Fundamentals of Design - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Fundamentals of Design PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: c6e5f-ZDc1Z



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Fundamentals of Design

Description:

Choose a LOGO that prints well in both color and black and white. ... Advertising Layout and Art Design. New York: McGraw-Hill. Carter, D. E. (2001) ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:65
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 59
Provided by: rick53
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Fundamentals of Design


1
Fundamentals of Design
2
Graphic Design
  • Key Point
  • No design fits all needs otherwise a computer
    could replace graphic designers!

3
Relevance
  • Each graphic should fulfill a specific function /
    purpose

4
Relevance
  • Each graphic should fulfill a specific function /
    purpose

Graphic has no connection to the message
5
Proportion
  • The size of a graphic / text element should be in
    proportion to its importance

Big Headline The latest news from Ithaca College
is that big headlines with a lot of space makes
the headline look like it is cramped. Too much
emphasis is given to the headline and the large
amount of space is unbalanced.
6
Proportion
  • The size of a graphic / text element should be in
    proportion to its importance

Small Headline The latest news from Ithaca
College is that big headlines with a lot of space
makes the headline look like it is lost.
7
Proportion
  • The size of a graphic / text element should be in
    proportion to its importance

Largest Object is the most important object!
8
Direction
  • Normal visual reading is from upper left to lower
    right

9
Consistency
  • Consistency unites the elements of your graphic
    design
  • Examples
  • Margins (same top, bottom, right, left)
  • Typeface (size, color, spacing, sub heading,…)
  • Uniform formatting (paragraphs, indents,…)
  • Repeating graphic elements (lines, borders,
    logos,…)

10
Contrast
  • Creates interest! Light and dark areas, bold and
    restrained areas, white space, are some of the
    methods of contrast.

11
Contrast
  • Tip it is easier to view the contrast of a
    graphic item by turning it upside down (you cant
    read the words this helps you focus on the
    graphics).

12
Restraint
  • Dont go overboard with neat features after a
    while the eye candy overshadows the
    presentation.

13
More on Contrast
14
Color
The contrast between colors (in this case black
and white, adds interest to your work!
15
Color and Size
The contrast between colors and size, adds
additional interest to your work!
16
Color and Position Inside Versus Outside
The contrast between inclusion versus exclusion
add interest and sends 2 different messages.
17
Contrast Logo Foreground Versus Background
The contrast between the foreground versus the
background adds interest to this Logo.
18
Logos / Graphic Identity
19
Logos / Graphic Identity
Variations with typeface, color, and rotation add
contrast And interest to a Logo.
The
Park
Scho
l
o
20
Logos / Graphic Identity
Simply adding a graphic that serves 2 purposes
adds contrast and interest to this Logo.

L
c k y
Bar Grill
21
Contrast Logo Repetition
Ithaca College
Repeating a design element adds contrast and
interest.
22
Contrast Logo Repetition with Broken Symmetry
Ithaca College
The above example uses various colors (broken
symmetry) to add zest.
23
…What is Layout?
  • Layout is The arrangement of all the units or
    elements into a printed, usable format (Magnik,
    2005)

24
Three Basic Stages of Layout
  • Brief
  • Practical Factors
  • Grid

25
Stage 1 Brief
  • Desired look and feel
  • Target audience
  • Objective

26
Stage 2 Practical Factors
  • Format
  • A plan for the organization and arrangement of a
    specified production
  • Format should be determined by content wherever
    possible
  • Cost considerations
  • Size
  • Budget constraints
  • Depends on content and format
  • Poster v. Book, etc.
  • Available colors
  • Budget constraint
  • Black and white v. color

27
Step 3 Grid
  • Introduce structure and order
  • Divide elements into subdivisions
  • Imaginative Stage
  • Horizontal v. Vertical Grids
  • Should be flexible not restrictive

28
Grids continued
  • Margins space surrounding type area on the page
  • Separate main text from non text elements
  • When dealing with two-page spreads, see how the
    verso (left-hand page) looks with the recto
    (right-hand page)
  • Cost constraints
  • Columns
  • Increases both legibility and functionality of
    page layouts

29
Grids continued
  • Sketch out
  • The overall structure of the page is divided into
    units of space
  • Thumbnails-simple idea sketches which will help
    the designer to obtain an attractive and
    acceptable final result
  • Three Functions
  • Graphically preserve ideas
  • Visually portray ideas
  • Compare two or more ideas visually
  • Scamps-half-sized visuals

30
Styles of Layout
  • Symmetrical
  • Restrained and Formal
  • Traditional
  • Has elements of equal weight and tone
  • Gives the Feeling of Permanence and Stability
  • Asymmetrical
  • Allows more dynamic use of white space
  • Unequal in position and/or intensity
  • Can create visual interest
  • Symmetrical Asymmetrical
  • Both symmetrical and asymmetrical styles combined

31
Contrast
  • Essential for maintaining readers interest
  • Also deals with the momentum and rhythm of the
    design
  • The use of opposing elements, such as colors,
    forms, or lines,
  • in proximity to produce an intensified effect
  • Contrast can often set the pace
  • Contrast is fundamental in magazines

32
Contrast continued
  • To alter the pace, make contrast in

color
size
weight
shape
position
33
Pace of Layout
  • Essential for Maintaining Readers Interest
  • Deals with the momentum and rhythm of the design
  • Dictated by the content and space available
  • Influenced by Contrast

34
Pace of Layout Continued
  • Change of Pace
  • Can change pace by varying the images, text,
    angles
  • For example, a great deal of white space and text
    creates a slow pace
  • Whereas, an odd combination of angles, text,
    graphics, creates a fast pace

35
Pace of Layout continued
  • Change of Pace by Proportions of Layout
  • Change Pace by viewing the whole layout document
    as one Unit and altering proportions of element
  • 50 text and 50 Image would be an even pace
  • 65 text and 35 Image would be an odd pace

36
Pace of Layout Continued
  • Change of Pace with Colors
  • Using solid, similar colors slows down the pace
  • Using contrasted, juxtaposed colors speeds up the
    pace
  • Types of Pace
  • Vertical-draws eyes up or down
  • Horizontal- draws eyes left to right
  • Varied- chaotic

37
Whats the pace?
Fast
Slow
38
Action of Layout
  • Action refers to the principle that governs the
    movement of the eyes from one part of a design to
    another.
  • The eye will see not only what the mind wants it
    to, but also what is thrust upon it.
  • The information contained in a design will have
    varying degrees of importance-using action the
    reader should be visually guided to each of the
    elements according to its importance.

39
Things to remember!
  • Your medium will strongly influence the design
    layout. You must know what works for your medium
    before you can successfully design a layout.
  • Remember the three basic stages of layout
    development
  • The brief- content is important.
  • Practical factors must be taken into account
    before the layout design begins.
  • Using a grid will save time and money

40
Corporate Design and Logos
Presentation Media Design and Production Section
1 March 31, 2005
41
W h a t d e f i n e s a L o g o ?
  • Any group of type characters such as a company
    names or emblems cast together on one metal body

Any design or symbol for a corporation or
organization which forms as a centerpiece of its
corporate identity
Dabner, 2005
42
W h a t d e f i n e s a L o g o ?
  • A logo is a realistic representation of a
    companys image
  • It should differentiate one person, product, or
    company from another

43
L o g o C a t e g o r i e s
Typographic
44
L o g o C a t e g o r i e s
Abstract
45
L o g o C a t e g o r i e s
Descriptive
46
D e s i g n Q u a l i t i e s
  • Simplicity
  • Proportionality
  • Small Color Palette
  • Easily Legible Fonts
  • Practical and Usable
  • Originality
  • Works with Industry Conventions
  • Captures Company Personality

http//www.myicondesign.com/Module/Article/Article
View.aspx?id24
47
P r i n c i p l e s
  • Clarity of Design      Sharply Defined and
    Distinct      Unmistakable and Unambiguous
  • Legibility of Design      Easy to Read  
       Accurate Perception
  •   Reducibility of Design      Effective at a
    Distance      Reproduces to any Size
  •   Simplicity of Design      Pure Shape and
    Form      Free of Complexity

48
H i s t o r y of L o g o s
Very detailed and defined Lack of color
More simplified Color is added to draw attention
Company name is added Becomes bolder and crisper
More stylized Brand name is separated
49
H i s t o r y o f L o g o s
1904 - 1921
1901 - 1904
1959 - 1965
1899 1901
1968 - 2000
50
D e s i g n P r o c e s s
  • Long-term thinking
  • Research
  • Spider-diagrams
  • Evaluate Corporate Image
  • Develop Design Concepts
  • Develop Visual Concepts
  • Presentation

51
D e s i g n T o o l s
Primary- Pencil
Adobe Streamline
Vector Graphics
Adobe Illustrator
Thumbnail sketches
52
L o g o C o l o r
  • It evokes an emotional response
  • It has the ability to influence perception of
    companies or products
  • Pantone colors are used in logo printing to
    ensure consistency.

Hackworth, 2004
53
T i p s f o r D e s i g n i n g
  • Pick a LOGO that stands out and is versatile
  •  
  • Don't clutter your LOGO  
  • Choose a LOGO that prints well in both color and
    black and white.  
  • Avoid meaningless lines, shapes and patterns.
    LESS is MORE.
  • Do not use too many colors. 3 MAXIMUM

http//www.logodesignworks.com/articles/ar48_logod
esigntips.htm
54
T o p F i v e L o g o s
http//www.goodlogo.com
55
S u m m a r y
  • A logo is a realistic representation of a
    companys image. It should differentiate one
    person, product, or company from another
  • Typographic, Abstract and Descriptive Logos
  • Colors, Text, Graphics all strong affect on the
    Logo
  • Simplicity, originality, legibility are important
    qualities of logos

56
Pay Attention to Details
  • Double-check your work!
  • Common mistakes
  • Too much white space
  • Incorrectly spelled words (use spellchecker)
  • Incorrect company name or incorrect customer name
  • Misused words
  • Example
  • The whether is nice!

57
Design
  • There is no best design for all audiences
  • The key is to design for your targeted audience

58
References
Baker, Stephen. (1959). Advertising Layout and
Art Design. New York McGraw-Hill. Carter, D.
E. (2001). American corporate identity. NYC Hi
Marketing. Delin, J., Bateman, J. Allen, P.
(2003) A model of genre in document layout.
Information Design Journal. Vol. 11 Issue 1.
Retrieved February 27, 2005, from Communication
and Mass Media Complete Database.
Dabner, David (2005). Graphic Design School.
Hoboken, NJ Quatro. Donahue, Bud. (1978).The
Language of Layout. Englewood Cliffs, NJ
Prentice-Hall. GoodLogo! (2005). Top 15 rated
logos. http//www.goodlogo.com/. Hackworth, J.
(2004). Color basics. http//www.hackworthdesign
.com/color_basics.html. Kear, J. (12 April
2004). Eight critical elements of an effective
logo design. My Icon Design.com. Krause, Jim.
(2001). Layout index. Cincinnati, OH North Light
Books. Lynch Horton (2004). Layout Tables.
Webstyle Guide. Retrieved February 27, 2005,
from http//www.webstyleguide.com/page/tables
.html. Magnik, John. (2005). Typography Page
Layout. Retrieved February 27, 2005, from
http//www.typography-1st.com/typo/layouts.shtml.
Napoles, V. (1988). Corporate Identity and
Design. NYC Van Nostrand Reinhold. Patsula,
P. (2003). Seven tips for designing a great
company logo. http//www.logodesignworks.com. She
a, Dave. (2005). How to Conceive a Layout.
Retrieved February 27, 2005, from
http//www.mezzoblue.com/archives/2003/12/16/how_t
o_conce/. Tech Art Logos. (2002).
http//www.techartlogos.com/principles.html. Whit
e, Jan V. (2005). Building Blocks of Functional
Design. Technical Communication. Vol. 52
Issue 1. Retrieved February 27, 2005, from
Communication and Mass Media Complete Database.
Wofford, Tracey N. (2003) www.layout Effective
Design and Layout for the World Wide Web.
Technical Communication Vol. 50 Issue 4.
Retrieved February 27, 2005, from Communication
and Mass Media Complete Database.
About PowerShow.com