NSF
    center for learning and teaching in higher
    education.
  • o Considering learning at levels other than the
    coursefrom individual learning goals to learning
    modules to series of courses and entire
    disciplinary and institutional curricula, courses
    should not be treated as isolated units, or as
    necessarily the most important units.

28
ABET Curiculum Guidance
  • PROGRAM CRITERIA FOR ELECTRICAL, COMPUTER,
  • AND SIMILARLY NAMED ENGINEERING PROGRAMS
  • Lead Society Institute of Electrical and
    Electronics Engineers
  • Cooperating Society for Computer Engineering
    Programs CSAB
  • These program criteria apply to engineering
    programs that include electrical, electronic,
    computer, or similar modifiers in their titles.
  • Curriculum
  • The structure of the curriculum must provide both
    breadth and depth across the range of engineering
    topics implied by the title of the program.
  • The program must demonstrate that graduates have
    knowledge of probability and statistics,
    including applications appropriate to the program
    name and objectives and knowledge of mathematics
    through differential and integral calculus, basic
    sciences, computer science, and engineering
    sciences necessary to analyze and design complex
    electrical and electronic devices, software, and
    systems containing hardware and software
    components, as appropriate to program objectives.
  • Programs containing the modifier electrical in
    the title must also demonstrate that graduates
    have a knowledge of advanced mathematics,
    typically including differential equations,
    linear algebra, complex variables, and discrete
    mathematics.
  • Programs containing the modifier computer in
    the title must also demonstrate that graduates
    have a knowledge of discrete mathematics.

29
ABET Criteria
Criterion 5. Curriculum The professional
component must include (a) one year of a
combination of college level mathematics and
basic sciences (some with experimental
experience) appropriate to the discipline (b)
one and one-half years of engineering topics,
consisting of engineering sciences and
engineering design appropriate to the student's
field of study. The engineering sciences have
their roots in mathematics and basic sciences but
carry knowledge further toward creative
application. These studies provide a bridge
between mathematics and basic sciences on the one
hand and engineering practice on the other.
Engineering design is the process of devising a
system, component, or process to meet desired
needs. It is a decision-making process (often
iterative), in which the basic sciences,
mathematics, and the engineering sciences are
applied to convert resources optimally to meet
these stated needs. (c) a general education
component that complements the technical content
of the curriculum and is consistent with the
program and institution objectives. Students
must be prepared for engineering practice through
a curriculum culminating in a major design
experience based on the knowledge and skills
acquired in earlier course work and incorporating
appropriate engineering standards and multiple
realistic constraints.
30
Combined ECE Major? What would this look like?
31
Current Curricular Structure, BS EE and CE
Capstone
ECE Tech. Electives
ECE Core
Freshman Eng.
Science
Math
Arts, Hum., S.S.
Writing
32 four-credit courses 128 credits 11
one-credit extras 139 credits
32
Possible New Curricular Structure, BS EE and CE
ECE Advanced Elec.
Capstone
ECE Tech. Electives
ECE Level 1 Electives
General Electives
ECE Fund. 4/6
??
ECE Broad Intro.
Freshman Eng.
Science
Math
Arts, Hum., S.S.
Writing
32 four-credit courses 128 credits ? ECE
Tech. Electives can be EE Fundamentals, Level 1
or Level 2 ECE Electives. 2 EE, 2 CE.
33
Some Questions
  • Do we want EE and CE or ECE? In what form?
  • How do we phase in the changes? Can we pilot the
    first two courses (or maybe just one of them
    freshman year)?
  • What about ABET?
  • When does this happen?
  • When can changes to the freshman year happen?
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