Missouri Career Education - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Missouri Career Education PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: df562-ZDc1Z



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Missouri Career Education

Description:

... Lead The Way Missouri Workplace Readiness ... Occupations that are math and science intensive pay much higher than average wages. ... New vision for education ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:39
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 43
Provided by: dennishard
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Missouri Career Education


1
Missouri Career Education
  • Student Pathways To Success

2
Overview
  • Missouri Career Education
  • Why Career Education?
  • What does the data say?
  • Missouris Vision
  • Career Clusters
  • Summary
  • Questions

3
Essential Question
Why is Career Education an essential component of
the overall educational system in Missouri?
4
What is Missouri Career Education?
  • A complete system of educational opportunities
    for Missourians
  • Consists of several different components offered
    through these institutions
  • 440 Comprehensive High Schools
  • 57 Area Career Centers
  • 12 Community College Districts
  • 8 Four-year Universities
  • 1 State Technical College

5
Enrollment
  • School Year 2005-06
  • 154,511 Secondary students (54 of all 9-12
    population)
  • 44,523 Postsecondary students
  • 64,405 Adults

6
Expenditures
  • School Year 2005-06
  • State Funds 52,880,428
  • Federal Funds 26,482,005
  • Local Funds 149,765,401
  • Reported Expenditures Only

7
Then Now
8
Why Career Education?
  • Supports national and state
  • legislative and educational initiatives,
    including
  • Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education
    Improvement Act of 2006
  • No Child Left Behind
  • Breaking Ranks II Strategies for Leading High
    School Reform - NASSP
  • Improving Missouri High Schools February 2006
  • High Schools That Work
  • Missouri METS Alliance
  • Project Lead The Way
  • Missouri Workplace Readiness Initiative
  • . . . and more

9
Why Career Education?
  • Our economy is changing to
  • Technology-driven
  • Knowledge-based
  • Global
  • Increased employer demands

10
Industry Data
Skills in math are important for half of all
occupations, while science skills are necessary
for 24.3 percent of all occupations. Occupations
that are math and science intensive pay much
higher than average wages.
Source MERIC analysis of Occupational Employment
Statistics and ONET Online data.
11
Industry Data
Approximately 1 of every 5 new jobs by 2014 in
Missouri will require a bachelors degree or
higher. (4 of 5 will not)
Source Missouri Department of Economic
DevelopmentMERIC Occupational Projections
12
Decreasing Pyramid of Educational Achievement
Sources National Center for Public Policy and
Higher Education (2004) Missouri Department of
Higher Education
13
Planning for the Future
  • Sources U.S. Department of Labor (2006) and
    Missouri Department of Economic Development (2007)

14
Percent of studentswho take remedial courses
  • Overall, 36.4 of Missouri students take remedial
    courses in college
  • Of those,
  • 78.9 are students at two-year institutions
  • 21.1 are students at four-year institutions

Source Missouri Department of Higher Education
2007 Missouri High School Graduates
Performance Report
15
Other Indicators
  • Increasing competition from other countries where
    students are better prepared
  • China graduates twice as many students with
    bachelors degrees and six times as many
    engineering majors as the U.S. India and
    Singapore are producing scientists through
    top-notch undergraduate programs. In 2001, India
    graduated almost a million more students from
    college than the U.S., including 100,000 more in
    the sciences and 60,000 more in engineering.
  • Employers and college professors grade high
    school graduates performance as average or
    poor (Am. Diploma Project)
  • According to the National Association of
    Manufacturers, by 2010 there will be an estimated
    5.3 million high-skill jobs available to
    qualified workers and 14 million more 10 years
    later.

16
What Does This Mean?
  • New vision for education
  • Alignment of Career Education to education
    reform, workforce development and economic
    development

17
Missouris Vision
18
Four Recommendations
  • Focus on School Career Guidance and Counseling
  • Focus on Rigor, Relevance and Relationships in
    School Curricula
  • Focus on Student Transitions
  • Focus on High Quality Professional Development

19
Career Clusters Framework
20
A bit of history
  • National
  • U.S. Department of Education
  • National Association of State Directors of Career
    Technical Education
  • National Advisory Committees
  • State
  • Cluster Leaders
  • Missouri CTE Course Alignment to Career Clusters
    and Pathways
  • Development of Personal Plans of Study

21
Career Clusters
  • A model that
  • Fits our mission to help Missourians succeed in
    the workplace, education and life
  • Prepares students for a broad range of career
    options
  • Employment
  • Technical and postsecondary education
  • Lifelong learning
  • Increases our ability to be student-centered,
    industry-focused, and performance-driven

22
Career Cluster Goals
  • Improved learner achievement both academic
    technical
  • Successful transitions across learner levels
  • Supports workforce and economic development

23
Career Path
Career Path
Career Cluster
Career Pathway
Program of Study
Personal Plan of Study
24
Career Cluster
Career Path
  • A Career Cluster is a grouping of occupations and
    broad industries based on commonalities.
  • A Career Cluster represents the knowledge and
    skills, both academic and technical, that all
    students within the cluster should achieve
    regardless of their career field.

Career Cluster
Career Pathway
Program of Study
Personal Plan of Study
25
Knowledge and Skill Statements
Knowledge and skill statements represent the
skills and knowledge, both academic and
technical, that all students should achieve for a
given career area.
26
Career Pathway
Career Path
  • A Career Pathway represent a grouping of
    occupations within a cluster based on
    commonalities.
  • For example, there are 3 career pathways within
    the Education and Training Career Cluster
  • Administration and Administrative Support
  • Professional Support Services
  • Teaching and Training

Career Cluster
Career Pathway
Program of Study
Personal Plan of Study
27
Programs of Study
  • A full range of activities, documents and process
    that make up a seamless education program from
    school to school within a given Career Cluster or
    Career Pathway.
  • Includes a three-part curriculum framework
    extending from secondary to two-year
    postsecondary to four-year postsecondary
    education.

Career Path
Career Cluster
Career Pathway
Programs of Study
Personal Plan of Study
28
Sample Program of Study
29
Personal Plan of Study
  • A students scope and sequence of coursework and
    co-curricular experiences based upon chosen
    educational and career goals.
  • Arranged according to secondary graduation
    requirements and postsecondary admissions
    requirements.
  • Required of all students in grades
  • 9-12 and is to be reviewed annually.

Career Path
Career Cluster
Career Pathway
Programs of Study
Personal Plan of Study
30
Personal Plan of Study (sample)
31
Personal Plan of Study (sample)
32
Major Steps of Development
  • Industry Validation of Career Cluster Pathway
    Knowledge and Skills(November 2006 January
    2007)
  • Statewide Industry Advisory Councils (January
    2007)
  • Pilot Project Ag and Health Clusters (April
    June 2007)
  • Tech Prep Coordinator Training and continuation
    of pilot project(July 1, 2007 June 30, 2008)

33
  • In Summary---

34
Benefits for Educators
  • More engaged learners
  • Broader community support
  • Structure for true integrated teaching and
    learning
  • Enhanced achievement for all students
  • Makes teaching fun by applying all knowledge
    both academic and technical

35
Benefits for Employers
  • Building a pipeline of workers
  • Workforce is well qualified and able to adapt to
    the changing needs
  • Meaningful engagement with the school system
  • Framework for cross-training or re-tooling the
    workforce

36
Benefits for Parents
  • More informed options
  • Smoother transitions among learner levels
  • Potential savings integrated credit and
    articulation agreements
  • More focused and engaged students

37
Benefits for Learners
  • Relevancy
  • Durable technical preparation
  • Opportunities to explore multiple careers
  • Connected, seamless transitions
  • More engaged learning

38
Career Clusters Can Help
  • Reduce the need for remedial studies in college
  • Increase enrollment and persistence in
    postsecondary education
  • Raise academic and technical achievement in high
    school and college

39
continued
  • Increase the percentages of students receiving
    postsecondary degrees, certificates or other
    recognized credentials
  • Improve students chances of getting good jobs
    and pursuing further education

40
What Can High Schools Do?
  • Reinforce high expectations for all students
  • Provide a rigorous and relevant core curriculum
    to match expectations
  • Personalize the school environment
  • Establish partnerships with community partners,
    higher education, and families
  • Align curricula with state content standards and
    benchmarks

41
More Recommendations. . .
  • Link instruction to careers and postsecondary
    education What will students need in 10-15
    years?
  • Make all CTE programs more intellectually
    demanding- (High expectations)
  • Make sure all students are following a
    plan/program of study

42
Questions
  • Contact
  • Dennis D. Harden, Ed.D.
  • Coordinator, Career Education
  • Missouri Department of Education
  • P.O. Box 480
  • Jefferson City, MO 65102
  • e-mail dennis.harden_at_dese.mo.gov
  • 573-751-3500
  • www.dese.mo.gov/divcareered
About PowerShow.com