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Professional Learning Communities

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Title: Professional Learning Communities


1
Professional Learning
Communities
At work within our organization
Imperial County Office of Education Special
Education Staff Development 2006-2007 Day 1
2
SUMMER FUN
  • How much fun did you have?
  • 1. Not enough!
  • 2. Enough to carry on . . .
  • 3. Makes me smile.
  • 4. What goes on the road stays on the
    road!
  • How much fun did you have?

3
I hope that I die in a workshop
because the transition from life to death will be
so subtle.
4
Results from Needs Survey
  • Team Building
  • Challenging Behaviors
  • Dealing with difficult people
  • Communicating with parents
  • Curriculum specific (e.g. reading, science,
    transition)

5
  • Creating a
  • Professional Learning Community
  • is a journey...

6
It begins with a shared understanding of where
you want to go, together,
7
and is fueled by a continuous process of
building the skill and the will to share
responsibility for the success of all learners.
8
PURPOSE
  • To support increases in student learning by
    developing knowledge, tools, and skills to
    increase our capacity as a learning organization
    through the development of Professional Learning
    Communities.

9
OBJECTIVES
  1. Understand the concept and attributes of a
    professional learning community.
  2. Examine research-based best practices and
    standards for becoming a professional learning
    community.
  3. Experience and create sample processes and
    products reflective of professional learning
    communities.
  4. Acquire strategies and tools for designing,
    implementing, and evaluating a schools journey
    towards becoming a professional learning
    community.
  5. Design a plan of action for implementing the
    professional learning community concept.
  6. Apply new learning to our unique Special
    Education settings.
  7. Participate actively by engaging in conversations
    and teamwork.
  8. Reflect on and self-assess personal knowledge,
    skills, and beliefs.

10
In order to know what I
think, I have to write and see what I
say. Roland Barth

11
Reflection
  • What are my learning goals for my participation
    the next 3 days of staff development?

12
DESIRED OUTCOMES
  • Shared understanding of the critical
    characteristics of a professional learning
    community (PLC)
  • Insights into shifting school culture to a focus
    on learning
  • Assessment of current reality and identification
    of needs/interests for next steps
  • Enthusiasm for becoming a PLC!

13
Day One Agenda
  • Communication Strategies/Dealing with Difficult
    People Kim Scott
  • Staff Development Foundations Purpose,
    Objectives, Norms
  • WHAT is a PLC?
  • IS 100, 700, Intro, and Bonus

14
Getting Acquainted
  • Introduce yourselves.
  • What do you all have in common AND will
    cause you to be unique in the room?
  • Share your learning goals for your
    participation in the next 3 days of staff
    development.

15
NORMSThe standards of behaviors
by which we agree to operate while we are in this
group
16
NORMS for LEARNING
  • Listen through the filter of a question.
  • Share experiences to enrich others.
  • Set aside preconceived notions.
  • Pay attention to your feathers the Ahas you
    experience.
  • Learn by doing apply to your own work.
  • Respect the 100 Mile Rule.
  • Respect yourself and your colleagues.

17
LEARNING BUDDIES
  • 1 ________________________
  • 2 ________________________

18
P PROFESSIONAL L LEARNING C COMMUNITY
19
With your Learning Buddy 1
  • Brainstorm a definition for each term.
  • What is your synthesis of the whole?
  • Use Handout 9.

20
P PROFESSIONAL
Educators using standards and research as the
basis for collaborative investigation of how to
better achieve their goals.
21
L LEARNING
Ongoing study and constant practice based on a
commitment to continuous improvement.
22
C COMMUNITY
An environment that fosters mutual cooperation,
emotional support, and personal growth to achieve
collectively what no one can achieve alone.
23
R E S E A R C H
24
With your Learning Buddy 2
  • Read Introduction to Professional Learning
    Communities at Work Handout pg. 10
  • Share your feathers and their importance or
    impact on you.

25
The most promising strategy for sustained,
substantive school improvement is building the
capacity of school personnel to function as a
professional learning community. The path to
change in the classroom lies within and through
professional learning communities.
Milbrey McLaughlin
26
FUNDAMENTAL ASSUMPTIONS
  • We can make a difference our organization can
    become more effective.
  • People improvement is the key to organizational
    improvement.
  • Significant organizational improvement will
    impact student achievement.

27
Getting Ready for Lunchtime!
28
Emergency Responder Training
  • IS 100, 700, Intro, and BonusTraining

29
Feedback please . . . Turn in to IVCEC
or ICOE Sp. Ed. Office by 330 today.
30
Plan for Next 2 Days
  • Day 2
  • Share results of feedback
  • Characteristics of PLCs
  • Where are we as an organization?
  • Culture is key (Learning versus Teaching
    Organization)
  • Group versus Team
  • Day 3
  • Communication/Team Building with classified staff
  • PM Classified Emergency Responder Training
  • PM Certificated PLC Teams moving forward

31
Lunchtime!
32
Professional Learning
Communities
Welcome back!
At work within our organization
Imperial County Office of Education Special
Education Staff Development 2006-2007 Day 2
33
The whole is never the sum of the parts
it is greater or
lesser, depending
on how well the
individuals work
together.
Chuck Noll
34
PSYCHO-GEOMETRICS
  • Which shape appeals to you most?

BOX TRIANGLE RECTANGLE CIRCLE
SQUIGGLE
35
DESIRED OUTCOMES
  • Shared understanding of the critical
    characteristics of a professional learning
    community (PLC)
  • Insights into shifting school culture to a focus
    on learning
  • Assessment of current reality and identification
    of needs/interests for next steps
  • Enthusiasm for becoming a PLC!

36
Feedback from Day One
  • Number of Responses 35 Average 4.04 Range 2 - 5
  • FOUND USEFUL
  • Communication with difficult people/understanding
    filters/own personality profiles
  • First Responder Segment
  • Group work discussing PLC
  • Logical sequence to build knowledge
  • Concept as a whole group we can make a
    significant difference in student learning
  • IMPROVEMENTS
  • Nothing (great movement\games\interaction)
  • Better speakers
  • More active participation for Emergency Responder
    Training
  • Some practice in questioning and
    listening/scenarios related to difficult people
  • Hearing more of others learning objectives
  • Develop trust building to encourage honest
    reflection
  • More team building/collaborative activities
  • RECOMMENDATIONS
  • More coffee/A W Root cream soda
  • More group participation
  • Prep time

37
Day Two Agenda
  • Welcome Back!
  • Characteristics of PLCs
  • Assessment of PLC Reality
  • What are we a learning or teaching organization?
  • Boosters/Barriers
  • Group versus Team
  • Wrap-up

38
NORMS for LEARNING
  • Listen through the filter of a question.
  • Share experiences to enrich others.
  • Set aside preconceived notions.
  • Pay attention to your feathers the Ahas you
    experience.
  • Learn by doing apply to your own work.
  • Respect the 100 Mile Rule.
  • Respect yourself and your colleagues.

39
LEARNING BUDDIES
  • Triad
  • 3 ________________________
  • 3 ________________________
  • 4 ________________________
  • 5 ________________________

40
BIG IDEAS of a Professional Learning Community
  1. Learning focus
  2. Collaborative teams
  3. Governed by results

41
KEY QUESTIONS
  • If we believe all students can learn ...
  • What is it we expect them to learn?
  • How will we know when they have learned it?
  • How will we respond when they dont learn?
  • What will we do if they have already learned it?

42
Characteristics of a Professional Learning
Community
  1. Shared mission, vision, values, goals
  2. Collaborative teams
  3. Collective inquiry
  4. Action orientation/experimentation
  5. Commitment to continuous improvement
  6. Results focus

DuFour and Eaker
43
With Learning Buddies Triad 3
SAY SOMETHING
  1. Chunk the text into the same number of pieces as
    you have group members. Text Leading edge
    Collaboration lite puts student achievement on
    a starvation diet (Handouts Pages 19-22)

2. Designate a conversation initiator for each
chunk.
  1. Everyone reads the first chunk. When everyone is
    finished reading, person 1 begins a brief
    conversation with a comment or question.
  1. Repeat the process until all text has been read
    and discussed.

44
CHARACTERISTICS of a PROFESSIONAL
LEARNING COMMUNITY
What would these characteristics look like in
your school?
45
If YOU build it, they will not come.
-- Rick DuFour
46
(No Transcript)
47
  • People must learn themselves through change.
  • Linda Lambert, Author
  • Building Leadership Capacity in Schools (ASCD)

48
PLC
Self Assessment
49
PLC Reality Assessment
  • Complete Self Assessment
  • Take 6 dots from table and during Stretch Break
    place one dot on each of the 6 charts reflecting
    self-assessment results.

50
Stretchbreak!
51
The real voyage in discovery consists not in
seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.
Marcel Proust
52
Despite over 30 years of research establishing
that what happens in a school affects student
learning, and despite chanting We believe all
kids can learn until it has become a cliché,
many educators remain unwilling to accept
responsibility for student learning. They
believe that the major influences on learning are
found outside the school environment. They argue
that students learn because of their homes,
parents, peer groups, innate abilities, and so
forth, and that there is little schools can do to
overcome those external influences.
53
Part I
  • How does the school respond when it becomes
    apparent that the student is not succeeding?
  • What message is the school sending to Johnny?
  • How would you describe the schools culture?
  • What are the assumptions, beliefs, expectations,
    habits, and values that seem to drive its day-to
    day work?

54
The Schools Response There is no consistent,
systematic response from the school when it
becomes apparent that a student is not
succeeding. The school does not respond.
Individual teachers are on their own in deciding
the appropriate response to the student, and they
respond in very different ways.
55
The Schools Message The message from the
school is one of detachment. The student is
given choices and advised he will be held
accountable for his decisions. The school seems
to say, You can elect to learn or elect to fail,
choose to complete work or choose to get zeros,
choose to obey the rules of the school or choose
to be punished, choose to participate in school
activities or choose to remain a loner. We will
demonstrate little interest in the choices you
make other than to hold you accountable for them.
56
Assumptions Driving the Culture of the
School The fundamental purpose of our school is
to provide students with the opportunity to
learn. We fulfill our responsibilities when we
provide students with clear lessons and
opportunities to demonstrate their learning. If
students fail to take advantage of the
opportunities they are provided, they must suffer
the consequences of their decisions.
57
Part II
  • What is the same in Part I Part II? What is
    different?
  • How does the school respond when it becomes
    apparent that the student is not succeeding?
  • What message is the school sending to Johnny?
  • How would you describe the school culture? What
    are the assumptions, beliefs, expectations,
    habits, and values that seem to drive its
    day-to-day work?

58
The Schools Response
  • Provides the student with increasing levels of
    time and support when he experiences difficulty
  • Is timely (every 3 weeks) and systematic. The
    structured process for monitoring each students
    learning and responding to those experiencing
    difficulty does not rely on the discretion of the
    individual teachers.
  • Is directional rather than invitational.
    Students are not invited to seek help but are
    required to get additional help.

59
The Schools Message Learning is required.
You can and will be successful here. You may not
choose to fail. We want to connect with you
through people who care about you. We want you
to feel connected, get involved, and be
successful.
60
Assumptions Driving the Culture of the Second
School The fundamental purpose of the school is
to ensure student learning. All of our
practices, policies, and procedures must be
assessed on the basis of their impact on
learning. We can help students be successful.
Our collaborative efforts do have an impact on
student learning.
61
Second School
First School
62
Second School
First School
63
With job-alike colleagues
  • How does your school respond when it becomes
    apparent that a student is not succeeding?
  • What message is your school sending to students
    like Johnny?
  • How would you describe the culture of your
    school?
  • What steps might you take to re-culture your
    school in support of student learning?

64
Job Alike Teams
  • MD
  • Sheri Huerta, Susana Amezcua, Yolanda Velaquez,
    Manuel Perez, and Melinda Lydick
  • Infant
  • Laura Perez, Elsa Camacho, Margarita Ortega, and
    Pam Mills-Morita
  • Preschool
  • Susan McKenzie, Lisa Garduno, Yvonne Salgado, and
    Speech/Language
  • Early Elementary
  • Lisa Soto, Marisela Garcia, Francisco Nunez,
    Araceli Garcia, and DIS or Administration
  • Upper Elementary
  • Rosie Chew, Vanessa St. John, Robert Willingham,
    Veronica Gonzalez, Joshua Scott, and DIS or
    Administration
  • Jr. High
  • Maribel Salcedo, Brian Stokely, Matilde Gonzalez,
    Gerry Luevano, and DIS or Administration
  • High School/ Adult Life Skills
  • Danny Valadez, Susan McBrine, Arthuro Magallanes,
    Liz Willingham, Anita Salcido, Janet Otter, and
    DIS or Administration
  • Deaf/Hard of Hearing
  • Mila Dizon, Alex Garcia, Karina Cortez, and DIS
    or Administration

65
Lunchtime!
66
Where are we now?
Collaborative Teams (We)
Cooperative Groups (III)
Entrepreneurial, Competitive (I, me)
67
Carousel Brainstorm
  • Brainstorm boosters in place
  • that will help move PLCs forward.
  • Brainstorm barriers to PLCs progress.
  • Brainstorm action steps to addess the most urgent
    barrier.

68
Force Field Analysis
  • Force Field Analysis is a process that allows
    groups to analyze the current situation by
    looking at the factors that are inhibiting,
    blocking, or standing in the way of success while
    simultaneously identifying those factors that are
    assisting, enhancing, or supporting success.
    This strategy was pioneered by Kurt Lewin, who is
    credited with being the father of the group
    dynamics movement.
  • Step 1
  • The facilitator states the current situation so
    that all members understand it. Write goal for
    current situation on the top of a chart so all
    members can see it.
  • Step 2
  • Members are asked to identify those factors of
    forces that are enhancing or supporting the
    change in the current situation. These are
    listed on the left hand side of the chart and are
    referred to as the enhancing or driving forces.
  • Step 3
  • The group then lists those forces or factors
    which are blocking the desired change or
    achievement of the goal. These are the
    restraining or inhibiting forces. They are
    listed on the right hand side of the page.
  • Step 4
  • The group might further determine the relative
    intensity of each force by giving the forces a
    numerical weight. On each side, the total value
    should equal 100. The group might determine
    that one restraining force accounts for 50 of
    the blocking in achieving its goal. The group
    might further determine that another force might
    account for 70 of the enhancing or driving force
    that is spurring the group toward achieving its
    goal.
  • Step 5
  • After doing this type of assessment or diagnosis
    of the situation, the group will examine the
    forces to determine how it can minimize some of
    the most powerful restraining forces and promote
    more of the driving forces. The group might
    discuss how to weaken the restraining forces and
    how to enhance the driving forces to achieve its
    goal. Essentially develop an action plan to move
    our organization forward to meeting goals.
    Identify spokesperson to share summary with the
    whole group.

69
(No Transcript)
70
Reflection
  • Am I a member of a group or a TEAM?
  • What is my evidence?

71
With your Learning Buddy 4
  • Share with each other opportunities you have had
    to participate in a group or team.
  • What evidence do you have to make the
    differientiation?

72
DIMENSIONS of SUCCESS
RESULTS
PROCESS
RELATIONSHIPS
Interaction Associates, LLC
73
The task at hand
74
G
E M C
T A W H K Q F X U B Y O
R L D V I Z P J S
75
What do you remember?
76
G
E M C
T A W H K Q F X U B Y O
R L D V I Z P J S
77
Get ready Team Work
78
B
M R G W C K Q E U S L X H O V T
F N Y A P Z D I
79
GO TEAMS!
80
B
M R G W C K Q E U S L X H O V T
F N Y A P Z D I
81
(No Transcript)
82
Keys to Effective TEAMs
  • Collaboration is embedded in routine practices.
  • Time for collaboration is built in school day and
    school calendar.
  • Teams focus on key questions.
  • Products are made explicit.
  • Team norms guide collaboration.
  • Teams pursue specific and measurable performance
    goals.
  • Teams have access to relevant information.
  • R. DuFour

83
With your Learning Buddy 5
  • Group or
  • TEAM?
  • What new feathers have you gained today?

84
Moving forward with PLCs
  • With your Job Alike Team brainstorm Pros and
    Cons of becoming a PLC
  • Developed shared Pros and Cons
  • Reaching consensus of moving forward

85
Continuum of Reaching Agreement
  1. All of us can embrace the proposal.
  2. All of us can endorse the proposal.
  3. All of us can live with the proposal.
  4. All of us can agree not to sabotage the proposal.
  5. We have a majority at least 51 - in support of
    the proposal.

86
Consensus in a PLC
  • A group has arrived at consensus when
  • All points of view have been heard.
  • The will of the group is evident even to those
    who most oppose it.

87
Fist to Five Strategy
  • 5 Fingers I love this proposal. I will champion
    it.
  • 4 Fingers I strongly agree with the proposal.
  • 3 Fingers The proposal is okay with me. I am
    willing to go along.
  • 2 Fingers I have reservations and am not yet
    ready to support this proposal.
  • 1 Finger I am opposed to this proposal.
  • Fist If I were king or queen, I would veto this
    proposal, regardless of the will of the group.

88
(No Transcript)
89
Feedback please . . .
90

Anyone too busy to reflect on ones practice is
also too busy to improve.  
Anyone too busy to reflect on ones practice is
also too busy to improve. Robert Garmston
Robert Garmston
91
Plan for Next 2 Days
  • Day 2
  • Share results of feedback
  • Characteristics of PLCs
  • Where are we as an organization?
  • Culture is key (Learning versus Teaching
    Organization)
  • Group versus Team
  • Day 3
  • Communication/Team Building with classified staff
  • PM Classified Emergency Responder Training
  • PM Certificated PLC Teams moving forward

92
What we know today does not make yesterday
wrong, it makes tomorrow better.
Carol Commodore
93
Teamwork Matters
  • Interdependence is what organizations are all
    about. Productivity, performance, and innovation
    result from joint action, not just individual
    efforts and behavior.

  • Pfeffer Sutton,
    2000

94
Agenda Day 3
  • Communication/Team Building with classified staff
    (Denise Cabanilla Brenda San Roman)
  • PM Classified Emergency Responder Training
  • PM Certificated PLC Teams moving forward to the
    classroom.

95
Professional Learning
Communities
Welcome back!
At work within our organization
Imperial County Office of Education Special
Education Staff Development 2006-2007 Day 3
96
Feedback from Day Two
  • Number of Responses 30 Average 4.4 Range 3 - 5
  • FOUND USEFUL
  • Idea of collaboration/group and team work
  • Brain storming/seeing everyones views of
    Boosters/Barriers
  • Concrete Action Planning activity
  • The entire day/Motivation given to start the year
  • The commitment to PLCs
  • Activities that kept us moving
  • Meeting new people
  • I felt everyone had input
  • IMPROVEMENTS
  • Nothing (informative/kept us moving)
  • More hands on activities
  • Communication between staff and teachers?
  • Looking forward to spending more time on
    development of PLC vision
  • Slower instructions (hard to understand
    instructions)
  • Organization of activities
  • Trying to find more time to meet with others
  • Air Conditioning

97
NORMS for LEARNING
  • Listen through the filter of a question.
  • Share experiences to enrich others.
  • Set aside preconceived notions.
  • Pay attention to your feathers the Ahas you
    experience.
  • Learn by doing apply to your own work.
  • Respect the 100 Mile Rule.
  • Respect yourself and your colleagues.

98
Day Three Agenda
  • Welcome Back!
  • Signs of Life
  • Reflections
  • Developing shared mission and vision
  • Moving forward with PLCs developing norms
  • Next steps - planning

99
  • Creating a
  • Professional Learning Community
  • is a journey...

100
It begins with a shared understanding of where
you want to go, together,
101
and is fueled by a continuous process of
building the skill and the will to share
responsibility for the success of all learners.
102
SIGNS OF LIFE
  • Please rank the shapes in order of your
    preference.

103
SIGNS OF LIFE
GROWTH CHANGE
STABILITY
GOALS DREAMS
WHOLENESS
RELATIONSHIP
104
SIGNS OF LIFE
  • Meaning of Positions
  • 1. Where you think you are
  • 2. Your strengths
  • 3. Where you are (what is really going on
    what you bring to a team)
  • 4. Your motivation
  • 5. Old or unfinished business

105
SIGNS OF LIFE
  • Your Task
  • Based on your analysis of your Signs of Life
    shapes, create a summary statement that describes
    you. Provide evidence for your statement.
  • Share with your team.

106
Shaping our Reflections
  • Steps Taken
  • Squared with previous
    knowledge/experience
  • Diamonds in the Rough
  • Still Circling Around

107
John Kotter
  • No one individual is ever able to develop the
    right vision, communicate it to large numbers of
    people, eliminate all obstacles, generate
    short-term wins, lead and manage dozens of change
    projects and anchor new approaches deep in an
    organizations culture. A strong, guiding
    coalition is always needed one with a high
    level of trust and shared objectives that appeal
    to both head and heart. Building such a team is
    always an essential part of the early stages of
    any effort to restructure a set of strategies.
  • Leading Change, 1996

108
Our Mission
  • ICOE Mission
  • The Imperial County Office of Education is
    committed to improve the quality of life in
    Imperial County by providing excellent
    educational service and leadership to children,
    school districts, and our community.
  • Special Education Mission
  • The Imperial County Office of Education Special
    Education Department is dedicated to providing
    outstanding programs which maximize opportunities
    for all students to become responsible,
    productive citizens through a relevant curriculum
    provided by a highly trained staff responsive to
    the community, working in collaboration with
    parents and other support agencies.

109
Our Mission
  • (for whom) _______________________________________
    _________________________________
  • (what) ___________________________________________
    _____________________________
  • (why) ____________________________________________
    ____________________________
  • (how) ____________________________________________
    __________________________________________________
    __
  • We, __________, provide
  • (who)
  • ____________________ for
  • (what)
  • ___________, by ________
  • (whom) (how)
  • so they can ____________.
  • (why)
  • Example We, the Superintendents Cabinet,
    provide leadership and support for employees so
    they can maximize student learning.

110
Clarifying the Mission of our Department
  • What is our fundamental purpose?
  • Why was this school/department created? What have
    we been brought here to do together?
  • Does the concept of public education for all
    children mean that all students shall learn or
    merely that they will be required to attend
    school?
  • What happens in our department when a student
    experiences difficulty in learning?

111
With your PLC team
  • Use the questions from clarifying our mission and
    our current mission statement to make
    modifications for whole group to consider.

112
Developing Shared Vision
  • Can you describe the school/department we are
    trying to create?
  • What would our department look like if it were a
    great place for students? What would it look like
    if it were a great place for teachers?
  • It is 5 years from now and we have achieved our
    vision as a department. In what ways are we
    different? Describe what is going on in terms of
    practice, procedures, relationships, results, and
    climate.
  • Imagine we have been given 60 seconds on the
    nightly news to clarify the vision of our
    department. What do we want to say?

113
With your PLC team
  • Use the questions from developing our vision
    develop proposed vision for whole group to
    consider.

114
Special Education Vision
  • All students/children being served by our
    department will gain the knowledge, skills, and
    confidence to become contributing members of
    society through positive interactions with a
    highly skilled and passionate staff that work as
    a team for the good of our community and the
    families we serve.

115
Confusing Mission with Action
  • The words of a mission statement are not worth
    the paper they are written on unless people begin
    to do differently.
  • Learning By Doing
  • DuFour, DuFour, Eaker, Many, 2006

116
Clarifying Our Purpose with PLCs
  • The very essence of a professional learning
    community is a focus on and a commitment to the
    learning of each student.

117
COLLABORATIVE CULTURE
  • Collaboration is a social imperative. Without
    it people cant get extraordinary things done in
    organizations.
  • Kouzes Posner, 2003

118
NORMSThe standards of behaviors by which we
agree to operate while we are in this group.
  • Steps to Establish
  • Examples

119
Heres HOW
  • Develop and hold each other accountable to norms
    of collaboration.

NORMSThe standards of behaviors by which we
agree to operate while we are in this group.
See Session One, p. 47
120
NORMSThe standards of behaviors by which we
agree to operate while we are in this group.
  • What are the behaviors I need to live to
    maximize learning, mine and others?
  • What do I need from my colleagues to ensure our
    collective success?

121
Examples of Norms
  • Be open and honest say what you think and feel
    in the room, not in the parking lot.
  • Maintain confidentiality.
  • Be aware of your level of participation. Allow
    equal airtime for each member so the discussion
    is fair share.
  • Treat each person as an equal.
  • Set vested interests aside.
  • Assist all group members to be more productive.
  • Accept and support all decisions not identified
    as shared decisions when made by the principal or
    others.
  • Listen to understand others perspectives.
  • Respect others ideas and perspectives.
  • Speak directly to the person(s) when there is a
    need for confrontation, challenge, disagreement,
    etc.

122
Steps for Establishing Norms
  1. Members identify own needs.
  2. Members share their norms/needs.
  3. Clarify look like and sounds like for
    abstract norms.
  4. Ask for missing norms. Recommend or prompt
    others.
  5. Ask for agreement from total group.
  6. Work toward consensus with the norms
  7. Contract to give feedback. Get commitment to
    norms from ALL members.
  8. Post norms and review them frequently.

123
Consensus in a PLC
  • A group has arrived at consensus when
  • All points of view have been heard.
  • The will of the group is evident even to those
    who most oppose it.

124
Fist to Five Strategy
  • 5 Fingers I love this proposal. I will champion
    it.
  • 4 Fingers I strongly agree with the proposal.
  • 3 Fingers The proposal is okay with me. I am
    willing to go along.
  • 2 Fingers I have reservations and am not yet
    ready to support this proposal.
  • 1 Finger I am opposed to this proposal.
  • Fist If I were king or queen, I would veto this
    proposal, regardless of the will of the group.

125
With your PLC team
  • Work through steps to develop your PLC norms.

126
Heres WHY
  • Conflict is an inevitable by-product of the
    substantive change process. In fact, the absence
    of conflict suggests the changes are only
    superficial because conflict is essential to any
    successful change effort.
  • (Fullan, 1993)
  • Changes in attitudes follow, rather than precede,
    changes in behavior.
  • Unwillingness to follow through sends mixed
    messages about what is important and valued.

127
The Brutal Facts
  • Organizations only improve where the truth
    is told and the brutal facts confronted.
  • Jim Collins, 2001

128
Strategies for Engaging in Honest and Respectful
Dialogue
  • Clarify what you want and what you do not want to
    result from the conversation.
  • Attempt to find mutual purpose.
  • Create a safe environment for honest dialogue.
  • Use facts because gathering facts is the
    homework required for crucial conversations.
  • Share your thought process that has led to the
    conversation.
  • Encourage recipients to share their facts and
    thought processes.

Crucial Conversations by Patterson, Grenny,
McMillan, Switzler (2002)
129
Plans for next meeting
How are we going to continue moving forward with
PLCs?
130
Feedback please . . .
131
Leading change is a planned journey into
uncharted waters with a leaky boat and a mutinous
crew. Michael Fullan
132
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133
Thank you for your time, attention and
participation
134
Foundations for Success
MISSION VISION VALUES
GOALS
DEFINITION A clear statement of purpose, collaboratively developed
ESSENTIAL QUESTION What do we wish to become?
FOCUS Action Targets Timeline
BENEFIT Identifies specific strategies Guides behavior Builds ownership
135
Foundations for Success
MISSION VISION VALUES
GOALS
DEFINITION A clear statement of purpose, collaboratively developed Compelling picture of a preferred future that inspires action Clear and agreed-to statements of attitudes, behaviors, commitments (ABCs) Statements of action priorities that provide direction, define outcomes, and communicate expectations in measurable terms
ESSENTIAL QUESTION Why do we Exist? What do we wish to become? How will we behave? Which steps and when?
FOCUS Fundamental Purpose End in Mind (Compelling future) Collective Commitments Action Targets Timeline
BENEFIT Clarifies unifies purpose Sharpens focus Gives meaning to work Defines target Gives direction Identifies specific strategies Guides behavior Builds ownership Organizes improvement efforts Creates pathway to reach target Establishes short-term priorities Facilitates celebration
136
DIMENSIONS of SUCCESS
RESULTS
PROCESS
RELATIONSHIPS
Interaction Associates, LLC
137
OVERALL PURPOSE
NON-PURPOSE
PURPOSE OF NEXT SESSION
138
  • Leaders are always in a better position to
    confront when they act as the promoters and
    protectors of decisions, agreements, and
    commitments of the group.

139
What lies behind us and what lies ahead of us are
insignificant compared to what lies within
us. Oliver Wendell Holmes
140
We have not succeeded in solving all of our
problems, indeed we have not entirely succeeded
in solving any of our problems. The answers we
have found, have in many ways, served to raise a
whole new set of questions. In many ways, we
remain as confused as ever. However, we now feel
that we are confused on a higher level and about
more important things.
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