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OSHA Recordkeeping

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OSHA Recordkeeping Does This Standard Apply to You? (Partially Exempt Industries) An employer who had no more than 10 employees at any time Hardware stores Meat ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: OSHA Recordkeeping


1
OSHA Recordkeeping
2
Does This Standard Apply to You? (Partially
Exempt Industries)
  • An employer who had no more than 10 employees at
    any time
  • Hardware stores
  • Meat fish markets
  • Eating drinking places
  • Liquor stores
  • Insurance carriers
  • Apparel Accessory Stores
  • New and Used Car Dealers
  • Gasoline service stations
  • Real estate agents
  • Photographic studios
  • Reupholster furniture repair
  • Radio, t.v. computer stores
  • Offices clinics of MDs, Dentists, other Health
    practitioners
  • Medical dental labs
  • Legal services
  • Educational services
  • Child day care services
  • Museums art galleries
  • Motion picture
  • Producers, orchestras, entertainers
  • Bowling centers
  • Advertising services
  • Credit reporting collection services
  • Beauty barber shops

3
State Programs
  • Check your own state program for recordkeeping
    requirements.

4
What are the Recordkeeping Reporting
Requirements?
  • If you are covered under Federal OSHA you must
    keep these records or report the following
  • OSHA Form 300 Log
  • OSHA Form 300A Summary
  • OSHA Form 301 or equivalent
  • Fatalities
  • Hospitalization of 3 or more employees
  • All fatal heart attacks that occur in the work
    environment
  • Please check your state program if applicable.

5
Whats Recordable?
  • Fatality.
  • Loss of consciousness.
  • Days away from work.
  • Restricted or light duty work as ordered by a
    health provider.
  • Any work injury or illness that is significant.
  • Medical treatment (see next slide).
  • Prescription medication ordered (even if it is
    over the counter medication given at prescription
    levels).

6
Medical Treatment
  • Diagnostic test with positive findings (i.e.,
    positive x-ray, CT scan).
  • Usually includes admission to a hospital.
  • Sutures are given.
  • Therapy is given or prescribed.
  • Using a derma-bond to close a wound.
  • Rigid supports, splints

7
Other Recordable Criteria
  • Needle stick injuries or cut from sharp object
    contaminated with blood or OPIMs (other
    potentially infectious materials).
  • A situation where an employee has to be medically
    removed under OSHAs health standards.
  • TB per a skin test, physician diagnosis or
    exposure to known case of active TB.
  • Employee audiogram reveals standard threshold
    shift in one or both ears and total hearing level
    is 25 dB or more above audiometric zero.
  • Note Other infectious diseases
  • To be recordable, it must fit recordable
    criteria.
  • Exposure alone is not recordable exposure must
    cause a test result.
  • Follow-up on cases to see if exposure caused
    test outcomes.

8
Whats Not Recordable
  • Visit to a provider solely for observation or
    evaluation.
  • Diagnostic tests with negative findings.
  • First aid is given (see next slide).
  • Non-prescription or over-the-counter medications
    are given.
  • Accident/illness occurred outside the course of
    work.

9
First Aid
  • Tetanus shot
  • Cleaning, flushing, soaking surface wound
  • Wound coverings (butterfly, bandage, steri-strips
  • Hot/cold therapy
  • Non-rigid support (wrap)
  • Temp. immobilization device used to transport
    employee
  • Drilling finger/toe nail
  • Draining blister
  • Eye patch
  • Remove foreign body from eye with swab,
    irrigation
  • Remove foreign body from skin with tweezers,
    swab, irrigation etc.
  • Finger guard
  • Massage
  • Drink fluids for heat stress relief
  • Using type liquid bandage to cover a wound

10
OSHAs Form 300 LogHow to Complete
  • First complete establishments name location in
    the upper right of the log.
  • Column A (case number). This is usually done in
    numeric order.
  • Column B (employee name).

11
Do Not Put Name on Log When (Column B)
  • Injury/illness to reproductive part or intimate
    body part.
  • Injury/illness from sexual assault.
  • Mental illness.
  • Case of HIV, TB or hepatitis.
  • Needle stick injury or cut from sharp object that
    is contaminated with blood or OPIMs.
  • If employee independently voluntarily requests
    their name not be on the log.
  • Instead enter privacy case where the name would
    usually go on the 300 Log.
  • You must then keep a separate, confidential list
    of the case numbers employees names.

12
OSHAs Form 300 LogHow to Complete
  • Column C (job title).
  • Column D (date of injury or illness onset).
  • Column E (where the incident occurred).

13
OSHAs Form 300 LogHow to Complete
  • Column F (describe injury or illness).
  • Classify the case (columns G, H, I, J)
  • Choose only one of these categories
  • Record the most serious outcome of each incident
  • For example, if the employee missed 2 weeks of
    work per physicians orders and then was on light
    duty for 1 week, record this as days away from
    work as this is more serious than light duty for
    one week.

14
OSHAs Form 300 LogHow to Complete
  • Next complete how many days the employee was away
    from work or did work but with a job transfer or
    restriction (columns K, L)
  • Count calendar days, not only the days the worker
    was scheduled to work.
  • Do not count the date of injury.
  • Complete both columns if applicable.

15
OSHAs Form 300 LogHow To Complete
  • Column M 1-6 (check whether the incident was an
    injury or choose which illness).
  • Make sure to put totals at the bottom of all
    columns when the page is full and/or at the end
    of the calendar year.

16
OSHAs Form 300 LogClassifying Injuries vs.
Illnesses
  • Injuries
  • Cut
  • Puncture
  • Laceration
  • Abrasion
  • Fracture
  • Bruise
  • Contusion
  • Chipped tooth
  • Amputation
  • Insect bite
  • Electrocution
  • Radiation burn
  • Sprains/strains (from slip,trip, fall
  • Illnesses
  • Skin disease or disorder
  • Respiratory conditions
  • Poisoning
  • Hearing Loss
  • Other
  • Effects environmental heat or cold
  • Decompression sickness
  • Ionizing and nonionizing radiation
  • Anthrax
  • BBP disease
  • Tumors
  • Brucellosis
  • Histoplasmosis

17
OSHAs Form 300 LogOther Notes
  • Each recordable case must be recorded within 7
    calendar days of receiving the information.
  • If the outcome changes after the entry
  • Draw a line through the entry OR
  • Delete the entry OR
  • White-out the entry
  • Re-record the incident where it belongs
  • Stop counting days when it exceeds more than 180
    days (enter 180 or 180).
  • Can include days away from work,
    restricted/alternate work days, or a combination
    of both.

18
OSHAs Form 300 Log Other Notes
  • If your company has multiple sites keep separate
    records for each physical location (that is in
    operation 1 year or longer).
  • Cases that carryover to the next year
  • Example Employee is hurt on December 29th and
    is away from work until January 10th.
  • You only need to record this case once (the year
    it occurred).
  • If the employee is still away when summary is
    prepared (before Feb. 1st) either count the
    number of days employee was away or estimate
    total days away that are expected.
  • Update the Log entry later when the actual number
    of days is known (or the case reaches the 180-day
    cap).

19
OSHAs Form 300A Summary
  • Transfer totals of columns G M from the 300 Log
    onto the corresponding spaces of the 300A
    Summary.
  • Make sure to include all employees that were
  • Full-time
  • Part-time
  • Temporary
  • Seasonal
  • Salaried
  • Hourly

20
OSHAs Form 300A Summary
  • Complete Establishment section.
  • Complete Employment section
  • Please refer to the Summary worksheet if you need
    assistance completing
  • average number of employees
  • total hours worked
  • Complete the signature section
  • Ensure a top company executive signs the Summary.

21
OSHAs Form 300A Summary - Posting
  • The 300A Summary is posted Feb. 1 through April
    30th of the next calendar year (example the
    summary for 2007 is posted Feb. 1 through April
    30th 2008).
  • You do not post the 300 Log.
  • Post the 300A Summary in a visible location.

22
Recordkeeping for Contracted Employees
  • If you have contracted employees
  • Injuries and illnesses are counted on the 300 log
    and summary
  • Include their work hours in the summary
  • Exception if the contracted company has their
    own management on-site you do not need to count
    their injuries/ illnesses or work hours
  • Example Company A has hired Ajax Cleaning to do
    housekeeping in the facility. Ajax has their own
    supervisor on-site. Ajax then is responsible for
    their own recordkeeping.

23
For 300 300A Forms
  • Even if there were no cases for a calendar year,
    there still must be a Form 300 and 300A
    completed.
  • Put zero in the columns if this is the outcome
    dont leave columns blank.

24
OSHAs Form 301Incident Report
  • Each recordable case must be recorded within 7
    calendar days of receiving the information.
  • Some states Workers Compensation, insurance or
    similar reports may be acceptable substitutes
    (example IL Form 45).
  • Substitute forms must contain all the information
    as Form 301 requests.

25
How Long Do You Keep Records?
  • You must keep the current years records (300,
    300A, 301) plus the previous five (5) years of
    records.
  • Make sure records are readily accessible and that
    more than one person has access to the records.
  • Records do not have to be sent to OSHA unless
    OSHA requests.
  • Present employees, past employees and their
    representatives are allowed to view the Form 300
    Log.
  • Forms can be kept on the computer as long as they
    can be produced when needed.

26
Common SituationsNOT Recordable
  • Employee was present in the work environment as a
    member of the general public and not as an
    employee.
  • Injury/illness signs or symptoms appear at work
    but resulted solely from outside work.
  • Incident occurred from voluntary participation in
    wellness program, fitness, medical, or
    recreational activities.
  • Eating, drinking, or food prep for personal
    consumption even if bought on employers premises
    or brought in.
  • Occurs solely from employee doing personal tasks
    at the establishment or outside working hours.
  • Incident occurred from result of personal
    grooming, self-medication.
  • There is a MVA which occurs in company parking
    lot or access road when employee is commuting.
  • Common cold or flu.
  • Mental illness (unless HCP states is
    work-related).

27
How About Travel?
  • Is considered work-related if
  • An injury or illness occurs while an employee is
    on travel status, or if it occurs while the
    employee was engaged in work activities.
  • If an employee detours for personal reasons than
    the incident is not work-related.

28
How About Working at Home?
  • Injuries illnesses that occur while an employee
    is working at home are work-related if
  • They occur while the employee is performing work
    for pay or compensation in the home and
  • Are directly related to the performance of work
    rather than the general home environment.

29
Other Required Reporting
  • You must report any of the following to OSHA
    within 8 hours
  • Fatality of any employee due to work-related
    incident.
  • Any in-patient hospitalization of 3 or more
    employees.
  • Report by phone or in person to an Area Office of
    OSHA or USDOL.
  • Report any fatal heart attack that occurred in
    the work environment.

30
Other Required Reporting Sharps Log
  • OSHA 1910.1030(h)(5)(i) requires employers to
    maintain a sharps injury log for percutaneous
    injuries from contaminated sharps.
  • The log must
  • Protect the confidentiality of the injured
    employee
  • Identify the type and brand of the device
    involved
  • Identify the department or work area where the
    incident occurred
  • Provide an explanation how the incident occurred
  • Be maintained like the 300 log (have the current
    log plus previous 5 years logs).
  • Enter the case on the OSHA 300 log as an injury
    but with no employee name (use privacy case).

31
References
  • OSHA 1910.1904 standard.
  • www.OSHA.gov
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