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Hands on Science

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Hands on Science & The Common Core Presented by: Leslie Humphreys, M.Ed ABE Instructor Garnet Career & Technology Center * Chemistry (continue) Concepts covered ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Hands on Science


1
Hands on Science The Common Core
  • Presented by Leslie Humphreys, M.Ed
  • ABE Instructor
  • Garnet Career Technology Center

2
Getting Started
  • Create an environment of cooperation and teamwork
    to improve student participation.

3
Getting Started
  • Create an environment of cooperation and teamwork
    to improve student participation.
  • Count off into 1s and 2s. Divide into your
    respective group.

4
Getting Started
  • Create an environment of cooperation and teamwork
    to improve student participation.
  • Count off into 1s and 2s. Divide into your
    respective group.
  • Organize your group according to the month and
    day of each members birthday without speaking.

5
Why Bother with Hands on Science Activities?
  • Students remember
  • 20 of what is read

6
Why Bother with Hands on Science Activities?
  • Students remember
  • 20 of what is read
  • 20 of what is heard

7
Why Bother with Hands on Science Activities?
  • Students remember
  • 20 of what is read
  • 20 of what is heard
  • 30 of what is seen

8
Why Bother with Hands on Science Activities?
  • Students remember
  • 20 of what is read
  • 20 of what is heard
  • 30 of what is seen
  • 50 of what is seen heard

9
However
  • If doing is added to seeing and hearing,
    learning comes even faster. It is the doing that
    makes learning permanent.
  • Terri L. White

10
Knowles Theory of Andragogy
  • Makes six assumptions
  • As a person matures, the self-concept moves from
    a dependent personality to a self-directing human
    being.

11
Knowles Theory of Andragogy
  • Makes six assumptions
  • As a person matures, the self-concept moves from
    a dependent personality to a self-directing human
    being.
  • Adults accumulate a growing reservoir of
    experience, which is a rich resource for learning.

12
Knowles Theory of Andragogy
  • Makes six assumptions
  • As a person matures, the self-concept moves from
    a dependent personality to a self-directing human
    being.
  • Adults accumulate a growing reservoir of
    experience, which is a rich resource for
    learning.
  • Readiness to learn is closely related to
    developmental tasks in the individuals social
    role.

13
Knowles (cont.)
  1. There is a change in time perspective as people
    mature from future utilization of knowledge to
    immediate application.

14
Knowles (cont.)
  1. There is a change in time perspective as people
    mature from future utilization of knowledge to
    immediate application.
  2. Potent motivators for adults are internal rather
    than external.

15
Knowles (cont.)
  1. There is a change in time perspective as people
    mature from future utilization of knowledge to
    immediate application.
  2. Potent motivators for adults are internal rather
    than external.
  3. Adults need to know why they need to learn
    something.

16
Where to start?
  • Casual knowledge for the High School Equivalency
    Test.
  • What is it?
  • Knowledge that is assumed a student knows. It is
    not included as part of the reading or hinted at
    in the question.

17
Web Scavenger Hunt
  • Activity
  • Student handout covers
  • Life Science
  • Chemistry
  • Physical Science
  • Nutrition
  • Ecosystems
  • Students fill in what they know and search the
    web to gather the information needed to complete
    the handout.

18
Life Science
  • Population of Species
  • Population Density Handout
  • Small group question activity

19
Population Density Measurement ActivityPearson
Method
  • Calculating Population Density
  • Marked animals in 2nd sample
  • Total caught in 2nd sample
  • Marked animals in 1st sample
  • Total population size

20
  • Measure off a square section of field
  • (Best done in late August/September)
  • One student keeps chart, one student holds jar,
    and one student uses nail polish
  • Remaining students catch grasshoppers,
  • take them to receive a stroke of nail polish
    placed on them, tallied on the chart, and put in
    the jar until 100 grasshoppers have been marked.
    Release grasshoppers back in the area.

21
One week later.
  • Return to the marked off area
  • Students catch 100 grasshoppers
  • Use prior procedure
  • Record how many have the nail polish tag as
    opposed to those that are unmarked
  • Release the grasshoppers into the field
  • Return to classroom to complete the calculation
    and debrief.

22
Calculate
  • 100 grasshoppers were caught marked
  • 57 of the second sampling were marked
  • Therefore
  • 57 100
  • 100 100
  • 100 x 100 1000 175 Total Population
  • 57 57

23
Common Core
  • Standard
  • ELACC9-10RST7 Translate quantitative or technical
    information expressed in words in a text into
    visual form (e.g. table or chart) and translate
    information expressed visually or mathematically
    into words.

24
Depth of Knowledge
  • Level 1- Recall
  • Level II Skill/Concept
  • Level III Strategic Reasoning

25
  • Eco-systems

26
For Each Experiment
  • Students complete a 4 x 6 card which is
    customized to the experiment.
  • SAMPLE
  • Name Date
  • Water Density
  • What do you think will happen during the
    experiment?
  • What is surface tension?
  • What is density?
  • How many pennies do you think will fit into the
    cup?
  • Was your prediction accurate?
  • What did you learn from the experiment?

27
Water Density
  • Work in pairs/small groups. Complete the 4 x 6
    card as outlined. Each student must make a
    prediction.
  • Give each group a clear plastic cup, pennies, and
    paper towels.
  • The instructor will move to each group filling
    the cup to the rim and demonstrating how to
    insert the pennies.
  • Students take turns inserting pennies, recording
    observations and the count until the cup
    overflows.
  • When the last group has finished, debrief and
    begin to form explanations for the process.

28
Saltwater
  • Each student will make a prediction as to the
    level of salinity it takes to make an egg float.
  • Divide students into small groups.
  • Each group will have a glass ¾ full of water.
  • Drop the egg into the cup.
  • Remove the egg and add 1t of salt to the cup.
  • Drop the egg into the cup.
  • Repeat the procedure until the egg floats.
  • Debrief how the salt affected the water and
    allowed the egg to float.

29
Associated GED study materials
  • Contemporary GED Science
  • Evaluating Analyzing Science Materials
  • Page 67
  • Steck Vaughn GED Science
  • Lesson 14
  • Vocabulary
  • Surface Tension Gravitational separation
  • Density

30
Common Core
  • ELACC9-10RST3 Follow precisely a complex
    multistep procedure when carrying out
    experiments, taking measurements, or perform
    technical tasks attending to special cases or
    exceptions defined in a text.

31
Depth of Knowledge
  • Level 1- Recall
  • Level II Skill/Concept
  • Level III Strategic Reasoning

32
Chemistry
33
Chemistry
  • The Periodic Table
  • During this lesson, introduce students to
    terminology they will likely encounter on the
    test atomic number, symbol of element, name of
    element, and atomic mass.

12 Mg Magnesium
34
Chemistry (continue)
  • Concepts covered include
  • Endothermic reactions
  • Exothermic reactions
  • States of matter
  • Ice Cream Experiment
  • This experiment covers the concepts listed above
    as well as reviewing common symbols for elements
    used in the experiment.

35
Making Ice Cream
  • Ingredients
  • small zip lock bags
  • large zip lock bags
  • 6 T table salt
  • 1 Tsugar
  • 1t vanilla
  • ½ cups cream
  • 2 cups crushed ice
  • Thermometers

36
Making Ice Cream
  • Mix the sugar, vanilla, and cream in the small
    bag and seal tightly.
  • Place the ice in the large bag and take a
    temperature reading. (record)
  • Then add the salt to the ice and take a second
    reading. (record)
  • Put the small bag inside the large bag and squish
    them together, rocking the bag for 10 minutes or
    more.

37
Making Ice Cream
  • When you remove the ice cream from the larger
    bag, take one final temperature reading (record)
  • Debrief the activity as you eat ?
  • Did the ice cream taste as you expected?
  • Did it take as long as you estimated for the
    mixture to begin to solidify?
  • What was the endothermic reaction that took
    place?
  • What was the effect of the salt on the ice?
  • Where do we see this type of reaction in life?
  • What was the exothermic reaction in the
    experiment?

38
Associated GED study materials
  • Steck-Vaughn GED Science
  • Lessons 14 15 16
  • I Pad App Nova Elements
  • 501 Science Experiments, Hinkler Books

39
Charcoal Crystal Garden
  • Divide class into small groups.
  • Distribute directions and materials to create the
    garden.
  • charcoal briquettes, ammonia, salt, bluing, and
    food coloring to grow a sort of crystal garden.
  • Place chunks of charcoal in an even layer in the
    non-metal pan. You want pieces that are roughly
    1-inch in diameter, so you may need to use a
    hammer to break the material up. I used Styrofoam
    containers for my class.

40
Charcoal Garden Continued
  • Sprinkle water, preferably distilled, onto the
    charcoal until it has been thoroughly dampened.
    Pour off any excess water.
  • In an empty jar, mix 3 tablespoons (45 ml)
    uniodized salt, 3 tablespoons (45 ml) ammonia,
    and 6 tablespoons (90 ml) bluing. Stir until the
    salt is dissolved.
  • Pour the mixture over the prepared charcoal.
  • Students document the changes each day for 1
    week. Debrief experiment at the end of the week.

41
The Feelings of H2O
Careful how you communicate with water. It is
thin skinned! Yet surprisingly strong
Surface tension is the property that makes the
surface of water appear to have a sort of elastic
"skin," and is caused by the way water molecules
are more attracted to each other than to the air.
42
Soap Boats
  • Materials
  • Index card
  • Liquid dish soap
  • What to do
  • Cut the index card into the shape of a boat with
    a notch in the back, just like the diagram.
  • Fill a shallow pan, sink, or bathtub with water
    and set your boat on the surface.
  • Pour a few drops of dish soap in the notch at the
    back of the boat.

43
Soap Boats Results
  • What's happening?
  • When your boat sits in the water the surface
    tension is the same on all sides. When you put
    the drop of soap near the back, however, the soap
    molecules break the water's surface tension. The
    force of the surface tension pulling on the front
    of the boat is now greater than the force pulling
    behind, so the boat moves forward. (Make sure you
    use clean water if you try again it won't work
    if the water is already soapy.)

44
Common Core
  • 8.P.1.2 Explain how the physical changes such as
    size, shape, and state to chemical changes that
    are the result of a chemical reaction to include
    changes in temperature, color, formation of gas
    or precipitate.
  • CCR Anchor 9 Draw evidence from literary or
    informational texts to support analysis,
    reflection, and research.

45
Depth of Knowledge
  • Level II Skill/Concept
  • Level III Strategic Reasoning
  • Level IV Extended Thinking

46
Biology
47
Biology
  • Population Growth Rate
  • Read/Review handout as a class.
  • Divide into 3 groups to discuss and answer the
    questions on the worksheet.
  • Each group will select one representative to
    report on the groups answers.

48
Nutrition Project Based Lesson
  • Availability to food affects a populations growth
    rate.
  • This activity allows students to learn basic
    nutritional facts, while creating a project which
    allows them to utilize math, science, and writing
    skills.
  • In addition to the materials provided you will
    need copies of current flyers from local grocery
    stores (I used Kroger and Foodland).

49
Nutrition Project (continued)
  • The challenge Everyone has groused about school
    lunches for years ? It is your turn to plan one
    week of lunches for GED Elementary School.
  • You have been given 500.00 to spend for the
    week. You will need to plan to feed 30 students
    per day. (You will not need to purchase paper
    products.)
  • Use the nutrition pyramid to ensure you meet
    healthy meal requirements, and the grocery store
    flyers to determine the cost of your lunches.
    (You must use items listed in the flyers for your
    menus)

50
Nutrition Project (continued)
  • You may not serve soda, Gatorade or other sugary
    drinks.
  • You may serve a treat (ice cream, cookie) once
    during the week.
  • You must calculate the servings you will get from
    each item on your shopping list to ensure you
    have enough to feed your students.
  • At the end of the week, we will vote for the most
    popular menu as well as, the most economical and
    nutritious menus.

51
GED Question Tie-ins
  • Contemporarys GED Science
  • Chapter 8 Human Biology
  • Understanding Nutritional Fact Labels
  • www.fda.gov/Food/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/NFLPM/u
    cm274593.htm
  • www.webmd.com/food-recipes/tc/healthy-eating-overv
    iew

52
Aging Reaction Time
  • Reflex Experiment
  • Select at least four members from your group to
    represent different age groups (ie, 20s 30s
    40s etc.).
  • Hold a ruler vertically above each individual by
    the 12 end.
  • The individual should have their thumb and index
    finger ready to pinch the ruler and stop its
    fall. Record the measurement at which the ruler
    was caught on the graph below. Conduct 5 trials
    with each individual.
  • Analyze your data as a group when all trials are
    completed. Create a graph of your results.
    Write a paragraph to explain what the data shows.
    What conclusions can you draw?

53
Common Core
  • 8.L.5.1 Summarize how food provides the energy
    and the molecules required for building
    materials, growth and survival of all organisms.
  • 8.L.5.2 Explain the relationship among a healthy
    diet, exercise, and the general health of the
    body.

54
Depth of Knowledge
  • Level 1- Recall
  • Level II Skill/Concept
  • Level III Strategic Reasoning

55
Physics
56
Physics
  • The Science of Energy
  • Newtons Laws of Motion
  • If no force is applied, an object at rest will
    remain at rest, and an object in motion will move
    in a straight line at a constant speed.
  • An objects speed increases in proportion to the
    amount of force applied. For the same amount of
    applied force, a lighter object accelerates
    (changes its speed) at a greater rate than a
    heavier object.
  • For every action, there is an equal and opposite
    reaction.

57
Making Predictions
  • Based on Newtons laws of motion
  • Estimate which parachute will fall the fastest
  • Paper
  • Cloth
  • Plastic
  • Why do you believe this is so?

58
Which parachute?
  • Each team will make 3 parachutes. One will be
    made of paper, one of plastic, and one of cloth.
    (8 x 8)
  • Measure the height from which the parachute is
    dropped. Conduct 3 trials at different heights.
    What happens?
  • One team member will record the time it takes for
    each parachute to reach the ground.

59
The Race
  • Friction affects the rate at which a car travels.
  • There are three tracks today. Wood, carpet, and
    sandpaper.
  • If the cars are released at the same time, which
    one do you predict will be the winner? Why?
  • Does the slope of the track affect speed?

60
GED Question Tie-ins
  • 501 Science Experiments
  • Contemporarys GED Science
  • Chapter 10

61
Common Core
  • 7.P.1.1 Explain how the motion of an object can
    be described by its position, direction of
    motion, and the speed with respect to some other
    object.
  • 7.P.1.2 Explain the effects of balanced and
    unbalanced forces acting on an object (including
    friction, gravity, and magnets).
  • ELACC9-10RST7 Translate quantitative or
    technical information expressed in words in a
    text into visual form and translate information
    expressed visually into words.

62
Depth of Knowledge
  • Level 1- Recall
  • Level II Skill/Concept
  • Level III Strategic Reasoning

63
In Conclusion
  • Many students in public school experienced
    science by reading a textbook.
  • Science comes alive through the use of
    experiments.
  • Students are more engaged when involved in hands
    on learning.
  • Students use higher order thinking skills when
    experimentation occurs.
  • Science experiments also utilize writing and
    math, strengthening those skills as well.

64
References
  • Merriam, S., Caffarella, R., Baumgartner, L.
    (2007). Learning in Adulthood. San Francisco
    Jossey-Bass.
  • Muschla, J., Muschla, G. (2006). Hands-on Math
    Projects . San Francisco Jossey-Bass Teacher.
  • Singleton, G. (2007). 501 Science Experiments.
    China Himkler Books.
  • White, T. (n.d.). Retrieved September 18, 2012,
    from Koinonia http//www.koinonia-all.org
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