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NOTICE ME! Understanding Depression and Suicide

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Understanding Depression and Suicide ... 11.5 Caucasian Males 20.5 African American Males 8.4 Caucasian Females ... depression twice as often as boys. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: NOTICE ME! Understanding Depression and Suicide


1
NOTICE ME! Understanding Depression and Suicide
  • Summit County Suicide Prevention Coalition
  • Summit County ADM Board
  • Andrea Denton
  • September, 2011

2
WHY ARE WE HERE?
  • We care about what is happening to our
    community.our families and our friends.
  • We dont want any more tragedies.
  • We want to make a difference.

3
AND BECAUSE
  • We are some of the people that others look up to
    for answers when life is confusing.
  • We are trying to figure out why someone would
    find life so painful that death becomes the way
    to resolve the situation.

4
WHAT WE HOPE TO LEARN
  • The impact of suicide within the community.
  • The connection between depression and suicide
  • The myths and misconceptions about suicide.
  • The risk factors and signs of suicidal behavior.
  • Finding help for those at risk.

5
A BASIC UNDERSTANDING
  • Many people are uncomfortable discussing suicide.
  • We fear the topic.
  • We dont understand it
  • BUT, KNOWLEDGE IS POWER!
  • The more we knowthe more we can help.

6
OUR LANGUAGE MATTERS
  • We can take the judgment out of our language by
    using phrases like
  • died by suicide
  • death by suicide
  • completed suicide
  • Instead of saying committed suicide

7

A PERSPECTIVE ON SUICIDE
  • It ranks 11th as a cause of death in America.
  • As many as 25 of adolescents and 15 of adults
    consider suicide at some point in their lives.
  • More people die using firearms than by any other
    method.

8
  • A suicide attempt is a desperate cry for help to
    end hopelessness and excruciating, unending, and
    overwhelming pain.
  • Suicidal people dont necessarily want to die.
    They want their pain to end.

9
IS SUICIDE REALLY AN ISSUE?
  • 94.8 people die by suicide every day in the U.S.
  • 34,598 people died of suicide in 2007 in the U.S.
  • 65 people died of suicide in Summit County in
    2010.
  • Nationally, one person dies of suicide every 15.2
    minutes.

10
THE SIZE OF THE PROBLEM
  • These statistics are the best we have, but there
    may be as many as 2 to 3 times more people who
    complete suicide than are reported.
  • For every 1 homicide, 2 people complete suicide.

11
U.S. SUICIDE STATISTICS - 2007
  • Rates per 100,000
  • National Average 11.5
  • Caucasian Males 20.5
  • African American Males 8.4
  • Caucasian Females 5.4
  • African American Females 1.7
  • Elderly (65 years) 14.3
  • Children (5-14) .5
  • Youth (15-24) 9.7

12
GENDER ISSUES
  • Females
  • Make attempts 4 times as often as men.
  • Their risk rises until midlife, then decreases.
  • Males
  • Complete suicide 4 times as often as women.
  • Their risk is always higher than women and
    continues to rise until end of life.

13
  • WHY THE DIFFERENCE?
  • Could it be that
  • Females are more likely to seek help?
  • Females are more likely to talk about feelings?
  • Males suffer from depression silently?

14
DEPRESSION AND SUICIDE
Their Relationship..
15
THE STORY
  • It is estimated that as many as 90 of suicidal
    people suffer with a depressive illness, either
    diagnosed or undiagnosed.
  • Upon reaching puberty, statistics show girls are
    affected by clinical depression twice as often as
    boys. However, some feel that perhaps boys are
    just not diagnosed as quickly or easily.

16
FAULTY WIRING
  • Just as a person with diabetes has low insulin
    production, a person with depression suffers from
    the minds inability to function correctly.
  • Depression and stress can cause changes in the
    physical structure of the brain and damage to
    brain cells.
  • The symptoms of depression can be mild to severe
    for any individual person.

17
SUICIDE HAS BEEN VIEWED AS
  • A moral failing
  • A spiritual weakness
  • The cowards way out
  • A selfish act
  • But, after years of brain research, we now know
    that the symptoms of depression have a biological
    basis.

18
TREATMENT FOR DEPRESSION
  • Medications help to repair the damage to nerve
    connections. It may take 4 to 6 weeks for them
    to be effective.
  • Counseling helps to teach new coping and
    problem-solving skills and different ways to
    interpret stressful events. Counseling can change
    negative ways of thinking that can lead to
    suicidal thoughts.

19
  • For most people, the best treatment is medication
    and counseling combined.
  • Some people can also benefit from group therapy,
    support groups and other social supports.
  • Treatment is designed specifically for the
    individual.
  • Watch the person carefully for at least six
    months.

20
WITHOUT TREATMENT?
  • Risk of increased alcohol and drug use.
  • Significant relationship issues.
  • Lost school days or work days and inability to
    plan for future.
  • Higher risk for suicidal thoughts, attempts and
    death.

21
WHAT DO WE WATCH FOR?
  • Depressed or Irritable Appearance
  • Frequent crying
  • Unhappy presentation
  • Angry outbursts
  • Wears dark or monotone clothing
  • Writes, reads or listens to music with violent or
    depressive themes
  • Truancy becomes a problem

22
AND
  • Withdrawal from favorite activities or people
  • Changes in friends
  • Poor hygiene
  • Moves more slowly or cant sit still
  • Rapid changes in weight
  • Changes in sleeping habits
  • No energy to manage duties
  • Physical complaints
  • Inability to concentrate

23
MORE PROBLEM BEHAVIORS
  • Acting out a will
  • Talking about death and dying
  • Making verbal threats Im no good to anyone
    I cant go on without____ I wish I were dead.
  • Looking for methods, weaponscreating a plan.

24
LISTEN!
  • What is wrong with______? He or she seems so
    different from the way they used to be.
  • If this happens, look at the patterns of behavior
    and see what your gut reaction tells you.

25
BE ESPECIALLY WORRIED IF
  • The person made a prior suicide attempt.
  • They lost someone to suicide.
  • They are using or abusing substances.
  • They have had a recent loss (relationship, family
    death, job, pet, freedom).
  • They are in trouble anywhere.

26
OR
  • They are struggling with sexual orientation
    issues.
  • Four times higher risk for suicide than their
    heterosexual peers
  • More frequent and more lethal suicide attempts
  • Significantly higher rates of depression,
    substance abuse and suicidal ideation

27
OR
  • They have an illness that makes them feel
    different, especially if it is newly diagnosed.
  • They express hopelessness about life.
  • They are in emotional pain and cant see that
    things will improve.

28
  • RISK FACTORS
  • AND PROTECTIVE
  • FACTORS

29
RISK FACTORS
  • GENETICS
  • Depression can run in families.
  • A family history of suicide increases risk by 6
    times.
  • ENVIRONMENT
  • People are affected by psychological trauma,
    abuse, chronic illness, medications or the
    problem-solving techniques of others.
  • SITUATIONAL FACTORS
  • Violence, illness, sudden loss or any severe
    shock to the system can bring on suicidal
    feelings.

30
  • MORE SITUATIONAL FACTORS
  • Substance use
  • Access to firearms or other lethal means
  • Significant loss (like death, separation,
    divorce, break up, etc.)
  • Social isolation, feeling alone or picked on.
  • Feeling trapped or like a burden
  • History of violence, aggression or impulsiveness

31
PROTECTIVE FACTORS
  • Restricted access to lethal means.
  • Support of family and friends.
  • Having coping skills
  • Community support like belonging to church,
    groups or organizations.
  • Ongoing medical and/or mental health care
    relationships.

32
AND
  • Beliefs that discourage suicide and support
    self-preservation
  • Future plans sees self in the future
  • Sense of purpose
  • Is ambivalent (struggling with whether to live or
    die)
  • Is able to connect with people and seek help

33
MYTHS AND FACTS
34
MYTHS AND FACTS
  • Sorting out the truth..
  • Knowing what to believe..
  • Sharing your expertise

35
FACT vs. MYTH
  • MYTH A person who threatens suicide wont
    really follow through.
  • FACT Almost 80 of people who complete suicide
    have talked about it with someone before they die
    by suicide. Students are particularly good at
    sharing with friends so friends need to be told
    to not keep someones suicidal feelings a secret.

36
FACT vs. MYTH
  • MYTH No one I know would do that.
  • FACT Suicide is an equal opportunity killer.
    Rich, poor, successful, unsuccessful, beautiful,
    ugly, young, old, popular, and unpopular people
    all die of suicide.

37
FACT vs. MYTH
  • MYTH Once a person decides to die nothing can
    stop them. They really want to die.
  • FACT Most people actually want to be stopped.
    Most individuals want to end the pain, not their
    lives. They often feel there is no hope.

38
FACT vs. MYTH
  • MYTH Asking someone if they are suicidal might
    cause a person to think about suicide or to
    attempt suicide.
  • FACT It is helpful to talk openly with someone
    who is having suicidal thoughts. Many people are
    relieved at the chance to talk about the
    thoughts. You will not put the idea of suicide
    into someones head.

39
FACT vs. MYTH
  • MYTH
  • They are just trying to get attention.
  • FACT
  • They are trying to get help. We must recognize
    that need and respond to it.

40
AMBIVALENCE
41
IM NOT A PSYCHIATRIST
  • WHAT CAN I DO?

42
WHAT CAN I DO?
  • Think of depression as an illness, like heart
    disease.
  • Try to understand that the person is feeling
    serious pain.
  • Think of suicidal thoughts as a crisis in that
    illness, like a heart attack.

43
WHAT IF
  • We werent afraid to ask for help for ourselves
    and the people we care about?
  • We no longer had to feel ashamed of feelings of
    despair and hopelessness, but recognized them as
    symptoms of a brain disorder?

44
WHY DONT WE HELP?
  • Most of us are afraid of getting a yes answer
    if we ask about suicide. We think we dont know
    how to help.
  • Some of us believe that suicide and depression
    are not our business or responsibility.
  • Remember that most suicidal people are very
    ambivalent. They want help for the pain but
    dont know how to ask for it.

45
A METHOD WE CAN USE
  • Dr. Paul Quinnett suggests learning QPR, similar
    to CPR
  • Question
  • Persuade
  • Refer
  • for those times when we realize that someone
    needs help for dealing with their pain but they
    dont know how to ask for it.

46
ASK QUESTIONSBE CURIOUS
  • You seem pretty down today.
  • Do things seem hopeless to you?
  • How do you plan to deal with your problem?
  • Are you thinking about suicide?
  • If you get a yes answer, ask more questions.

47
HOW MUCH RISK IS THERE?
  • To find out if the person is in immediate danger.
    Ask or think about
  • Has the person attempted suicide before?
  • Does the person have a plan?
  • How specific is the plan?
  • Does the person have access to means of suicide?

48
DO
  • Do remain calm, relaxed and rational.
  • Do look and listen for warning signs and get help
    early.
  • Do get involved and stay involved.
  • Do talk openly about suicide and encourage
    expression of feelings.
  • Do get the person to explain what hurts so badly.

49
DO
  • Do listen with empathy show interest and
    support.
  • Do take action and remove means.
  • Do offer hope that alternatives are available.
  • Ask if they ever felt like this before and how
    they got through that situation.

50
DONT..
  • Dont make moral judgments.
  • Dont argue, lecture, or encourage guilt.
  • Dont be sworn to secrecy or make promises you
    cant keep.
  • Dont offer empty reassurances (Youll get over
    this).

51
  • Dont minimize the problem (All you need is a
    good nights sleep).
  • Dont keep the information secret.
  • Dont dare or use reverse psychology.
  • Dont leave the person alone.

52
Never Go It Alone
  • Collaborate With Others
  • Family/friends
  • School personnel
  • Emergency room staff
  • Law enforcement
  • Family doctor
  • Mental health professionals
  • Clergy
  • Crisis hotlines

53
Community Resources
  • Know how and where to get help before a crisis
    happens. Have a resource list.
  • Find out who to go to in your agency or school.
  • Refer the person for professional help and help
    them get there.
  • For immediate danger, call 911 for help from the
    police and/or paramedics.
  • Ask if there is a Crisis Intervention Team (CIT)
    officer available.

54
  • If person is not in immediate danger and can be
    safely transported, take them to
  • Childrens Hospital Medical Center (under age 18)
  • Any hospital emergency room or Portage Path
    Emergency Services (over age 18)
  • For guidance and support crisis hotlines (24/7)
  • SUPPORT Hotline (Summit County) (330) 434-9144
  • Lifeline (From Anywhere) (800)
    273-TALK
  • PIRC Program (Childrens Hospital) (330)
    543-7472

55
FINAL THOUGHTS
  • You may know people with depression.
  • Have an open discussion about depression and
    suicide. Invite them to talk.
  • You would perform CPR if you saw a heart attack
    victim, remember QPR for suicide emergencies.
  • Dont be afraid to interfere when someone is
    dying more slowly of depression.

56
BECAUSE OF YOUR POSITION
  • You might be the only person who recognizes that
    a person needs help.
  • Follow your gut reaction.
  • Help reduce the stigma placed on mental illness,
    suicide and depression.
  • Be aware of your own vulnerability to depression.

57
  • THE MOST IMPORTANT THING YOU
  • CAN DO
  • IS TO INSTILL A FEELING OF HOPE
  • THAT THE PERSON WILL
  • GET THROUGH THIS ROUGH TIME.

58
  • A PERSON MAY NEVER HAVE EXPERIENCED A DIFFICULT
    TIME PREVIOUSLY AND SO THIS MAY FEEL LIKE THE
    END OF THE WORLD.
  • DONT LET IT BE.

59
  • THANKS SO MUCH FOR ALL YOU DO
  • EVERY DAY TO MAKE THIS A BETTER
  • WORLD FOR PEOPLE IN THESE
  • TURBULANT TIMES.
  • The world is a better place because you care.
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