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FB 2009-2011 Stocktaking

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Teamwork is the fuel that allows common people to achieve uncommon results. Issues & Problems ... Repairs and Maintenance costs. 115,889. 165,947. 211,134. 127, ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: FB 2009-2011 Stocktaking


1
FB 2009-2011Stocktaking
  • Honolulu Community College
  • April 30, 2008

2
At-a-Glance
  • Total Programs Offered 52
  • Assoc Degree Programs 25
  • Certif. of Achievement    16
  • Certif. of Completion 11
  • Enrollment 7,750
  • Undergraduate 4,100
  • Trade Apprentices 3,750
  • StudentFaculty Ratio 171

3
At-a-Glance
  • Geographic Region
  • 40 of students from town (Salt Lake to Waikiki)
  • 60 from rest of state
  • 2nd largest community college (credit students
    and apprentices)
  • 2nd largest number of classes
  • Only campus in the system with more CTE students
    than Liberal Arts students

4
Our Philosophy on New Ventures
  • Seek Innovative Opportunities
  • Youll always miss 100 of the shots you dont
    take.
  • Flow with the Challenges
  • We cannot direct the wind, but we can adjust the
    sails.
  • Welcome All Parties as Active Partners
  • Teamwork is the fuel that allows common people to
    achieve uncommon results.

5
Issues Problems
  • SUMMARY
  • Declining enrollment
  • Growth of mandated N/C programs
  • Increasing demand in CTE fields

6
ISSUE Declining Enrollments Credit Students
7
PROBLEMS Declining EnrollmentsCredit Students
  • Cost of Instruction increased.
  • 29 over the three-year period FY02-04. (This
    statistic not tracked since 2004, estimates
    indicate that this figure has risen since FY04)
  • Average class size has decreased from 22 to 19
    since FY02.

8
ISSUE Growth of Apprenticeship
106 Growth in 5 years
9
PROBLEMS Growth of Apprenticeship
  • Lack of space leads to less programming
    flexibility, student enrollment, and a loss in
    revenue.
  • Apprenticeship program demands prohibit the
    development of other evening or weekend programs
    and classes.
  • Apprenticeship earns only 40 cents per hour of
    instruction. Liberal arts brings in 3.93 per
    hour of instruction.
  • Enrollments are projected to rise due to industry
    demand and the influx of Construction Academy
    students.
  • Potentially 1,100 additional apprentices

10
ISSUEIncoming Students Underprepared
Source National Center for Higher Education
Management Systems A Public Agenda for Higher
Education in Hawaii December 2005.
11
How do underprepared students impact us?
CC Strategic Planning (tentative)
Goal All Students CC System baseline CC System target HonCC baseline HonCC target
Enrollment 25,260 28,058 4,131 4,638
Pell Grants 24.6 38 17.3 38
Reading 58 80 XXX 80
Writing 64 80 67 80
Math 61 80 58 80
Graduation 2,713 3,638 537 720
Source VP for Community Colleges Presentation
on UHCC Initiatives and Directions
12
PROBLEMS Incoming Students Underprepared
  • Resources must be dedicated toward remedial
    education and basic tutoring.
  • Cost of Academic College Skills Center 674,277
    in FY07
  • In 2003, well over 2/3s of students enrolled at
    a pre-college level.
  • 89 in Math and 68 in English

13
What have we done to address these issues?
  • Declining enrollments
  • Pioneered piloted the Running Start program.
  • Expanded the High School to HCC effort.
  • Partnered with Gear-Up Hawaii.
  • Marketing efforts (encompassing recruitment and
    retention) and funding have been tripled.
  • Apprenticeship Growth
  • Developed partnerships with building industry
    organizations
  • Researching existing warehouse facilities for
    possible remodeling and use as a training center
    in Central/West Oahu.
  • Making efforts to find space off of the main
    campus.
  • Underprepared Students
  • Created new career academies to better focus
    students and, in the future, adult learners.
  • Investing in remedial assistance and tutoring
    through CSC, TRIO (Student Support Svcs), and
    Title III grants.
  • Supporting the Achieving the Dream Initiative
    in conjunction with UHCC System.

14
Targeted ActivitiesFB 2009-2011 Period
  • Summary of Activities
  • Grow the H.S. Academy Concept
  • Nurture Native Hawaiian Programs

15
Many of the fastest growing fields in the united
states require postsecondary education, but not
necessarily four-year degrees. This suggests the
need for more partnerships that support student
transitions from secondary schools (high schools,
career academies, technical schools, and charter
schools) to community and technical colleges.
Dan Hull, Career Pathways Education with a
Purpose September 2005
16
Hawaiis Education and Industry Relationship NOW
INDUSTRY
UHCCs
DOE
17
A SEAMLESS SYSTEM OF LEARNING
  • Hawaiis Education and Industry Relationship
    ENVISIONED

INDUSTRY
UHCCs
DOE
18
Why Invest in the H.S. Academy?
  • Saves students/families money.
  • Career academies reduced dropout rates by
    one-third for at-risk students.
  • Students enrolled in career academies attended
    H.S. more consistently.
  • Students enrolled in career academies completed
    more academic and vocational courses.

Source US Dept of Justice, OJJDP Fact Sheet,
May 2001 15
19
Why Invest in the H.S. Academy?
  • Students enrolled in career academies were more
    likely to apply to college then students in
    traditional educational environments.
  • Career academies provide students with exposure
    to an industry and opportunities that they never
    would have otherwise been unattainable.

Source US Dept of Justice, OJJDP Fact Sheet,
May 2001 15
20
Academies
  • Current
  • Construction
  • STEM
  • Future
  • Information Technology
  • Military Dual Use Technologies
  • Biotechnology
  • IBM Collaboratory
  • Education
  • Early Childhood Educators

21
  • He lawaia no ke kai papau, he pôkole ke ahohe
    lawaia no ke kai hohonu he loa ke aho.
  • A fisherman of the shallow sea uses only a short
    linea fisherman of the deep sea has a long
    line.
  • Source
  • Mary Kawena Pukui, Ôlelo Noeau Hawaiian
    Proverbs Poetical Sayings
  • Bishop Museum Press, 1983.

22
Poina Nalu
  • Poina Nalu is the Native Hawaiian career
    technical education program (NHCTEP)
  • Provides students majoring in any CTE program
    with support services that encompass college and
    career development
  • Advising and referral services
  • Cooperative education and student stipend
    opportunities
  • Peer assistance with gateway courses (i.e.,
    technical math, physics, and english)
  • Transfer connections to four year degree paths,
    and
  • Cultural enrichment opportunities.

23
First Year Experience
  • The First Year Experience (FYE) program provides
    incoming first-year students support and
    resources to successfully transition to college.
  • Services include
  • Learning communities
  • Peer mentoring and tutoring
  • Guidance, career, and academic counseling
  • Financial aid advising and assistance
  • Computer and technology training
  • Cultural enrichment activities

24
HCC-PVS Partnership
  • The partnership between HCC and the Polynesian
    Voyaging Society (PVS) provides a platform where
    traditional and culturally significant methods of
    ocean voyaging, wayfinding, and vessel
    construction are melded with todays technologies
    and educational process.
  • Partnership has led to the Ocean Hawaii
    Program.

25
Ocean Hawaii Program
  • Program goal is to provide students with training
    and education that will lead to a career while
    also receiving culturally significant experiences
    that instill a sense of pride and accomplishment
    and that will be perpetuated through future
    generations.
  • Program Delivery
  • HCCs Marine Education Training Center (METC)
    delivers the education
  • PVS delivers the cultural knowledge, experience,
    and expertise needed to implement this unique
    curriculum.
  • Educational Premise
  • Experience drives the curriculum

26
Ocean Hawaii Upcoming Activities
  • Hookele Courses begin Fall 2008
  • HCC set to launch its own double hull canoe to be
    used as the learning platform.
  • Canoe Paddle building workshops
  • Available to FYE students and various high
    schools throughout Oahu.
  • Summer immersion program for at-risk Gap kids
    to introduce them to the program.
  • Ongoing planning for Around the World voyage.

27
Where do we stand today?What will we look like
tomorrow?
  • Today Are We Meeting Our Mission?
  • Tommorow Predicting our Future

28
HCCS Mission
  • Serve the community as an affordable, flexible,
    learning-centered, open-door, comprehensive
    community college that meets the post-secondary
    educational needs of individuals, businesses, and
    the community.
  • Serve the Pacific Rim as the primary technical
    training center in areas such as transportation,
    information technology, education,
    communications, construction and public and
    personal services.

29
Has the College met its Mission?
  • We create and support new programs that are
    designed to ensure that students are equipped
    with the tools to succeed in college and in their
    career.
  • We develop new programs and curricula in
    partnership with industries, businesses, and
    regulatory groups to ensure that our graduates
    are prepared according to industry standards.
  • We build relationships with major industry
    players such as the US DoD, Alteon/Boeing, Honda,
    First Hawaiian Bank, Cisco, etc. to ensure that
    the College is positioned to take advantage of
    new opportunities.

30
Has the College met its Mission?
  • We are active participants in the community and
    have forged relationships to make the campus a
    fabric of the community.
  • We ensure that high school CTE programs are
    integrated with college programs.
  • We give the 10,000 identified at-risk high school
    students a sense of the career pathways available
    and provide a way for them to focus their
    studies.
  • We prepare students for further post-secondary
    education or for a career.
  • We take risks and are not afraid to fail.

31
What will the college look like in the future?
  • A Higher Education Institution that
  • Understands its identity and has a clear focus.
  • Integrates technical training with the skills
    ethics of a liberal arts education.
  • Utilizes its strengths in technical education and
    training to address labor needs in high
    growth/high demand industries.
  • Continues to actively communicate with business
    and industry.
  • Maintains a strong student institutional
    support infrastructure.
  • Pursues revenue producing opportunities and
    relationships.

32
Six-Year Plan
33
6 Yr General Fund Overview
FB 2009-11
FY 2009 FY 2010 PCR Inflation Furniture Subtotal FY 2010 Inc Adj
Apprn Curr Svc Requests Increases Equipment Addl Funds Total Cur Svc
322.00 322.00 13.00 0.00 0.00 13.00 335.00 4.04
23,395,045 23,395,045 1,030,951 795,477 720,198 2,546,626 25,941,671 10.89
FY 2010 FY 2011 PCR Inflation Furniture Subtotal FY 2011 Inc Adj
Apprn Curr Svc Requests Increases Equipment Addl Funds Total Cur Svc
335.00 335.00 13.00 0.00 0.00 13.00 348.00 3.88
25,941,671 25,941,671 992,106 1,022,869 720,197 2,735,172 28,676,843 10.54
FB 2011-13
FY 2011 FY 2012 PCR Inflation Furniture Subtotal FY 2012 Inc Adj
Apprn Curr Svc Requests Increases Equipment Addl Funds Total Cur Svc
348.00 348.00 6.50 0.00 0.00 6.50 354.50 1.87
28,676,843 28,676,843 913,822 1,124,476 720,197 2,758,495 31,435,338 9.62
FY 2012 FY 2013 PCR Inflation Furniture Subtotal FY 2013 Inc Adj
Apprn Curr Svc Requests Increases Equipment Addl Funds Total Cur Svc
354.50 354.50 6.50 0.00 0.00 6.50 361.00 1.83
31,435,338 31,435,338 898,822 1,253,352 720,197 2,872,371 34,307,709 9.14
FB 2013-15
FY 2013 FY 2014 PCR Inflation Furniture Subtotal FY 2014 Inc Adj
Apprn Curr Svc Requests Increases Equipment Addl Funds Total Cur Svc
361.00 361.00 11.50 0.00 0.00 11.50 372.50 3.19
34,307,709 34,307,709 1,444,822 1,396,197 720,197 3,561,216 37,868,925 10.38
FY 2014 FY 2015 PCR Inflation Furniture Subtotal FY 2015 Inc Adj
Apprn Curr Svc Requests Increases Equipment Addl Funds Total Cur Svc
372.50 372.50 11.50 0.00 0.00 11.50 384.00 3.09
37,868,925 37,868,925 1,422,822 1,556,478 720,197 3,699,497 41,568,422 9.77
34
General Fund Overview FY 07-15
35
GENERAL FUNDPosition Counts FY 07-15
36
Repairs Maintenance
  FY10 FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 Total
Routine Maintenance 69,544 59,544 59,544 59,544 59,544 59,544 367,264
Capital Renewal 4,420,000 2,049,000 8,765,000 818,000 2,390,000 1,673,000 20,115,000
Renovation for Modernization 2,784,000 0 0 236,000 1,356,000 0 4,376,000
Major Renovation 0 0 0 0 4,365,000 0 4,365,000
Infrastructure 291,000 291,000 291,000 291,000 291,000 291,000 1,746,000
Backlog of Renewal 2,620,000 2,695,000 3,059,000 4,466,000 6,896,000 2,948,000 22,684,000
Total 10,184,544 5,094,544 12,174,544 5,870,544 15,357,544 4,971,544 53,653,264
56 total RM projects, 6 of which are in the top
20
37
Capital Improvements
  FY10 FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 Total
Construction - Repair/ Upgrade Main Campus Fire Alarm System 830           830
Design and Construction - Control mold problem in the Library/Classroom Building. 2,530           2,530
Construction - Advanced Technology Training Center     39,886       39,886
Total  3,360 0 39,886 0 0 0 43,246
Health and Safety
38
Tuition Fees
Additional Tuition and Fee Revenue (FY 2009 Base Year - TFSF Revenue) Additional Tuition and Fee Revenue (FY 2009 Base Year - TFSF Revenue) Additional Tuition and Fee Revenue (FY 2009 Base Year - TFSF Revenue) Additional Tuition and Fee Revenue (FY 2009 Base Year - TFSF Revenue) Additional Tuition and Fee Revenue (FY 2009 Base Year - TFSF Revenue)
    ProjectedFY 2009 ProjectedFY 2010 ProjectedFY 2011 ProjectedFY 2012 ProjectedFY 2013 ProjectedFY 2014 ProjectedFY 2015
  Total TFSF Revenue 4,630,290 5,064,179 5,552,126 6,040,260 6,342,273 6,659,387 6,992,356
  Difference - FY 2009 Base   433,889 487,947 488,134 302,013 317,114 332,969
  Inc - Pr Yr   9.37 9.64 8.79 5.00 5.00 5.00
Planned Use of Additional Tuition and Fee Revenue Planned Use of Additional Tuition and Fee Revenue Planned Use of Additional Tuition and Fee Revenue Planned Use of Additional Tuition and Fee Revenue Planned Use of Additional Tuition and Fee Revenue Planned Use of Additional Tuition and Fee Revenue Planned Use of Additional Tuition and Fee Revenue Planned Use of Additional Tuition and Fee Revenue Planned Use of Additional Tuition and Fee Revenue
Financial Aid Requirements Financial Aid Requirements   51,000 112,000 60,000 25,000 25,000 25,000
Increase in Refuse Collection for Construction type materials Increase in Refuse Collection for Construction type materials Increase in Refuse Collection for Construction type materials 28,000 40,000 50,000 50,000 32,000 60,000
Educational supplies, software licenses, etc Educational supplies, software licenses, etc   32,000 20,000        
Repairs and Maintenance costs Repairs and Maintenance costs   115,889 165,947 211,134 127,013 132,114 147,969
ADA Compliance ADA Compliance   9,000       8,000 0
Improve partneship with PVS Improve partneship with PVS       10,000      
New and replacement equipment New and replacement equipment   141,000 150,000 150,000 100,000 100,000 100,000
Create HS magnet for recruitment in aviation Create HS magnet for recruitment in aviation           20,000  
Increase marketing Increase marketing   50,000          
Improve library services Improve library services   7,000   7,000      
Additional Student Support Services Additional Student Support Services              
Total Additional Tuition Fees (FY 2009 Base) Total Additional Tuition Fees (FY 2009 Base) Total Additional Tuition Fees (FY 2009 Base) 433,889 487,947 488,134 302,013 317,114 332,969
39
FB 2009-2011 BUDGET
  • Requests
  • Repair, Renewal, Replacement
  • CBA Increases
  • Inflationary Adjustments
  • Program Changes

40
3RS Requests
  • Educational equipment
  • FY10 720,198 FY11 720,197
  • Request due to
  • 1) Inoperability, beyond economic repair, or
    improperly functioning 2) Obsolescence or, 3)
    New technology or industry standard
  • Repair Maintenance
  • FY10 10,184,544 FY11 5,094,544

41
CBA Increase Request
  • Figures to be provided by UH Community Colleges
    Budget Office

42
Inflationary Adjustment Request AIRFARE INCREASE
  • FY10 198,394 FY11 245,044
  • Projections 45 (FY09), 20 (FY10), and 10
    (FY11)
  • Increase due to less local competition and fuel
    adjustment

43
Inflationary Adjustment Request UTILITIES
INCREASE
  • Electricity
  • FY10 663,758 FY11 854,712
  • Electricity increase projections8 (FY09), 10
    (FY10-FY11)
  • HCC has the lowest gross KwH/gross square foot
    (HCC 8.10, UHCC Average 13.09).
  • Water and Sewer
  • FY10 122,839 FY11 157,189
  • Sewer projections18 each year for FY09 through
    FY11
  • Water projections10 (FY09), 8 (FY10), and 5
    (FY11)

44
Program Change Requests
  1. Achieving the Dream Initiative
  2. MELE Program
  3. Early Childhood Education Initiative

45
FRAMEWORK FOR DEVELOPING THEFB 2010-2011 BUDGET
  • We must open the doors of opportunity. But we
    must also equip our people to walk through those
    doors.
  • President Lyndon B. Johnson

46
Budget Request Summary FB09-11
Request FY10 FY10 FY11 FY11
Improve Student Success 3.00 257,856 3.00 254,856
MELE Program 3.00 491,723 3.00 489,658
ECE Initiative 7.00 281,372 7.00 247,592
47
Budget Request Crosswalk FB09-11
HCC Request UHS Strategic Plan UHCC Strategic Plan
Improve Student Success 1, 2 1.1 1.4, 2.1, 2.2, 2.4
MELE Program 1, 2, 3, 4 1.1 2.1, 3.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.5
ECE Initiative 1, 2, 3, 4 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 2.1, 2.4, 3.1, 4.1-4.3, 5.1
48
Improve Student Success
  • Improve Student Success
  • Positions and funds to improve student success in
    support of the Achieving the Dream (ATD)
    Initiative.
  • FY10 3.00/257,856
  • FY11 3.00/254,856
  • Details
  • 1.00 Institutional Researcher
  • 1.00 Assessment Specialist
  • 1.00 Retention Specialist
  • Supporting costs

49
Improve Student Success
  • Justification
  • The ATD Initiative is focused on helping
    underserved minority students.
  • Increases will be seen in completion, success,
    and transfer rates for all students.
  • Meets System-wide Strategic Outcomes
  • 1 Increases Native Hawaiian educational
    attainment
  • 2 Increases Hawaiis educational capital

50
MELE Program
  • MELE Program
  • Funding and staffing for the associate in arts in
    Music Entertainment Learning Experience.
  • FY10 3.00/491,723
  • FY11 3.00/489,658
  • Details
  • 1.00 Program Coordinator
  • 1.00 Instructor
  • 1.00 Program technician
  • Service agreement with partner Belmont University
  • Supplies, travel, and training

51
MELE Program
  • Justification
  • Act 11/First Special Session 2007 codified the
    MELE program and provide 150,000 in funding for
    FB07-09. The FB09-11 request represents full
    program need.
  • Diversifies economy by assisting in the growth of
    an established industry.
  • Contributes to the cultural and social growth of
    the State.
  • Meets System-wide Strategic Outcomes
  • 1 Increases Native Hawaiian educational
    attainment
  • 2 Increases the States educational capital
  • 3 Increases the Universitys economic output
  • 4 Develops a globally competitive workforce

52
Early Childhood Education Initiative
  • Early Childhood Education (ECE) Initiative
  • Increases the capacity of the ECE program to meet
    the projected State demand for qualified ECE
    teachers and to acquire program certification
    (accreditation) from the National Assoc. for the
    Education of Young Children (NAEYC).
  • FY10 7.00/281,372
  • FY11 7.00/247,592
  • Details
  • 6.00 ECE teachers
  • 1.00 Clerical support staff
  • NAEYC Accreditation costs
  • Contract for database development

53
Early Childhood Education Initiative
  • Justification
  • Act 259/07 report states that there is a
    projected demand for qualified ECE teachers as
    well as the need for workforce development for
    incumbent teachers.
  • Supports the P20 Initiative of which the
    University is a large part of.
  • Contributes to the educational growth of
    Hawaiis keiki.
  • Meets System-wide Strategic Outcomes
  • 1 Increases Native Hawaiian educational
    attainment
  • 2 Increases the States educational capital
  • 3 Increases the UHs economic contribution
  • 4 Develops a globally competitive workforce

54
Repairs Maintenance
  • 23 projects planned for FB 2009-2011
  • FY10 10,184,544
  • FY11 5,094,544

  FY10 FY11 Total
Routine Maintenance 69,544 59,544 129,088
Capital Renewal 4,420,000 2,049,000 6,469,000
Renovation for Modernization 2,784,000 0 2,784,000
Major Renovation 0 0 0
Infrastructure 291,000 291,000 582,000
Backlog of Renewal 2,620,000 2,695,000 5,315,000
Total 10,184,544 5,094,544 15,279,088
55
CIP Health Safety Mold Control
  • Description Design and construction to control
    mold in the library/classroom building (Building
    7)
  • Request
  • Design 330,000
  • Construction 2,200,000
  • The library has experienced increased mold
    problems over the past several years and there
    have been numerous complaints about air quality
    from faculty and staff. When molds are present in
    large numbers, they can cause severe allergic
    symptoms.
  • It has been determined that the most effective
    way to control indoor mold growth is to control
    moisture. This project will repair/replace the
    air conditioning/ducting system, dehumidify the
    air, replace carpeting and install new mold
    inhibiting technologies to control mold growth.

56
CIP Health Safety Fire Alarm System
  • Description Repair/upgrade of campus main fire
    alarm system.
  • Request
  • Construction 830,000
  • HCC has experienced increasing problems with its
    main fire alarm system. The maintenance vendor
    has indicated that the problem may be due to the
    exposure of underground wiring to water.
  • A catastrophic failure of this system will place
    the safety of students, faculty and staff in
    jeopardy.

57
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