SEAL Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – SEAL Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: fd027-ZDc1Z



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

SEAL Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning

Description:

Speakers John Bayley and Action Jackson ... to the staff at the Culver Centre, especially Clare Boggis. Complete evaluation sheet ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:260
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 78
Provided by: capitabusi
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: SEAL Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning


1
SEALSocial and EmotionalAspects of Learning
  • Thurrock LA Conference
  • 8th July 2008

2
Welcome
  • Liz Rymer and Neil Humphrey
  • Margaret Bleet
  • Speakers John Bayley and Action Jackson
  • Bev Hoyte, Wendi Lee and Margaret Gambardella
    from Thurrock Healthy Schools
  • School presenters
  • Therapists

3
Conference aims
  • To inspire, challenge and stimulate thinking
    around SEAL
  • To consider the significance of SEAL for learners
    and learning
  • To provide opportunities to consider the role of
    leadership in the development of SEAL
  • To receive information about some of the services
    that support SEAL
  • To provide opportunities to reflect, enquire and
    discuss with colleagues

4
Why SEAL?
  • One in ten children between the ages of one and
    fifteen has a mental health disorder
  • The Office for National Statistics Mental Health
    in children
  • and young people in Great Britain (2005)

5
(No Transcript)
6
Why SEAL?
  • Knowing how to learn how to learn will be the
    critical skill for the 21st Century
  • The World is Flat The Globalised World in the
    21st Century, Thomas Friedman (2006)

7
(No Transcript)
8
Why SEAL?
  • The UK has one of the highest rates of self
    harm in Europe at 400 per 100.000 population, and
    with suicide the most common cause of death in
    men under the age of 35
  • The National Service Framework for Mental Heat -
    Five years on , Department of Health(2005)

9
(No Transcript)
10
Why SEAL?
  • Good behaviour needs to be taught
  • (DFES 2003)

11
(No Transcript)
12
Why SEAL?
  • In an information age, you can chase content
    but you can never catch it - chase the learning
    dispositions instead
  • Mike Hughes (2000)

13
(No Transcript)
14
Why SEAL?
  • What you model is what you get pupils learn
    by example
  • (DFES 2003)

15
(No Transcript)
16
Why Seal?
  • Estimates indicate that self-reported
    work-related stress, depression or anxiety
    account for an estimated 10.5 million reported
    lost working days per year in Britain
  • Stress related and psychological disorders,
    Health and Safety Executive (2007)

17
(No Transcript)
18
Why SEAL?
  • narrow accountability based on exam success and
    league tables....leads to spoon feeding....
    Learners who may have achieved academic success
    at A Level.... struggle to cope with the more
    independent and self-directed style of learning
    expected by HE tutors
  • Nuffield Review HE Focus Groups Preliminary
    Report (2006)

19
(No Transcript)
20
Why SEAL?
  • Young people who are misusing drugs or alcohol
    have the highest risk of death by suicide
  • Mental Health and Growing Up-Royal College of
    Psychiatrists (2004)

21
(No Transcript)
22
Why SEAL?
  • How we are feeling affects our thinking, but it
    is also the case that what we are thinking
    affects the way we are feeling. Our thoughts and
    our feelings together have a strong impact on our
    behavioural reactions
  • (Behaviour Matters 2008)

23
(No Transcript)
24
Why SEAL?
  • By 2020 depression will be the second largest
    killer after heart disease and studies show
    that depression is a contributory factor to fatal
    coronary heart disease
  • World Health Organisation report on mental
    illness (2001)

25
(No Transcript)
26
Why SEAL?
  • The way we think about ourselves affects how we
    feel and consequently how we behave
  • (Bill Rogers)

27
(No Transcript)
28
Why SEAL?
  • High achieving girls are especially at risk
    from the effects of low self-esteem and its
    consequent effects
  • Britain on the Couch Why Were Unhappier
    Compared with 1950, Despite Being Richer, Oliver
    James (1998)

29
(No Transcript)
30
Why SEAL?
Its good when we work together on the topics.
I like our SEAL assemblies because we all get a
chance to take part together.
Its good to help the school become a nicer
place.
Our teachers talk about how they feel.
I like being responsible.
I can talk about myself and how I feel now.
31
(No Transcript)
32
Why SEAL?
  • All learning has an emotional base
  • Plato

33
Why SEAL?
Why not?
34
The emotionally intelligent school
  • John Bayley

35
Break
  • Refreshments
  • Displays

36
Local and national updates
  • Liz Rymer Neil Humphrey
  • July 2008

37
www.bandapilot.org.uk
38
National SEAL update
  • Primary resource is under review
  • Year 7 resources updated
  • New resources available for yrs 8 9
  • Updated staff development materials including
    video clips and case studies
  • Subject specific resources for all available via
    the Standards CPD site
  • Anti bullying resources. Whole school stand alone
    cross- curricular resource
  • SEAL survey live online now
  • Many LA sites have SEAL resources

39
SEAL resources to come
  • Example small group work learning opportunities
  • Mapping against PSHE, citizenship and other
    subjects
  • SEAL DVD
  • More development groups to share good practice
    through case studies

40
National targets for SEAL
  • By March 2009 90 of primary schools across
    England will have been supported in implementing
    SEAL.
  • By March 2009 45 of secondary schools will have
    been actively engaged in implementing SEAL,
    supported by lead practice schools
  • Improved practice measured by school self-review
    tool

41
SEALSocial and EmotionalAspects of
LearningWhat is the picture locally in our
schools today?
  • Neil Humphrey
  • BA Consultant
  • Tuesday 8thJuly 2008

42
Introduction
  • Post
  • Remit
  • Audit
  • Findings
  • Target

43
Currently
  • Four SEAL pilot Primary Schools were established
    in 2006.
  • Chafford Hundred Primary School presented at last
    years SEAL Conference and their commitment to
    the initiative continues.
  • Most Primary Schools are working on elements of
    SEAL either in lessons, assemblies or
    extra-curricular activities.
  • Many Primary Schools are involved in
    Cross-Thurrock projects which support the
    development of social and emotional skills.
    These initiatives include, work with Edison,
    Accelerated Learning, Model Learning and Impact
    Learning.

44
Currently
  • The Ockendon School is the Lead school in
    Thurrock and already implements SEAL across their
    Year 7 curriculum.
  • The Gateway Academy, The Grays School Media Arts
    College and St. Cleres School have all
    implemented SEAL through pilot schemes with
    respective nurture groups.
  • Chafford Hundred Campus - Seconday School,
    Hassenbrook School Specialist Technology College
    and William Edwards School Sports College have
    met with Neil Humphrey and begun a plan of
    action.
  • Belhus Chase Specialist Humanities College, The
    Grays Convent High School and Gable Hall School
    have all expressed an interest in SEAL and
    hopefully todays event will generate further
    development.

45
Support
Neil Humphrey Behaviour Attendance
Consultant Tel 01375 413642 Mob 07917
505208 Email nhumphrey_at_thurrock.gov.uk

46
School presentations
  • The Ockendon School
  • Sue Watson and implementing SEAL across year 7
  • The Gateway Academy
  • Sherryl Bareham and implementing SEAL for a small
    group of year 7 students

47
SEAL and Thurrock Healthy Schools Scheme
  • Bev Hoyte and Wendi Lee
  • Thurrock Healthy Schools Programme Managers
  • Margaret Gambardella
  • Massage in Schools

48
Lunch
  • Buffet lunch
  • Therapists
  • In hall
  • In Room G2
  • In Room G3
  • Displays

49
Workshops-
  • SEAL - what is in it for students?
  • John Bayley
  • Hall
  • SEAL what does it mean for classroom teachers?
  • Margaret Bleet
  • Room G4
  • SEAL - what does the SMT need to know?
  • Liz Rymer
  • Room G3

50
Ive come to the frightening conclusion that I
am the decisive element in my classroom. Its my
personal approach that creates the climate. Its
my daily mood that makes the weather. As a
teacher. I possess a tremendous power to make a
childs life miserable or joyous. I can be a
tool of torture or an instrument of inspiration.
I can humiliate or humour, hurt or heal. In all
situations, it is my response that decides
whether a crisis will be escalated or
de-escalated and a child humanised or
de-humanised. (Ginot 1972)
51
SEALWhat does it mean for Leadership Teams?
  • Liz Rymer
  • July 2008
  • lizrymer_at_hotmail.com

52
This session will consider
  • Why SEAL is so important?
  • How and when SEAL can be implemented in your
    school
  • The approaches other schools have used to
    implement SEAL
  • The approaches that can be used to monitor and
    evaluate SEAL effectively

53
A journey looking for school improvement.....
54
so SEAL permeates through all aspects of school
life and to parents and carers and to the wider
community
55
SEAL and transition
  • Children and young people are often left without
    the right support as they move from
  • Early years to primary school
  • Primary to secondary education
  • Secondary education to college
  • Leaving school
  • Stress, anxiety and lack of support through these
    transition periods is common and worse for those
    with disabilities

56
So lets try it....
  • Transition is something on all teachers minds in
    the summer term
  • Write down all the emotions that a student will
    be feeling
  • Then record what skills the students need to cope
  • Then decide where these skills are being taught
    in your school

57
Why is SEAL so important?
58
The burden of poor emotional and mental health
  • Good learners need good mental health
  • but.....
  • 1 in 10 has a diagnosable mental health disorder
  • Particularly vulnerable groups
  • Young carers
  • Children in care
  • Bereavement
  • Disability
  • Children who have been abused
  • Young people with drug or alcohol issues

59
How does this impact on learning?
  • For those with clinically significant problems
  • 44 of children with emotional disorders have
    fallen behind at school
  • 59 of children with conduct disorders have
    fallen behind at school
  • 60 of pupils who get no passes at GCSE have
    special needs
  • For all children
  • Growing evidence that emotional resilience
    underpins cognitive aspects of learning.
  • Good learners need good mental health

60
What does this mean for schools?
  • In a 1000 pupil secondary school, at any time
  • 100 will be suffering significant mental illness
  • 50 pupils will be seriously depressed
  • 1020 pupils will have an obsessive compulsive
    disorder
  • 510 girls will be affected by eating disorders
  • BUT
  • Only 25 of CYP with clinically significant
    mental health problems will be accessing the
    services they need.
  • Early recognition and intervention are crucially
    important

61
UNICEF
  • 40 separate indicators in
  • 6 groups
  • Material well-being
  • Health and safety
  • Education
  • Peer and family relationships
  • Behaviours and risks
  • Subjective
  • well-being

62
The evidence
  • The UK is bottom of the table overall
  • Bottom for 5 of the 6 groups of indicators
  • High poverty
  • Poor health high infant mortality low birth
    weight
  • Poor family and peer relationships
  • Risky behaviour alcohol, early sex teen
    pregnancy
  • Low expectations and high NEETs
  • Low self-assessed well-being

63
Challenges facing Thurrock Schools
  • Closing the gap
  • Data rich to information rich
  • Stage not age testing
  • Curriculum review
  • Leadership management training
  • Effective use of ICT
  • Poor literacy levels
  • Attendance issues
  • Staff student mobility
  • Issues around BME EAL students
  • Student behaviour
  • Making and sustaining
  • effective partnerships
  • Would building a more positive school ethos
    help?

64
How and when can SEAL be implemented in your
school?
65
  • No right way
  • Lots of different possibilities
  • Starting point depends on where each school is
    now

66
Suggestions for Implementation
  • Exploration and development of understanding for
    each theme
  • Identify teaching and learning approach and
    subject area/s and create action plan
  • Development of learning opportunities in lessons
    and across school
  • Learning outcomes for students measurable
    together with enhanced understanding for all
    staff, governors and parents
  • Monitor and evaluate and review plan

67
The approaches other schools have used to
implement SEAL
68
  • The Ockendon story
  • The Gateway story
  • Case Studies

69
The approaches that can be used to monitor and
evaluate SEAL effectively
70
  • What could we use to measure impact?
  • List as many sources of evidence as you can

71
  • Get some data before you start
  • Performance data
  • Attendance data
  • Rewards
  • Referrals
  • Exclusions
  • Staff retention
  • Lesson observations
  • Attitudinal surveys, questionnaires and
    interviews for students, staff and parents

72
Next steps
  • Explore the SEAL site
  • Decide on what you want to develop
  • Complete an audit and gather data
  • Plan your attack
  • Do it!

73
Lets get motivated!
  • Action Jackson

74
Plenary
  • Thanks
  • to all the speakers
  • To all the therapists
  • to the staff at the Culver Centre, especially
    Clare Boggis
  • Complete evaluation sheet
  • Refreshments available

75
Building a whole school consensus
  • SEAL is for EVERY young person. It is about every
    young persons social competence and emotional
    health, not just about young peoples problems
  • SEAL requires that EVERYONE in the school
    recognises their responsibility for living out an
    ethos based on listening, valuing and
    problem-solving

76
  • Children are the living message for a world we
    will not see
  • Sir Al Aynsley-Green

77
Conference aims
  • To inspire, challenge and stimulate thinking
    around SEAL
  • To consider the significance of SEAL for learners
    and learning
  • To provide opportunities to consider the role of
    leadership in the development of SEAL
  • To receive information about some of the services
    that support SEAL
  • To provide opportunities to reflect, enquire and
    discuss with colleagues
About PowerShow.com