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Software Configuration Management: Selecting the Right Tool

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Software Configuration Management: Selecting the Right Tool Chetan Desai Software Project Management SWEN 5230 Dr. Boetticher What is SCM? History CM Origins SCM ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Software Configuration Management: Selecting the Right Tool


1
Software Configuration Management Selecting the
Right Tool
  • Chetan Desai
  • Software Project Management
  • SWEN 5230
  • Dr. Boetticher

2
What is SCM?
  • History
  • CM Origins
  • SCM - Automation
  • Mature Discipline

3
Why do I need it?
  • Reduce Costs
  • Improve Productivity
  • Encourage Reuse
  • Reduce Deployment Defects
  • Reduce Time-to-Market
  • Integral Part of a Mature Organization CMM

4
But..
  • Adoption of SCM tools in the software development
    market is only 20 Ovum Research
  • Lack of Awareness of the State-of-the-Art
  • Problems with Tool Adoption
  • Behavioral Factors WeigersK
  • Political Factors
  • Inability to See Long-Term Benefits

5
Problem Definition
  • Suitability for an organization
  • One size does not fit all
  • Large Investment, Resource Commitment,
    return-on-investment
  • Select the most appropriate tool to obtain
    maximize return-on-investment (ROI)
  • The total number of tools in the market today
    exceeds 50

6
Functionality (Requirements)
  • Dart discusses functionality and requirements
  • Does not address deployment
  • Modified diagram
  • Does not address entire industry spectrum
  • No distinction made based on industry

7
Industry Spectrum
  • Organization Factors - How small is small?
  • small
  • who, what, when
  • small, local, single-organization involvement
    with less volatile requirements
  • large
  • communication control
  • large, multi-organizational, multi-site and with
    volatile requirements
  • Project Factors - Size, Complexity

8
Functionality and Industry
  • Workspace
  • Simple (Workstation Directory), Intermediate
    (Hierarchical)
  • Workspace usage patterns
  • Small - Simple Workspace
  • Large - Intermediate Workspace (Enhances
    communication)
  • Merging
  • Managing conflicts
  • Largely manual effort
  • Small - Parallel development not necessary
  • Large - Support tools, Automated merge

9
Functionality and Industry (continued)
  • Communication
  • Local Area Connectivity
  • Local network support
  • Wide Area Connectivity
  • Virtual Software Company
  • Small - Local network support
  • Large - Wide area connectivity

10
Functionality and Industry (continued)
  • Components
  • Uniquely identifiable components
  • Applies to both - core function
  • Uniquely identifiable configurations
  • Small - Labeling
  • Large - Rules
  • Repository
  • Small - File Based Repository
  • Large - Database, structured storage (Efficient
    Retrieval)

11
Functionality and Industry (continued)
  • Structure
  • System Model
  • Small - Parts List, Labels
  • Large - System Model
  • Construction
  • Build Management
  • Small - make
  • Large - Integrated/Automated build management

12
Functionality and Industry (continued)
  • Deployment
  • Installation
  • Parameterization
  • Instantiation
  • Reconfiguration

13
Functionality and Industry (continued)
  • Process
  • Extent of Process Support - Little or None,
    Enforced, Custom
  • Auditing
  • Change History
  • Trace Changes to Related Documents
  • Summary Charts and Reports

14
Functionality and Industry (continued)
  • Accounting
  • Schedule Tracking
  • Gathering Metrics
  • Controlling
  • Access Control
  • Locks, Lists, Authentication
  • Small - Authentication governed by network
  • Large - Tool Authentication in Addition to
    Network Authentication

15
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16
Taxonomy
  • Onion Model
  • Levels
  • 1. Core functionality (simple version control)
  • 2. Simple process introduction
  • 3. Enforced process
  • 4. Complex, Global
  • Justification for Grouping

17
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18
SCM Tool Survey
  • SourceSafe
  • All Level 1 requirements implemented
  • Supports merging and parallel development
  • Level 1
  • 995.00 for 10 users
  • CS-RCS
  • All Level 1 requirements implemented
  • Supports merging and parallel development
  • Level 1
  • 3600.00 for 10 users

19
SCM Tool Survey (continued)
  • Razor
  • Meets all Level 1 and Level 2 requirements
  • Does not meet any Level 3 requirements
  • Level 2
  • 8030.00 for 10 users

20
Results
  • CS-RCS, MS-VSS, Razor mapped to taxonomy
  • Caveat Level 1 for CS-RCS, MS-VSS
  • CS-RCS, MS-VSS
  • Low Operational Expertise
  • Developer-Oriented
  • Razor
  • Basic Change Management Processes

21
Conclusions
  • CM is a key element in the development and
    maintenance of a software product
  • Investing in the most feature rich CM solution
    may not be the wisest solution
  • General Taxonomy Presented - Guide
  • Gradual Adoption

22
Future Work
  • Practical Considerations
  • Develop Tie Breaking Criteria
  • Model Granularity
  • Develop Questionnaire
  • Usability, Performance, Platform, Technical
    Support Considerations
  • Case Studies Needed to Valid Model and ROI

23
References
  • Dart, S. Concepts in Configuration Management
    System (June 1992), On-line at http//www.sei.cmu.
    edu/legacy/scm/abstracts/abscm_concepts.html.
  • Fruhauf, K. Software Configuration Management,
    State of the Art, State of the Practice (1999).
  • Buckholz, G., Making CM Work for Software
    Development. IT Professional (September-October
    2001), 51-53.
  • Wiegers, K.E. Lessons Learned from Tool Adoption
    Software Development Magazine (October 1999).
    On-line at www.processimpact.com/articles/tool_les
    sons.pdf
  • Banachowski, S., Whitehead, J. An Observation of
    Fine Grain Usage Patterns for Two Configuration
    Management Tools (May 2001), Tenth International
    Workshop on Software Configuration Management.

24
Questions
  • According to Ovum, what is the market penetration
    of SCM tool?
  • 20
  • What are the core (fundamental) areas of SCM
    functionality according to this paper?
  • See Onion Diagram Level 1
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