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Differentiated Instruction for Math III Day 1

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... try our a variety of problem solving approaches EX-create your own area & perimeter problem using shapes Interpersonal Make personal connections and solve ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Differentiated Instruction for Math III Day 1


1
Differentiated Instruction for Math III Day 1
  • Evelyn Blalock
  • Columbus State University
  • blalock_evelyn_at_colstate.edu
  • Summer 2010

2
Agenda for the Week
  • Purpose of Differentiated Instruction
  • Getting to Know the Learners
  • Flexible Grouping/ Managing Teams Tasks
  • Differentiated Instruction Strategies for
    Content, Process, and Product
  • Menu
  • Tiered Instruction
  • Plan of Implementation Activities
  • Complete a learning style inventory
  • Create lessons using 2 differentiated instruction
    strategies
  • Modify a Tiered Lesson Plan for students with
    disabilities
  • Integrate differentiated assessment and
    modifications into lessons
  • Gregory Chapman (2007, p. 6) Overview

3
Agenda for Today
  • Differentiated Instruction Overview
  • Purpose
  • Getting to know your students
  • Learning Styles Interests
  • Math Learning Styles
  • Plan of Implementation Activity
  • Applying Math Tools to a differentiated lesson

4
Why Differentiate?
  • Think (Individually) 30 seconds
  • Pair (share thoughts ideas) 1 min.
  • Share with Grade level group 1 min.

5
Why Differentiate?
  • All kids are different.
  • One size does not fit all.
  • Differentiation provides ALL students with access
    to the general curriculum.

6
Quote from a Teachers Lounge
7
Differentiation values Difference
  • Fairness is not when everyone gets the same.
  • Fairness is when everyone gets what he or she
    needs.
  • Think-Pair-Share What does this statement mean
    for students? For teachers? For administrators?

8
Why Differentiate? Diversity of Learners
  • Readiness
  • Achievement gap
  • Special needs
  • Believe in the possibilities in each student
  • Learning Style
  • Multiple Intelligences
  • Interest
  • Motivation
  • Accommodations are available to all students
    part of the class structure

9
Why Differentiate?
Increased
Motivation Time on-task
Increased Learning
10
Why Differentiate? Diversity of content
  • Georgia DOE Core Instruction for ALL students
  • Standards and Benchmarks
  • 25 years to teach them all (Marzano)
  • Multiple ways to teach content and concepts

11
What type of Learning Style do you use most often
when learning new material?
  • Visual
  • Auditory
  • Kinesthetic

12
Learning Styles Interests Inventories
  • Learning Styles Inventories
  • http//www.engr.ncsu.edu/learningstyles/ilsweb.htm
    l
  • http//www.metamath.com/lsweb/dvclearn.htm
  • http//www.learning-styles-online.com/
  • Multiple Intelligences Inventories
  • www.bgfl.org/bgfl/custom/resources_ftp/client_ftp/
    ks1/ict/multiple_int/index.htm Gives a visual
  • http//www.personal.psu.edu/bxb11/MI/MIQuiz.htm
  • http//www.uen.org/utahlink/tours/tourFames.cgi?to
    ur_id15077 Using your MI in School
  • Motivation/ Interests (Gregory Chapman, p.
    54-56)
  • http//faculty.citadel.edu/hewett/web_files/inter
    estweb.html

13
Differentiated Instruction Intro
  • Differentiated Instruction in Action High School
  • Flexible Grouping
  • Video Quick Fire Challenge in History class
  • Heterogeneous by mixing learning styles
  • Use of roles

14
Math Learning Styles (Silver, Brunsting, Walsh,
2008, pp 4-15)
  • Mastery
  • Understanding
  • Self-expression
  • Interpersonal

15
4 Math Instructional Styles
  • 4 Instructional Styles (6th grade) all studying
    area and perimeter
  • Mastery
  • Apply formulas, compute accurately, reinforce
    skills through practice
  • EX-apply formulas you already know
  • Understanding
  • Discover patterns, make generalizations, develop
    mathematical explanations
  • EX-explain the process you used to figure out
    your answer
  • Self-expression
  • Think creatively, develop new problems, try our a
    variety of problem solving approaches
  • EX-create your own area perimeter problem using
    shapes
  • Interpersonal
  • Make personal connections and solve real world
    problems
  • EX-draw floor plan of your house, How much carpet?

16
Math Tool Example
  • Interpersonal Math Tool, Whos Right?
  • Tool Matrix, pp. 168-169
  • Statistics has been used to make a claim.
  • Examine the data closely and apply mathematical
    concepts to determine Whos Right?

Interpret the exam results from these two
classes. The first class (Chart 1) took the exam
in the morning. The second class (Chart 2) took
the exam after lunch. Which class did better on
the exam? Can we use these data to say that it is
better to take this exam in the morning than in
the afternoon?
17
Learning Math Instructional Style Activity
  • Individual Activity
  • Learning Objective Students will investigate the
    relationships between lines and circles.
  • What Math Instructional Style do you use most
    often?
  • Find 1 Math Tool to teach Conics
  • Use the matrix to find a Math Tool
  • Pick a style that you use least often.
  • Find 1 Math Tool to teach Conics
  • Use the matrix to find a Math Tool

18
Learning Math Instructional Style Activity
  • Group Activity How to teach content
  • Share with your Group
  • Math Tool for preferred Math Instructional Style
  • Math Tool for least used Math Instructional Style
  • Expand it
  • Create a way to use a Math Tool to teach content
    for any Math Instructional Style not covered
  • Alter your instructional plans using the Math
    Tools to use them as a group to differentiate for
    an entire class

19
Teachers Can Differentiate
Content
Process
Product
According to Students
Interest
Learning Profile
Readiness
Adapted from The Differentiated Classroom
Responding to the Needs of All Learners
(Tomlinson, 1999)
20
What to Differentiate
CONTENT
PROCESS
PRODUCT
21
What to Differentiate
CONTENT
WHAT students learn
PROCESS
PRODUCT
HOW students learn
How students SHOW what theyve learned
22
Content
  • Content What is being taught.
  • differentiate the actual content being presented
    to students
  • remediate, accelerate, or enrich using basic or
    more complex resources
  • Examples
  • Connecting learning to real life uses
  • Leveling or Tiering materials Adjustable
    Assignments (Gregory Chapman, p. 71-76)
  • Using a variety of instructional materials
  • Providing choice (Gregory Chapman, p. 152-158)
  • Using selective abandonment
  • Acceleration, compacting, flexible pacing
  • (Gregory Chapman (2007) Differentiated
    Instructional Strategies One Size Doesnt Fit
    All)

23
Process
  • Process How the student learns what is being
    taught.
  • Differentiated by addressing different learning
    styles, levels of thinking, and kinds of thinking
  • Examples
  • Flexible Grouping
  • Jigsaw (Gregory Chapman, p. 115-117)
  • Task Cards and Tiered groups (Differentiated
    Instruction in Action Video)
  • Research and Brain-Based Instructional strategies
    from Marzano like Graphic Organizers (Gregory
    Chapman, p. 101-108)
  • Learning contracts (Gregory Chapman, p.
    162-165)
  • Choice boards Menus (Gregory Chapman, p.
    153-158 163)
  • Compacting (Gregory Chapman, p. 77-81)
  • Interest groups flexible grouping (Gregory
    Chapman, p. 84-90)
  • Blooms Taxonomy, Higher Level Questioning
    (Gregory Chapman, p. 120-123)
  • (Gregory Chapman (2007) Differentiated
    Instructional Strategies One Size Doesnt Fit
    All)

24
Product
  • Product How the student shows what he or she has
    learned.
  • differentiated by addressing different learning
    styles
  • providing choice in variety
  • different levels of complexity of products
  • Performance tasks Examples (Gregory Chapman, p.
    119)
  • Oral presentation
  • Math Log or journal
  • Draw a picture
  • Record findings
  • Play Who Wants to be a Millionaire or Jeopardy
  • Design a brochure for the process
  • Color code a sequence
  • Write a song
  • Make a bar graph and interpret the data
  • Learning Contract (Gregory Chapman, p. 162-165)
  • (Gregory Chapman, 2007 Differentiated
    Strategies One Size Doesnt Fit All)

25
GO-GO-MO Give One, Get One, Move On
  • Fill in the first three boxes with ideas of how
    you can differentiate in Math III.
  • Circulate around the room.
  • Give one idea to someone, get one idea from them
    to write in a box. Move on another person.
  • Goal fill all boxes with different ideas.
  • Put your Differentiated GO-GO-MO in your folder
    turn your Exit Ticket into Evelyn
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