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Twisted Whisker Productions Proudly Presents

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She understood the Fijian culture and ... He was killed just as the debate was heating up once more about pop culture's ... he finds himself in jeopardy when ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Twisted Whisker Productions Proudly Presents


1
Twisted Whisker ProductionsProudly Presents
2
N.D.O.A. 2001 Convention Los Angeles,
California
  • Media Literacy
  • Unplug the Kids

Officer Mark DillonHanford Police Department -
D.A.R.E. Program
3
Media Literacy ?
4
Media -
  • Any means of communication that reaches or
    influences large numbers of people.

5
Literacy -
  • A persons knowledge of a particular subject or
    field.

6
D.A.R.E. Sr. High ProgramMedia Literacy
Definition -
  • The ability to recognize and interpret the
    purpose (why), the content (what) and the
    accuracy (truthfulness) of messages directed to
    specific audiences through various means of
    communication.

7
Media Time Line
  • 45,000 BC Neanderthal carvings on Wooly Mammoth
    tooth, discovered in Hungary
  • 30,000 BC Ivory horse, oldest known animal
    carving, from mammoth ivory, discovered in
    Germany

8
Media Time Line
  • 1895 Marconi sends a wireless Morse Code signal
    2 miles.
  • 1924 Two and a half million radio sets in the
    U.S.
  • 1935 Nielsen's Audimeter tracks radio audiences.
  • 1936 Berlin Olympics are televised closed
    circuit.

9
Media Time Line
  • 1944 Harvard's Mark I, first digital computer,
    put in service.
  • 1951 One and a half million TV sets in U.S., a
    tenfold jump in one year.
  • 1957 U.S.S.R. launches Sputnik.
  • 1967 Pre-recorded movies on videotape sold for
    home TV sets.

10
Media Time Line
  • 1971 Intel builds the microprocessor
  • 1972 "Pong" starts the video game craze.
  • 1981 The laptop computer is introduced.
  • 1987 Half of all U.S. homes with TV are on
    cable.
  • 1989 Pacific Link fiber optic cable opens, can
    carry 40,000 phone calls.

11
Media Time Line
  • 1991 75 of U.S. homes own VCRs fastest selling
    domestic appliance in history.
  • 1991 CNN dominates news coverage worldwide
    during Gulf War.
  • 1993 Demand begins for "V-chip" to block out
    violent television programs.

12
Ever Wonder?
  • Things Hollywood Has Taught Us
  • Major Educators
  • Tube Time
  • Pre-School
  • What about Daddy?
  • 23,000 Vs 11,000

13
My Dog
  • Innocents

14
The Wisdom of Children
  • Strike while the ....

bug is close.
  • Never underestimate the power of ...

termites.
looks dirty.
  • Don't bite the hand that.
  • A miss is as good as a...

Mr.
math.
  • You can't teach an old dog..
  • If you lie down with dogs, you...

will stink in the morning.
  • An idle mind is...

the best way to relax.
  • Where there is smoke, there's..

pollution.
not much.
  • A penny saved is.
  • Two is company, three's..

The Musketeers.
spanked or grounded.
  • Children should be seen and not.

get out of the way.
  • When the blind lead the blind.

punch a 5th grader.
  • Better to be safe than

15
The Question -
  • Does watching violence cause someone to become
    violent?

16
The Real Question -
  • What is the long-term impact on our national mind
    set when millions of children, in their formative
    years, grow up decade after decade bombarded with
    very powerful visual and verbal messages
    demonstrating violence as the preferred way to
    solve problems and normalizing fear and violence
    as the way things are?

17
Martin Tupper
18
Fiji
19
Are you above or below average?
20
(No Transcript)
21
Media Use -
  • By 2003, major companies hope to cover the earth
    with wireless phone and data networks, launching
    nearly 1,000 telecom satellites. (America
    Unwired, 1998)
  • 78 of adults surveyed report that they have home
    cable or satellite television. (National Public
    Radio, 2000)
  • By the year 2003, there will be more than 500
    million Internet users worldwide. (Minneapolis
    Star Tribune, 1999)

22
Tame The Boob Tube
  • Screen Time 35 hours a week595 hours of Tube
    Time Vs. 17 hours of D.A.R.E.
  • How does this effect knowledge or memory of a
    subject?
  • Does the brain ever play tricks on us?

23
Mind Tricks
  • FINISHED FILES ARE THE RE-SULT OF YEARS OF
    SCIENTIF-IC STUDY COMBINED WITH THEEXPERIENCE
    OF YEARS

24
Mind Tricks
  • FINISHED FILES ARE THE RE-SULT OF YEARS OF
    SCIENTIF-IC STUDY COMBINED WITH THEEXPERIENCE
    OF YEARS

25
Memory - Words
26
Memory
  • Sweet
  • Sour Nice Candy Honey Sugar Soda
    Bitter Chocolate Good Heart Taste Cake
    Tooth Tart - Pie

27
Memory Common Cents
28
Memory Common Cents
29
Memory Common Cents
30
The Visual
  • How many of us have seen our students act out
    characters from the screen?

31
The Three Stooges
32
Power Rangers
33
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
34
The Movies
The Program - 1993
35
The Impact
36
MTV
  • Dude This Sucks Show
  • Jackass

37
Body-Slam The Boob Tube
  • A year long study (50 episodes, from 2/12/98 to
    2/1/99) by Indiana University's Department of
    Telecommunication of World Wrestling Federation's
    "Raw is War" recorded instances of sexual and
    violent interactions
  • crotch grabbing or pointing 1,658 instances
    (33)
  • garbage cans, chairs, tables and brooms used in
    wrestling 609 (12)
  • kicks to the groin 273 (5)
  • profane descriptions of people 158 (3)
  • obscene finger gesture 157 (3)
  • simulated sexual activity 128 (2)
  • scantily clad women 70 (1)
  • urinating (talking about/appearing to) 21 (New
    York Times, 1999)

38
Body-Slam The Boob Tube
  • Both WWF - WCW (World Championship Wrestling)
    produce 15 hours of wrestling per week attracting
    15 million viewers, it is estimated that 15 of
    the audience (more than 1 million viewers) are 11
    years old or younger.(U.S. News and World
    Report, 1999)

39
Body-Slam The Boob Tube
40
The Latest Movie
  • The Fast and the Furious

41
The Latest Movie
42
Measuring Impact
  • Gone in 60 Seconds - Touchstone Pictures,
    Subsidiary of Walt Disney

43
Product Placement -Superman
44
Product Placement Superman 2
45
Product Placement- James Bond License To Kill
46
Commercials TV AND ADVERTISING - Michelob
47
Commercials TV AND ADVERTISING - Budweiser
48
Commercials TV AND ADVERTISING - Budweiser
49
Commercials TV AND ADVERTISING - Pella
50
Commercials TV AND ADVERTISING
  • The average American child watches 20,000
    commercials a year. Advertisers spend about 700
    million annually advertising to kids.
  • 96 percent of the food ads on children's
    television are for sugared cereals, candy,
    cookies, and junk food.

51
Commercials TV AND ADVERTISING Cracker Jacks
52
Commercials TV AND ADVERTISING - Heinz
53
Commercials TV AND ADVERTISING
  • Mute the ads
  • Fast-forward the ads
  • Critique the ads
  • See through the ads

54
Questions To Ask About Media Messages
  •  
  • Who is the producer of the message? What is their
    motive?
  • What does the message say? How does it say it?
  • What format does the producer use? (newspaper,
    magazine, TV, Internet, radio, movie, billboard,
    etc.)
  • What are the advantages of the format?
  • What methods/techniques does the producer use to
    make the message believable?
  • Source some of the above is derived from a
    curriculum entitled KNOW TV.

55
Questions to Ask About Media Messages
  • 6. What lifestyle is portrayed in the message?
  • 7. Who makes money from the message?
  • 8. What is left out of the message?
  • 9. Do you agree with the message?
  • 10. What can you do with the information you have
    obtained from the message?Source some of the
    above is derived from a curriculum entitled KNOW
    TV.

56
Watch TV with Your Kids
  • Pay attention to the programs the children are
    watching. Watch some with them.
  • Set limits on the amount of time they spend with
    the television.
  • Point out that although the actor has not
    actually been hurt or killed, such violence in
    real life results in pain or death.
  • Refuse to let the children see shows known to be
    violent, and change the channel or turn off the
    TV set when something offensive comes on, with an
    explanation of what is wrong with the program.
  • Disapprove of the violent episodes in front of
    the children, stressing the belief that such
    behavior is not the best way to resolve a
    problem.
  • To offset peer pressure among friends and
    classmates, contact other parents and agree to
    enforce similar rules about the length of time
    and type of program the children may watch.

57
Silence is acceptanceLet Them Know What You
Think!
Capitol Cities/ABCAudience Services77 W. 66th
StreetNew York, NY 10023
CBSAudience Services524 W. 57th StreetNew
York, NY 10019
NBCAudience Services30 Rockefeller PlazaNew
York, NY 10112
Fox Broadcasting CompanyP.O. Box 900Beverly
Hills, CA 90213
CNNP.O. Box 105366Atlanta, GA 30348-5366
58
Intermission
59
Music
  • Name that Tune

60
Internet
  • An uncontrolled source of information
  • Security of the Net ?
  • WWW - World Wide Web (http)
  • ICQ Instant Message Utility
  • MIRC Internet Relay Chat
  • Napster
  • Gnutella

61
Internet
  • It is estimated that by 2002, 21.9 million
    children (ages five to 12) and 16.6 million teens
    (ages thirteen to 18) will be online. (Barron's,
    1999)
  • Nearly 45 of homes with children ages 12 to 17
    have Internet access. (Horizon Media Research,
    1999)
  • Most children and teens use the Internet for
    e-mailing, search engines, games, music, and
    homework. (Barrons, 1999)
  • 67 of online teens (ages 13 to 18) and 37 of
    online children (ages five to 12) have researched
    product items or bought products online. (eShop
    Weekly, 1999)
  • 52 of those surveyed (between ages of five and
    17) have asked parents to purchase products from
    the Web. (eShop Weekly, 1999)

62
Internet
  • Children between the ages of 5 and 18 will spend
    an estimated 1.3 billion online by 2002.
  • (U.S. News and World Report, 1999)

63
Mind Games
  • 62 of American families have video game
    equipment.
  • Boys ages 8-14 are the target audience. They
    spend more hours playing video games than any
    other segment of the population. 65 of the video
    game market is boys.
  • Boys reported playing video games 9.5 hours per
    week in fourth grade and 5 hours per week in
    eighth grade.
  • Girls reported playing video games 5.5 hours per
    week in fourth grade and 2.5 hours per week in
    eighth grade.
  • Almost 25 of fourth graders reported playing
    more than 10 hours of video games per week.
  • 50 of fourth graders and 75 of eighth graders
    reported some arcade playing each week.
  • Almost 50 of the favorite games chosen by
    children in a study involved fantasy violence or
    human violence.
  • Of 33 popular video games, almost 80 contain
    violence or aggression as part of the play.
  • Only 40 of parents usually look at industry
    ratings before renting of buying computer or
    video games.

64
Mind Games
65
Effects of Video Game Playingon Children the
positive
  • Video game playing introduces children to
    technology.
  • Games can give practice in following directions.
  • Some games provide practice in problem solving
    and logic.
  • Games can provide practice in use of fine motor
    and spatial skills.
  • Games can provide occasions for adult and child
    to play together.
  • User is introduced to information technology.
  • Therapeutic applications with patients.
  • Entertainment

66
Video Games
67
Video Games
68
Effects of Video Game Playingon Children the
negative
  • Games could foster social isolation as they are
    often played alone.
  • Practicing violent acts may contribute more to
    aggressive behavior than passive television
    watching. Studies do find a relationship between
    violent television watching and behavior.
  • Women are often portrayed as weaker characters
    who are helpless and acted upon.
  • Game environments are often based on plots of
    violence, aggression and gender bias.
  • Many games only offer an arena of weapons,
    killings, kicking, stabbing and shooting.
  • Feelings of mastery occur in a world that is not
    real--a video world.
  • More often games do not offer action that
    requires independent thought or creativity.
  • Games can confuse reality and fantasy.
  • In violent games, players must become more
    violent to win.
  • Long-term effect on aggression is not known.

69
Rules of the Screen
  • Turn them off during meal time.
  • Avoid using them as babysitters.
  • Keep the tubes out of their rooms.
  • Know what your kids are seeing.
  • You set the guidelines as to what when.
  • Talk to your child as to what they are watching
    doing.
  • People your kids meet on the internet are
    strangers.
  • E-mail only with permission.
  • Decide as a family whats good and watch it
    together.
  • Patronize good programs / subjects demand more
    of them.
  • Put the family on a Boob-Tube Diet.
  • UNPLUG THE FAMILY!

70
Unplug our Kids!
  • Our world
  • 1st Amendment
  • Media is here to stay
  • Brownies with a difference

71
101 Things a Family Can Do
  • Read the Newspaper
  • Write a Family Letter
  • Put together a Puzzle
  • Collect Stamps
  • Paint a Picture
  • Plan a Fire Safety Exercise
  • Play a Musical Instrument
  • Build a Model
  • Raise a Dog
  • Play the Game - Life

72
101 Things a Family Can Do
  • Find Countries on a Map
  • Do the Dishes by Hand
  • Make a Gingerbread House
  • Play the Card Game Fish
  • Plant a Vegetable Garden
  • Have a Scavenger Hunt
  • Make a Latch Hook Rug
  • A Challenging Chess Game
  • Make Paper Airplanes
  • Raise a Cat

73
101 Things a Family Can Do
  • Draw a Picture
  • Use the Dictionary to Create a Game
  • Tell Stories Under Candle Light
  • Clean the House
  • Teach Respect
  • Plan Prepare for Power Outages
  • Bake Some Cookies
  • Read a Magazine
  • Teach First Aid
  • Start an Aquarium

74
101 Things a Family Can Do
  • Have the Kids Teach a Subject
  • Clean a Room
  • Write a Letter
  • Cut Out a Snow Flake
  • Work on a Crossword Puzzle
  • Plan Prepare for Food Shortages
  • Collect Coins
  • Play a Game of Monopoly
  • Have a Bar-B-Q
  • Have a Big Bubble Blowing Contest

75
101 Things a Family Can Do
  • Teach Honesty
  • Wash the Family Car
  • Bake a Cake
  • Write A Poem
  • Play a Game of Checkers
  • Make Christmas Cards
  • Clean a Drawer
  • Teach Changing a Tire
  • Have a Game of Dominoes
  • Reminisce With Old Photographs

76
101 Things a Family Can Do
  • Solve a Problem Together
  • Dry Some Fruit
  • Plant a Herb Garden
  • Build a Rocket
  • Teach Trustworthiness
  • Play a Game of Clue
  • Plan Prepare for Earthquakes
  • Have a Picnic in the Back Yard
  • Use the Thesaurus to Create Games
  • Teach Fairness

77
101 Things a Family Can Do
  • Write a Song
  • Invite Grandparents over for Dinner
  • Have a Balloon Stomping Contest
  • Solve a Word Search Puzzle
  • Collect Bugs
  • Make Birthday Cards
  • Plan Prepare for Floods
  • Make a Scrap Book
  • Play the Card Game Spoons
  • Plan a Party

78
101 Things a Family Can Do
  • Play the card game Crazy 8s
  • Plant a Flower Garden
  • Make Hand Puppets
  • Have a Puppet Show
  • Teach Caring
  • Paint a Room
  • Plan a Meal
  • Help With Homework
  • Plan Prepare for Water Shortages
  • Take a Walk

79
101 Things a Family Can Do
  • Make a Family Tree Chart
  • Play the Card Game Hearts
  • Collect Rocks
  • Carve a Pumpkin
  • Pull Some Weeds
  • Color in a Coloring Book
  • Plant a Fruit Tree
  • Build a Bird House
  • Clean the Windows
  • Hunt For Easter Eggs

80
The Big Bunny
81
101 Things a Family Can Do
  • Sit Around a Campfire
  • Organize a Closet
  • Build a Dog House
  • Create a Family Skit or Play
  • Have a Fondue
  • Teach Sailor Knots
  • Play Charades
  • Do the Laundry
  • Read a Good Book
  • Read the Good Book

82
101 Things a Family Can Do
  • StartNew Positive Family Traditions

83
Why do we do what we do?
84
This outline may be downloaded at www.sayno.comX
meg Contact Information Mark Dillondare_at_sayno.co
m
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