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Alternative Models of FirstYear General Education Programming

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Title: Alternative Models of FirstYear General Education Programming


1
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
  • Alternative Models of First-Year General
    Education Programming
  • Frederick S. Foster-Clark, John R. Ward, Linda L.
    McDowell, Daniel F. ONeill, and Daniel Weinstein
  • Millersville University of Pennsylvania
  • Presented at AACUs Network for Academic Renewal
    conference General Education and Outcomes That
    Matter in a Changing World, Phoenix, AZ, March 9,
    2006

2
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
Overview of Presentation
  • This presentation describes a new program model
    for our first-year General Education curriculum
    and begins to assess its effectiveness in
    comparison with alternative program models.
  • The First Seminar/Learning Community initiative
    is the cornerstone of the plan to revamp
    Millersvilles General Education program.
  • Students were assigned to one of five new
    three-credit, content-based thematic seminars
    linked to a fundamentals course as part of a
    living-learning community.

3
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
Overview of Presentation (continued)
  • The initiative also includes special Student
    Affairs programming, a service learning
    requirement, and the use of peer mentors.
  • The session also examines practical issues in
    implementing new models for General Education
    programming and suggests both successful
    strategies and potential pitfalls in the
    implementation process.

4
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
Profile of Millersville University
  • Undergrad enrollment of just under 7000
  • 91 fulltime
  • 14 minority
  • 96 Instate
  • Entering fall 2005 class of 1320 students (new
    freshman)
  • mean SATs 1061
  • Mean Percentile Rank 69
  • 7th Ranked Public in US News World Reports
    Masters Universities in the North
  • Top Majors
  • Undecided (852)
  • Buad (815)
  • ElEd (772)
  • Biol (482)
  • ITech (443)
  • Comm (422)
  • Psyc (351)

5
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
  • Section 1
  • Description of the Three-Credit Passion
    Course/Learning Community Initiative

6
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
  • Components of the First-Year Seminar/Learning
    Community (FYS/LC) initiative
  • FYS Passion course paired with first-year
    fundamental course (Composition or Speech)
  • Living-learning connection (Students live
    together in Freshman dorms)
  • Service Learning (15 hour requirement)
  • Attentive advising by seminar instructors with
    support from Resident Life and Exploratory
    programs
  • Peer mentors (live in dorms one assigned to each
    seminar)

7
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
  • First-Year Seminar (Passion Course) Topics (Fall
    2005)
  • Homes and Homelessness
  • The Dream of America
  • Facing Fear
  • Why Dont They Speak English?
  • Why We Hate
  • See brochure for course descriptions binder for
    syllabi. More details follow on subsequent slides.

8
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
Three-Credit Passion Course Seminars in
Living-Learning Community Homes Homelessness
  • What is a home? What elementsboth physical and
    psychological make up the experience of home?
    How does one come to feel at home in a new
    place? In contrastwhat are the social/emotional,
    economic and psychological consequences of being
    without a home? Who are the homeless? Why are
    people homeless? In this course we will attempt
    to answer these and other questions by studying
    the concepts and realities of home and
    homelessness. The course will also offer a
    service learning opportunity as students
    investigate the problem of homelessness here in
    Lancaster.
  • Courses include
  • UNIV 179 Homes Homelessness
  • ENGL 110 English Composition

Dr. Dan ONeill
9
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
Three-Credit Passion Course Seminars in
Living-Learning Community The Dream of America
  • Courses include
  • UNIV 179 The Dream of America
  • COMM 100 Fundamentals of Speech
  • This course introduces students to various
    interpretations, conceptions, and manifestations
    of the concept, promise, failure, and myths
    associated with the dream of America. Students
    will read fiction, drama, and non-fiction prose
    depicting various American writers perspectives
    of the dream and myths of America. By analyzing
    these readings, students will develop their own
    interpretations of the dream of America and its
    efficacy for a generation uncertain of its
    relevance in their lives.

Dr. Steven Centola
10
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
Three-Credit Passion Course Seminars in
Living-Learning Community Facing Fear
  • Courses include
  • UNIV 179 Facing Fear
  • ENGL 110 English Composition
  • Students in this seminar will explore through
    literature, philosophy, social science,
    religious/wisdom traditions, and personal
    experience the various faces and facets of fear
    as a near-ubiquitous human experience. Facing
    fear also suggests a personal challenge to
    understand fear and to respond to it
    constructively, especially with regard to ones
    own education and growth.

Dr. Barb Stengel
Dr. Barb Stengel
11
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
Three-Credit Passion Course Seminars in
Living-Learning Community Why Dont They Speak
English?
  • Courses include
  • UNIV 179 Why Dont They Speak English?
  • ENGL 110 English Composition
  • Although the majority of immigrants to the US do
    not speak English when they come here, their
    children and grandchildren in many cases no
    longer speak a language other than English. How
    hard is it for immigrants to learn English and
    how hard is it for Americans to learn a second
    language? What does it take to be or to become
    bilingual? We will explore our own linguistic
    family history, learn about current immigrants to
    the US who speak other languages, and discuss
    language policy issues in the US and in other
    countries.

Dr. Suzanne Nimmrichter
12
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
Three-Credit Passion Course Seminars in
Living-Learning Community Why We Hate
  • This seminar will investigate the darker side of
    human emotions and behavior by examining hatred
    its causes, its manifestations in contemporary
    society and historically, and what can be done to
    lessen its incidence and impact. A recent book by
    Rush Dozier, Why We Hate, forms the backbone of
    this seminar. Through critical reading and
    discussion, participants will gain a better
    understanding of the intra-psychic,
    interpersonal, and inter-group dimensions of
    hate. Students will investigate and report upon
    some of the many manifestations of hate through
    independent research supported by both this
    seminar and the linked course (ENGL 110). The
    last portion of the course will look at how we
    can respond to hate in our world and the
    conditions that breed it, both as individuals and
    as a society. A service-learning activity will be
    linked to this portion of the course.
  • Courses include
  • UNIV 179 Why We Hate
  • ENGL 110 English Composition

Dr. Fred Foster-Clark
13
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
  • Section 2
  • Evaluation of the Three-Credit Passion
    Course/Learning Community Initiative

14
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
  • Pilot-test Evaluation Methods
  • 110 of the 284 Exploratory (Undecided) students
    were randomly assigned to the FYS/LC pilot-test
    program
  • Pilot-test students assigned to one of five
    FYS/LC topics based on their stated preferences
  • Students completed mid-semester and
    end-of-semester Web-based surveys
  • Focus group of pilot-test students held at end of
    semester by assessment staff
  • Instructors completed opened-ended surveys
  • Students will be followed to check academic
    progress and persistence

15
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
Freshman Year Mid-Term Survey Fall 2005 Results

16
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
Freshman Year Mid-Term Survey Fall 2005 Results
Students in the freshman seminar had more serious
conversations with different students, worked
more with classmates outside of class, researched
for a paper more, contributed more to class, and
came to class more prepared than students who
were not in a freshman seminar.

17
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
Freshman Year Mid-Term Survey Fall 2005 Results
Students in a learning community meet more with
classmates outside of class and tend to believe
more that the University provides them with
needed support than students who are not in a
learning community.

18
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
Freshman Year Mid-Term Survey Fall 2005 Results
The one-credit seminar was rated higher than the
three-credit seminar for meeting with faculty
outside of class and marginally higher for
evaluation of the entire educational experience.

19
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
FACULTY REACTIONS TO TEACHING THE FIRST SEMINAR
  • Energizing
  • I enjoyed a chance to spread my wings after a
    steady diet of required courses.
  • Got me out of a teaching rut!
  • I really enjoyed the opportunity to get to know
    students wellboth academically and personally.
  • Students rose to my high expectations.
  • Being both teacher and advisor made me better at
    both!
  • I could convey to students that college involves
    a high level of intellectual rigor.

20
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
  • FACULTY REACTIONS IMPORTANT THEMES
  • Scholarly Growth
  • Professional Development
  • Relationships
  • Faculty Collaboration
  • Quality of Student Work
  • Service Learning
  • Challenges
  • Elaboration of these seven themes follow on
    subsequent slides.

21
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
SCHOLARLY GROWTH
  • Developing a First Seminar provided the
    opportunity to teach a course on a topic about
    which the faculty member feels passionate-- thus
    the nickname Passion Course.
  • An opportunity to investigate a new area of
    interest
  • A chance to teach a course aligned with a current
    line of research.
  • A timely topic with an interdisciplinary
    focus--of interest on both a personal and
    scholarly level

22
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
  • Faculty members feel energized by the teaching
    experience
  • Faculty members enjoy the chance to spread their
    wings after a steady diet of required courses.
  • One faculty member felt that the First Seminar
    experience Can get you out of a teaching rut.
  • Pedagogies of the Freshman Seminar (e.g.,
    journaling, service learning) can be used in
    other courses to positive effect

23
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
RELATIONSHIPS
  • Faculty know students wellboth academically and
    personally.
  • The First Seminar produced more intensive, more
    intentional relationships with students.
  • Relationships between students were more intense,
    creating a greater sense of community.
  • Fears about not finding friends at college were,
    for the most part, allayed by belonging to the
    seminar cohort.
  • Though it is challenging to be both teacher and
    advisor, both roles were enhanced by the depth of
    relationship with students in the First Seminar.

24
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
STUDENTS ENGAGED ON AN INTELLECTUAL AND PERSONAL
LEVEL
  • Creating a classroom atmosphere in which
  • The students feel safe to grapple with
    challenging texts or concepts without appearing
    stupid in front of their peers and professor
  • The teacher can challenge students about their
    work ethic and intellectual productivityfactors
    that strongly contribute to their retention and
    success in college.

25
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
OPPORTUNITY FOR FACULTY COLLABORATION
  • Collaborative relationships with other faculty
    members very rewarding.
  • Requires consistent effort and communication
  • Requires flexibility on part of faculty

26
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
QUALITY OF STUDENT WORK
  • A primary goal of the First Seminar is to develop
    students critical thinking skills.
  • Students rose to high expectations.
  • Students learned how to take responsibility for
    themselves--and their learning.
  • The First Seminar provided a safe but
    challenging place for students to figure out
    the transition to college-level learning.
  • Professors support enabled students to perform
    at a higher level than is typical of first year
    students.
  • Students were able to be an expert at something

27
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
SERVICE LEARNING
  • When tied to course content Service Learning
    experiences had tremendous effect.
  • Students reflected in journals that they had
    learned something valuable about themselves.
  • Student evaluations indicated that, for many,
    Service Learning was the most valuable part of
    the course.
  • The Service Learning experiences provided a
    connection between classroom discussions and
    real life.
  • New students need a lot of support and guidance
    to make this successful.
  • Most effective when Professors or Peer Mentors
    could participate in the Service Learning
    experience with the student.

28
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
FACULTY REACTIONS CHALLENGES
  • Developing a brand new course involves a
    tremendous amount of work and preparation.
  • Choosing the course topic well. Ideally the
    chosen topic has clear impact on students
    personal livesand can be treated with academic
    integrity.
  • Concentrating on course content and goals, and
    students general academic and personal progress
    all at once.
  • Providing a Service Learning component often the
    most difficult part of the course to
    administer. Identifying service opportunities,
    arranging transportation and other logistics etc.
    requires considerable advance planning and
    coordination with other campus offices.

29
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
  • Section 3
  • Alternatives to the Three-Credit Model for
    First-Year Seminars

30
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
  • Alternative Models for First-Year Seminars (FYS)
  • One-credit FYS (UNIV 101) in linked
    Living-Learning Communities
  • Themed Exploratory sections (Theme titles Risky
    Business School Days Its Elementary Earth,
    Wind, and Fire Serving Our Community Culture,
    Class, and Change)
  • Major-based sections (BSE-Citizenship, Business,
    Biology, Comm/Thea, Earth Sciences, Socy/Anth,
    Special Ed)
  • One-credit major-based Stand Alone FYS
  • Math, Physics
  • See Binder for additional details.

31
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
  • Key Components of One-Credit FYE Seminar (UNIV
    101)
  • Seminar format
  • Problem Based Learning element
  • Information Literacy piece
  • Service Learning Activity
  • Co-Curricular Extracurricular Activities
  • Discussion about General Education/Liberal Arts
    Education
  • See Binder for additional details.

32
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
  • Sample Themes of One-Credit FYE Seminar (UNIV
    101)
  • Risky Business
  • Culture, Class Change
  • Earth, Wind Fire
  • School Days Its Elementary
  • Serving Our Communities
  • Ethnic Studies
  • Descriptions of each follow on subsequent slides.

33
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
One-Credit Themed FYS Risky Business
  • Plan on entering the workforce after graduation?
    Or, while in school? Have you given any thought
    to potential hazards at work, such as violence in
    the workplace? Hazardous materials? Toxic
    waste? Students who select this option will
    explore health, safety and environmental
    movements in industry and society. Evaluate your
    personal risk and risks to others. We will
    explore the social and financial impacts of
    work-related accidents, illnesses, and incidents
    as well as the safety, health and environmental
    legislation passed to protect the public. Join
    this LC and begin your preparation for the world
    of work!
  • Courses included
  • OSEH 120 Fundamentals of Safety, Health and
    Environmental Issues
  • ENGL 110 Freshman Composition
  • UNIV 101 First-Year Seminar

34
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
One-Credit Themed FYS Culture, Class Change
  • What is culture? How does culture impact our
    lives and how many world problems result from
    cultural differences and lack of understanding
    about these differences? Basics about culture,
    including communication, sex roles, social
    organizations, politics, economics, belief
    systems, etc., will begin our exploration. Learn
    more about yourself and gain a greater
    appreciation for the cultural uniqueness of
    others as we look at these issues through a lens
    of current events. Events such as 9-11, the Iraq
    War, Arab-Israeli disputes, even the challenges
    of the Amish in Lancaster County may be better
    understood when examined through the lens of the
    anthropologist. Select this option to enter the
    world of cultural uniqueness and change.
  • Courses included
  • ANTH 121 Cultural Anthropology
  • ENGL 110 Freshman Composition
  • UNIV 101 First-Year Seminar

35
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
One-Credit Themed FYS Earth, Wind and Fire
  • Can we predict earthquakes? How do hurricanes
    form? How does an ecosystem recover from a
    forest fire? How do volcanoes result in the
    novel Frankenstein? This LC explores the science
    of natural disaster. We will discuss the
    chemistry, physics, and biology behind the
    formation, occurrence, and aftermath of natural
    disasters and the societal impacts of these
    disasters that collectively result in thousands
    of deaths and billions of dollars of damages each
    year. We will explore these issues through
    current events (e.g. the latest earthquake,
    landslide), film (e.g. Dantes Peak, Twister),
    and literature (e.g. The Perfect Storm, Life on
    the Mississippi). Be prepared for the next
    disaster and join us!
  • Courses included
  • ESCI 101 Earth Systems Natural Hazards
  • ENGL 110 Freshman Composition OR
  • WELL 175 Wellness Concepts of Health Fitness
  • UNIV 101 First-Year Seminar

36
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
One-Credit Themed FYS School Days- Its
Elementary
  • Do you have an interest in molding the next
    generation, by becoming an elementary teacher?
    This LC will be led by an elementary education
    faculty member who will guide discussions of
    major sociological questions and approaches to
    studying them, with an emphasis on the role that
    education plays when exploring the similarities
    and differences among human groups, organizations
    and societies. If you have an interest in
    elementary education, this LC is for you!
  • Courses included
  • SOCY 101 Introduction to Sociology
  • ENGL 110 Freshman Composition
  • UNIV 101 First-Year Seminar

37
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
One-Credit Themed FYS Serving Our Community
  • Have you been active in your community? Have you
    found community service to be rewarding and
    enriching to your life and your learning? And,
    didnt you feel great when you knew you made a
    positive difference in someone elses life?
    Service-learning is an integral part of many MU
    courses. Within the context of learning
    essential information about wellness lifestyles
    that consider your individual interests, goals
    and life situations, youll participate in
    integrated service-learning experiences in these
    LC courses and reflect on the importance of civic
    responsibility in our lives. Join this LC and
    make a difference!
  • Courses included
  • WELL 175 Wellness Concepts of Health Fitness
  • ENGL 110 Freshman Composition
  • UNIV 101 First-Year Seminar

38
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
One-Credit Themed FYS Ethnic Studies Learning
Community
  • Courses include
  • LATS 201 Intro to Latino/a Studies
  • OR
  • AFAM 201 Intro to African-American Studies
  • ENGL 110 Freshman Composition
  • MUSI 263 Popular Music
  • LATS/AFAM 179 First-Year Seminar
  • Ethnic Studies Learning Community students were
    immersed in a comprehensive program. The students
    were enrolled in 3 to 4 courses with fellow
    participants, lived in the freshman dormitory and
    participated in many other shared learning
    experiences. Two mentors also lived in the dorm
    to provide additional support to students. A key
    component of the Ethnic Studies Learning
    Community pilot program was the regularly
    scheduled mandatory study sessions. Students were
    required to attend 17 hours of mandatory study
    hall. During these sessions, mentors checked
    students completed homework and provided
    tutoring. In addition, the Freshman Seminar
    element of the program provided a one-credit
    experience designed to aid the students
    academic, social, and emotional adjustment to
    college.

39
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
  • Examples of Major-based One-Credit FYE Seminar
  • BSE Social Studies (Citizenship) American
    Studies (Fall)
  • BSE Social Studies (Citizenship) Global Studies
    (Spring)
  • Descriptions of each follow on subsequent slides.

40
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
One-Credit Themed FYS BSE Social Studies
(Citizenship) American Studies (Fall)
  • Courses included
  • HIST 105 Intro to the Craft of History
  • HIST 106 Contours of US History
  • GOVT 111 Intro to American Government
  • ENGL 110 Freshman Composition
  • EDFN 179 First-Year Seminar

41
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
One-Credit Themed FYS BSE Social Studies
(Citizenship) Global Studies (Spring)
  • Courses included
  • HIST 102 Europe and the World, 1789 to Present
  • GEOG 101 Global Environment
  • GOVT 251 Intro to Global Affairs
  • EDFN 179 First-Year Seminar

42
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
Retention Data for Freshman Learning Communities
with One-Credit FY Seminar Fall 2001 to Fall
2004

43
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
  • Section 4
  • First Seminars/Learning Communities in the
    Context of Gen Ed Reform

44
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
The General Education Context
  • Millersville is currently undertaken a major
    reform of its Gen Ed program after 2-3 years of
    study and dialogue
  • The inclusion of first-year seminars in
    conjunction with learning communities has been an
    important feature of this reform.
  • Creating a simpler, more flexible structure was a
    central guiding philosophy.

45
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
The General Education Context
Draft Goals Objectives Students, working with
advisors, and taking into consideration
prior-knowledge and experience, purposefully
select courses in the Gen Ed curriculum that
together with required courses, co-curricular and
extra-curricular activities, and major areas of
study help students
  • Think, speak, and write clearly. Specifically,
    Millersville students should demonstrate college
    level proficiency in the following areas
  • Oral and written communication
  • Scientific and quantitative reasoning
  • Critical analysis and reasoning
  • Technological competency
  • Information literacy
  • Develop an understanding of the applications,
    usefulness, limitations of, and differences
    between, different ways of knowing developed in
    the traditions of math, science, social science,
    and the humanities.
  • Grow in their understanding of people that are
    separated by differing beliefs, values, power,
    wealth, and cultures.
  • Develop civic and social responsibility.
  • Gain personal enrichment by fostering wellness
    values, and through the study of literature,
    music, art, and other interests that can be
    developed and enjoyed throughout a lifetime.

46
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
The General Education Context
  • Outline of Curriculum Proposal
  • Foundations 9 credits
  • Composition
  • Math
  • Speech
  • Explore and More 15 credits
  • 9 credits Explore
  • First Year Seminars (FYS) are strongly encouraged
    and can count for up to 3 of these 9 credits.
    FYS include various options and are typically
    integrated into a Learning Community. Maximum 25
    students for most seminar formats.
  • Except for First-Year Seminars, all Explore
    credits must come from programs outside the
    students major. BSE students may not count
    required education courses as Explore courses.
  • Advanced writing discipline specific sections
    encouraged that link with course(s) in major .
  • Perspectives and / or Capstone.
  • Liberal Arts 27 credits minimum
  • 3 courses in Math / Science (1 lab science).
  • 3 courses in Social Studies
  • 3 courses in Humanities
  • Skills across the curriculum
  • 3 additional Writing-intensive courses in Gen Ed
    or major
  • Other curriculum components stressed through
    advisement guidelines.

47
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
  • Section 5
  • Summary Promising Practices Pitfalls

48
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
Summary Promising Practices Pitfalls
  • Promising Practices (What has made things work
    better?)
  • Getting widespread discussion input
  • We used a Task Force process to re-design Gen Ed
    with three rounds of faculty/student focus
    groups, open campus meetings, and continuing
    occasions for faculty input involvement.
  • Starting small and building up
  • Innovative programming (like the FYS/LC
    initiative) started as small pilot-test with
    assessment opportunities, expanded in second
    year, with full adoption planned for Year 3 or 4.

49
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
Summary Promising Practices Pitfalls
  • Promising Practices (Continued)
  • Faculty development
  • FYE Coordinator runs yearly two-day workshop to
    support FYS/LC programming
  • Outside experts (e.g., Jodi Levine Laufgraben,
    Peggy Maki, John Gardner, Randy Swing, Steven
    Briggs, Ed Zlotkowski, Ed Napieralski, John
    OConnor, Doug Howard) brought to campus for
    consultation training
  • Participation in Evergreen Summer LC Institute
    Asheville Institute for Gen Ed
  • Center for Academic Excellence sponsors many
    additional programs
  • Bringing together academic and student affairs
  • Dedicated freshman dorms built on living/learning
    model
  • Co-curricular programming, often based in dorms
  • Peer mentors provide bridge between dorm/campus
    life and FYS classroom

50
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
Summary Promising Practices Pitfalls
  • Pitfalls (What obstacles have made things
    difficult?)
  • Getting innovations to fit established structures
  • Where do the First-Year Seminars count? Answer
    Currently, one-credit FYS sections dont really
    count three-credit FYS sections substitute as
    part of distributional, liberal arts requirement
    an imperfect solution!
  • Can major-based FYS sections count toward Gen Ed?
    Answer Yes - were working on a system to make
    this possible.
  • Resource constraints
  • How do you lure FYS instructors away from
    major-based courses or large introductory
    sections to small seminar courses? This works
    against productivity (higher student-faculty
    ratios) and takes away faculty complement from
    departmental needs.

51
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
  • Thanks for attending our presentation. We hope
    youll visit our lovely campus and look us up
    (especially during April or May when the campus
    is in bloom!)
  • Contact information follows on the next slide.

52
Alternative Models of First-Year General
Education Programming
Contact Information
  • Frederick S. Foster-Clark, Department of
    Psychology and Coordinator of General Education
  • Email Frederick.Foster-Clark_at_millersville.edu
  • Phone 717-872-3933
  • John R. Ward, Department of Educational
    Foundations
  • Email John.Ward_at_millersville.edu
  • Phone 717-872-3835
  • Go to http//muweb.millersville.edu/gened/ for
    information about our Gen Ed program and reform
    efforts.
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