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Poster Production

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Title: Poster Production


1
Poster Production
  • A poster is a static,
  • visual medium used to
  • communicate information,
  • ideas and messages

2
  • The poster has to attract the viewer -
  • visually appealing eye catching and Impact
  • How effective the poster is depends
  • on these factors
  • Distribution of the design elements
  • Use of colour
  • Liveliness of ideas - creativity
  • Appropriate information for the target audience
    - eg a reading level that can be understood

3
Designing the poster
  • Design priorities
  • Establish the information to be conveyed then -
  • The order of importance of the design elements
    has to be decided which has priority of
    treatment

4
Priority 1. Main heading
Priority 2. Illustration
Priority 3. Main text
5
  • Layout
  • Size of poster - usually A1 (59.4cm x 84.1cm)
  • - depends on your assignment guidelines
  • Landscape or portrait
  • Try drawing roughs - try different layouts
  • - Draw a number of sketches arranging the design
    elements of the poster in a variety of ways.
    Choose the most effective solution.

6
Four sketches of a poster
7
Sketch out your ideas until you find the most
effective design solution
8
  • Alignment of text
  • - Align centre
  • - Left align
  • - Right align
  • - Justify

9
  • If a great deal of body text is to be used in the
    poster it needs to be broken up to provide both
    interest and access points for the viewer
  • - subheadings
  • - bullet points
  • - arrows
  • - white space

10
  • Words
  • Readability is vital
  • (how easy it is to read rather than understand)
  • This is governed by these factors
  • Size of print
  • can be a difficult decision - reading distance
    and target audience has to be considered.
  • - Use a hierarchy of sizes eg headings 100pt
  • subheadings 40pt
  • text 18pt
  • references 14pt
  • Upper or lower case
  • - research has shown lower case is more readable

11
  • Typeface
  • - use clear, easy to read typefaces -
    appropriate to the job
  • - Serif and sans serif typefaces -
  • What is a serif?
  • A small line at the extremities of a main
    stroke in a type character
    Collins English dictionary
  • What is sans serif?
  • A style of printers typeface in which the
    characters have no serifs Collins English
    dictionary
  • examples serif Times new roman
  • Bookman
  • Courier
  • Garamond
  • sans serif Arial
  • Futura
  • Geneva
  • Helvetica

12
  • Typeface (continued)
  • Research has shown that a serif is generally
    more readable - it makes large bodies of text
    easier to read - thats why its often used for
    body text. Sans serif typefaces are often used
    for headings.
  • The combination of opposite typefaces is often
    effective, for example the use of a serif for
    body text and a sans serif for headings.
  • - Dont use too many typefaces in a poster.
    Probably no more than three
  • Line length
  • - make sure lines of text dont have too may
    words - long line length is difficult to read.
    (Also short sentences may help)
  • Use bold, underline or italics to make part of
    the text stand out, but use sparingly

13
  • Use of textured background can effect readability

14
Same poster with white background
15
  • Images/graphics
  • More effective poster if graphics used - photos,
    illustrations, graphs etc
  • - but the graphics need to convey an appropriate
    message
  • - appropriate scale
  • - graphics that the audience can identify with
  • Possibly show diversity within the target
    audience
  • (if appropriate to your poster)
  • - old/young/female/male/ethnic backgrounds etc
  • More visually appealing poster

16
  • Colour
  • Use of colour can make the poster more attractive
  • - colour can change the mood of the poster
  • Volume and vibrancy of colour
  • Certain colours have dominance (how much the
    colours seem to jump out at you)
  • - for example bright reds tend to appear
    aggressive, striking and vibrant, whereas light
    blues tend to recede into the background
  • - loud, dominant colours aggressive
  • - paler, recessive colours passive
  • - colour dominance can vary depending on the
    colour it is set against - colour contrast

17
Strong, primary colours are eye catching and have
impact
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19
  • Colour temperature

Blue and green tend to give a cold feeling,
whereas red, yellow and orange tend to be
considered as warm colours Blue provides the
appropriate feel for this mountain climbing
expedition poster
20
  • Symbolic properties of colours
  • (colour association with product)
  • For example colours can suggest gentleness and
    caring. Pastel shades of light pink, blues
    and yellows, the softer shades, are often used.

21
  • For example fresh colours - bright
  • blues, greens, yellows, can be used
  • to reflect vitality and sparkle -
  • sometimes used with health products
  • to stress freshness and cleanliness.

22
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23
  • Effect of colour combinations

using complementary colours can create vibrant,
exciting effects.
24
This poster uses the combination of orange and
blue to create a vibrant effect
25
  • Use colour to clarify the
    structure of the text, emphasising certain
    points

26
  • Try using a colour scheme

This recruitment poster uses a purple colour
scheme
27
  • Beware, colour affects
  • Readability

In this example, yellow type on a white
background causes problems with readability
28
Is the black type readable?
29
More readable version of the poster
30
Production of the poster
Cut and paste
One approach is to assemble the poster using a
cut and paste approach, assembling the various
design elements (text boxes created in software
such as Microsoft Word, Publisher and Powerpoint
and graphics from various sources) cutting them
out to the appropriate size using a straight edge
and craft knife or guillotene and then laying
them out on an A1 sized piece of card (available
in many colours) before pasting down.
31
An example of the cut and paste approach
32
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34
Very elaborate edges to the text boxes - is it
distracting?
35
Another cut and paste poster. This poster uses
complementary colours for impact.
36
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37
Full size printing approach
Another approach is to design the poster to its
full size in a computer package such as Microsoft
Powerpoint Microsoft Publisher Adobe In design
Adobe Pagemaker. You can print it using a
tiling facility (if your computer and printer
software provide this facility) - the resulting
A4 tiles have to be carefully joined together
to form the complete poster. For a better result
the poster can be printed at its A1 size by
appointment with the design and Media Dept of
TLSS. Bring your finished file on a CD or memory
stick and have it printed at a cost of 7.50
(plus 2.50 for laminating)
38
If you are working in Powerpoint change the page
set up to A1 size by changing the dimensions to
59.4 x 84.1cm in custom settings
39
A poster designed full size in Powerpoint
40
Poster designed and printed full sized
41
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43
A poster presentation
44
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50
References Beaumont, M (1987). Type and Colour.
Oxford, Phaidon
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