Digital Cameras in the Classroom - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


Title: Digital Cameras in the Classroom


1
Digital Cameras in the Classroom
  • Utah Education Network - http//www.uen.org
  • Lee Baker
  • Lbaker_at_media.utah.edu
  • (801) 585-7905

2
Why Go Digital? Resource from -
http//www.shortcourses.com/
  • Saves you money
  • by not buying rolls and rolls of film and paying
    for development.
  • Saves you time
  • you don't have to make two trips to the store to
    drop off and then pick up.
  • Instantly see your pictures
  • No more disappointments a day or two later when
    your film is developed.

3
Why Go Digital? Resource from -
http//www.shortcourses.com/
  • View images before they are printed
  • if you don't like what you see, edit them to
    perfection or delete them.
  • Doesn't use the toxic chemicals
  • that often end up flowing down the drain and into
    our streams, rivers, and lakes.
  • No more waiting
  • to finish a roll before having it processed. (Or
    wasting unexposed film when you can't wait.)

4
Digital Cameras in School
  • Supplement Curriculum
  • Add to or supplement Fieldtrips
  • Go on an electronic field trip - show photos of a
    distant site.
  • Highlight fieldtrip spots not to miss ahead of
    time.
  • Review field trips with pictures to show all
    students the sights, discuss learning, share with
    other groups.
  • Create assignments with pictures and processes.
  • For example lab equipment, measurements,
    instruments, pictures for vocabulary or reading
    lessons.
  • Use with lenses or other optics to make images
    available to the entire class.
  • For examples microscopes, telescopes, etc.

5
Digital Cameras in School
  • Student Projects
  • Enhance student project with images.
  • Reports, science projects, multimedia shows, etc.
  • Write stories or poems to go a long with
    pictures.
  • Pictures that Reinforce of real world examples.
  • Angle on a house, shapes etc.
  • Capture and identify species
  • Find species located close to home or school
  • Create a local history of sites in their city.
  • Create a time lapse presentation
  • Bean sprout or caterpillar transformation.

6
Digital Cameras in School
  • Assessment
  • Digital images can enhance a student portfolio.
  • Both electronic and paper based
  • Use digital images to enhance tests and other
    assessment methods.

7
Digital Cameras in School
  • Support
  • Take pictures of students and create a Student
    information file.
  • Create a photo inventory of school property for
    property records.
  • Create posters or multimedia displays
  • of student activities and work for open house,
    awards night, fair displays etc.
  • Take pictures for school newspapers yearbook.
  • Customize your displays and bulletin boards
  • Use photos from your school, lab, classroom, or
    images of student performances.

8
Classroom Examples
  • Summer Learning High Adventure Projects
  • Why Cells Work - Power Point
  • Surweb - Egg Embryology and Production
  • Surweb - Box Elder, Scenic Attractions, Bear
    River Migratory Bird Refuge
  • The Powerful Math Curse of Room 30
  • The Butterfly and Hummingbird Garden at
    Longfellow School

9
Digital Image Basics
  • Digital Photos/Bitmap Image
  • digital images are made up of tiny squares called
    Pixels.

10
Digital Image Basics Cont.
  • Quality and Size of Image
  • Depends on the amount of pixels used to create
    the image.
  • Referred to resolution
  • 300 dpi same as 1inch 300 pixels (when printing
    the image)
  • When you reduce the size of an image you reduce
    the number of pixels.
  • When you image is enlarged you computer adds
    pixels.
  • This can result in your picture looking pixilated.

11
Digital Image Basics Cont.
  • Print v.s. Computer Screen
  • If Printing the picture the more pixels the
    better.
  • Generally you want at between 150-300 dpi.
  • If using the picture on a computer screen you
    want it to fit on the monitor without scrolling.
  • Common computer resolution is 800 pixels by 600
    pixels.
  • If you image is bigger that that reduce the image
    size.
  • Using your image on the web.
  • The less pixels the quicker the download.

12
3 Steps to Digital Photography
INPUT IMAGE PROCESSING OUTPUT
  • Input
  • Digital Camera, Scanning, Digital Video
  • Image Processing
  • Edit or manipulate the image with image editing
    software
  • Output
  • Display, distribute or storage of images. For
    example printing, email, insert in to documents,
    store for later.

13
How the Digital Camera Works
  • Image Sensor
  • Instead of film the digital camera uses an image
    sensor, usually a CCD or Charge-Couple Device.
  • The image sensor is made up of thousands to
    millions of pixels that record you image.

14
How the Digital Camera Works
  • Exposure
  • When you press the shutter button on the camera,
    light comes through the lens and each pixel
    records the brightness of light that falls on it.
    The more light that hits the pixel the brighter
    value the pixel records.
  • Once the brightness value is recorded it is
    converted to a digital number and saved on the
    memory of the camera. The digital number allows
    the image to be reconstructed on screen or in a
    print.

15
How the Digital Camera Works
  • Photo Color
  • The original image is only recorded as black and
    white (using brightness).
  • To add color Red, Green, and Blue filters are
    placed over the image sensor to create a color
    photo.

16
Types of Digital Cameras
  • Point and Shoot
  • The least expensive digitalcameras below 300.
  • Fully automatic and littlecreative
    control-that's why they are called "point and
    shoot."
  • Because of the low resolution of many of these
    cameras, printed output is limited to about 4 x 6
    inches or so.
  • The images are ideal for Web pages, e-mail
    attachments, and small reproduction sizes in
    newsletters and other documents.

17
Types of Digital Cameras
  • Multi-Megapixel Camera
  • Quickly becoming the most common digital camera
    sold.
  • Over a million pixels in their image sensors.
  • Cost between 300-1000 depending on the amount
    of mega pixels.
  • Give some creative controls.
  • Appeals to serious photographers who like to have
    creative control of their camera's settings and
    make prints up to about 8 x 10 in size.

18
Types of Digital Cameras
  • Professional Cameras
  • 35mm or APS SLR cameras that have been adapted
    to digital photography
  • Cost from 3000 to 20,000 and more.
  • These cameras often use 3 image sensors, one for
    each color so they capture great color and
    resolution.
  • At least 2-million pixels in their image sensors
    and usually many more.
  • One huge advantage is that most of the features
    (and accessories designed for the film versions
    also work with the digital versions.

19
Camera Elements
  • Image Sensor - Resolution
  • The number of pixel on an image sensor.
  • Lower resolutions such as 640 x 480 are perfect
    for web publishing, e-mail attachments, small
    prints, or images in documents and presentations.
  • Higher resolutions, over 1 million pixels, are
    best for printing photo-realistic enlargements
    larger than 5" x 7".
  • Optical v.s. Interpolated Resolution
  • The optical resolution of a camera is the number
    of pixels on an image sensor that can be counted.
  • Interpolated resolution, adds pixels to the image
    to increase the total number of pixels.

20
Camera Elements
  • Aspect Ratio
  • Image sensors have different aspect ratios-the
    ratio of image height to width.
  • The aspect ratio determines the shape and
    proportions of the photographs you create.
  • To calculate the aspect ratio of any camera,
    divide the largest number in its resolution by
    the smallest number.
  • Sensitivity
  • An ISO is the speed, or sensitivity to light. The
    higher the number the "faster" or more sensitive
    the sensor is to light.

21
Camera Elements
  • Image Compression
  • Image Compression makes large image files
    smaller, most cameras store images in a format
    called JPEG. This file format not only compresses
    images, it also allows you to specify how much
    they are compressed.
  • Less compression gives you better images so you
    can make larger prints, but you can't store as
    many images.
  • More compression lets you store more images and
    makes the images better for posting on a Web page
    or sending as an e-mail attachment. The only
    problem is that your prints won't be as good.

22
Camera Elements
  • Frame Rate
  • There are two delays built into digital cameras
    that affect your ability to respond to fast
    action when taking pictures.
  • 1 or 2 second refresh rate delay between pressing
    the shutter button and actually capturing the
    image. This occurs as the camera clears the image
    sensor, and set the correct controls.
  • The recycle time, occurs when the captured image
    is processed and stored. This delay can range
    from a few seconds to half a minute.

23
Camera Elements
  • Image Storage
  • Fixed v.s. Removable Storage
  • The two most common types of removable storage
    are Flash Memory Cards and Magnetic disks.
  • The number of images that can be stored depends
    on the following
  • Capacity of the storage devise
  • Resolution of the images taken
  • The amount an type of compression

24
Top 10 Techniques for Better Photos - Kodak
  • Power Point Resource Gathered From Kodak.com

25
References
  • Short Courses -THE Digital Photography Resource
  • Kodak Top 10 Techniques A Guide to Better
    Pictures
  • Digital Cameras in Education
  • Tech4learning Teaching with Digital Cameras
  • Teacher to Teacher Ideas for using digital
    cameras in the classroom

26
Class Project
  • Class Project End Product
  • Power Point
  • Surweb Show
  • UEN Virtual Tour
  • Web Photo Album (Dreamweaver)
  • Story Board Project
  • Topic
  • Sequence

27
Places to Go
  • University Campus (Walking Tour)
  • Architecture, Plants, Sculptures, Geology
  • Utah Museum of Fine Arts
  • Free Admission / Only open until 500 p.m.
  • No Flash Photography
  • Utah Museum of Natural History
  • 6.00 Admission / Only open until 530 p.m.
  • No Flash Photography
  • Red Butte Garden
  • 5.00 Admission / Only open until 500 p.m.
  • Marriott Library
  • A Century of Skiing Exhibit
  • Fort Douglas/Olympic Village
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Digital Cameras in the Classroom

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by not buying rolls and rolls of film and paying for development. Saves you time. you don't have to make two trips ... Surweb - Egg Embryology and Production ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Digital Cameras in the Classroom


1
Digital Cameras in the Classroom
  • Utah Education Network - http//www.uen.org
  • Lee Baker
  • Lbaker_at_media.utah.edu
  • (801) 585-7905

2
Why Go Digital? Resource from -
http//www.shortcourses.com/
  • Saves you money
  • by not buying rolls and rolls of film and paying
    for development.
  • Saves you time
  • you don't have to make two trips to the store to
    drop off and then pick up.
  • Instantly see your pictures
  • No more disappointments a day or two later when
    your film is developed.

3
Why Go Digital? Resource from -
http//www.shortcourses.com/
  • View images before they are printed
  • if you don't like what you see, edit them to
    perfection or delete them.
  • Doesn't use the toxic chemicals
  • that often end up flowing down the drain and into
    our streams, rivers, and lakes.
  • No more waiting
  • to finish a roll before having it processed. (Or
    wasting unexposed film when you can't wait.)

4
Digital Cameras in School
  • Supplement Curriculum
  • Add to or supplement Fieldtrips
  • Go on an electronic field trip - show photos of a
    distant site.
  • Highlight fieldtrip spots not to miss ahead of
    time.
  • Review field trips with pictures to show all
    students the sights, discuss learning, share with
    other groups.
  • Create assignments with pictures and processes.
  • For example lab equipment, measurements,
    instruments, pictures for vocabulary or reading
    lessons.
  • Use with lenses or other optics to make images
    available to the entire class.
  • For examples microscopes, telescopes, etc.

5
Digital Cameras in School
  • Student Projects
  • Enhance student project with images.
  • Reports, science projects, multimedia shows, etc.
  • Write stories or poems to go a long with
    pictures.
  • Pictures that Reinforce of real world examples.
  • Angle on a house, shapes etc.
  • Capture and identify species
  • Find species located close to home or school
  • Create a local history of sites in their city.
  • Create a time lapse presentation
  • Bean sprout or caterpillar transformation.

6
Digital Cameras in School
  • Assessment
  • Digital images can enhance a student portfolio.
  • Both electronic and paper based
  • Use digital images to enhance tests and other
    assessment methods.

7
Digital Cameras in School
  • Support
  • Take pictures of students and create a Student
    information file.
  • Create a photo inventory of school property for
    property records.
  • Create posters or multimedia displays
  • of student activities and work for open house,
    awards night, fair displays etc.
  • Take pictures for school newspapers yearbook.
  • Customize your displays and bulletin boards
  • Use photos from your school, lab, classroom, or
    images of student performances.

8
Classroom Examples
  • Summer Learning High Adventure Projects
  • Why Cells Work - Power Point
  • Surweb - Egg Embryology and Production
  • Surweb - Box Elder, Scenic Attractions, Bear
    River Migratory Bird Refuge
  • The Powerful Math Curse of Room 30
  • The Butterfly and Hummingbird Garden at
    Longfellow School

9
Digital Image Basics
  • Digital Photos/Bitmap Image
  • digital images are made up of tiny squares called
    Pixels.

10
Digital Image Basics Cont.
  • Quality and Size of Image
  • Depends on the amount of pixels used to create
    the image.
  • Referred to resolution
  • 300 dpi same as 1inch 300 pixels (when printing
    the image)
  • When you reduce the size of an image you reduce
    the number of pixels.
  • When you image is enlarged you computer adds
    pixels.
  • This can result in your picture looking pixilated.

11
Digital Image Basics Cont.
  • Print v.s. Computer Screen
  • If Printing the picture the more pixels the
    better.
  • Generally you want at between 150-300 dpi.
  • If using the picture on a computer screen you
    want it to fit on the monitor without scrolling.
  • Common computer resolution is 800 pixels by 600
    pixels.
  • If you image is bigger that that reduce the image
    size.
  • Using your image on the web.
  • The less pixels the quicker the download.

12
3 Steps to Digital Photography
INPUT IMAGE PROCESSING OUTPUT
  • Input
  • Digital Camera, Scanning, Digital Video
  • Image Processing
  • Edit or manipulate the image with image editing
    software
  • Output
  • Display, distribute or storage of images. For
    example printing, email, insert in to documents,
    store for later.

13
How the Digital Camera Works
  • Image Sensor
  • Instead of film the digital camera uses an image
    sensor, usually a CCD or Charge-Couple Device.
  • The image sensor is made up of thousands to
    millions of pixels that record you image.

14
How the Digital Camera Works
  • Exposure
  • When you press the shutter button on the camera,
    light comes through the lens and each pixel
    records the brightness of light that falls on it.
    The more light that hits the pixel the brighter
    value the pixel records.
  • Once the brightness value is recorded it is
    converted to a digital number and saved on the
    memory of the camera. The digital number allows
    the image to be reconstructed on screen or in a
    print.

15
How the Digital Camera Works
  • Photo Color
  • The original image is only recorded as black and
    white (using brightness).
  • To add color Red, Green, and Blue filters are
    placed over the image sensor to create a color
    photo.

16
Types of Digital Cameras
  • Point and Shoot
  • The least expensive digitalcameras below 300.
  • Fully automatic and littlecreative
    control-that's why they are called "point and
    shoot."
  • Because of the low resolution of many of these
    cameras, printed output is limited to about 4 x 6
    inches or so.
  • The images are ideal for Web pages, e-mail
    attachments, and small reproduction sizes in
    newsletters and other documents.

17
Types of Digital Cameras
  • Multi-Megapixel Camera
  • Quickly becoming the most common digital camera
    sold.
  • Over a million pixels in their image sensors.
  • Cost between 300-1000 depending on the amount
    of mega pixels.
  • Give some creative controls.
  • Appeals to serious photographers who like to have
    creative control of their camera's settings and
    make prints up to about 8 x 10 in size.

18
Types of Digital Cameras
  • Professional Cameras
  • 35mm or APS SLR cameras that have been adapted
    to digital photography
  • Cost from 3000 to 20,000 and more.
  • These cameras often use 3 image sensors, one for
    each color so they capture great color and
    resolution.
  • At least 2-million pixels in their image sensors
    and usually many more.
  • One huge advantage is that most of the features
    (and accessories designed for the film versions
    also work with the digital versions.

19
Camera Elements
  • Image Sensor - Resolution
  • The number of pixel on an image sensor.
  • Lower resolutions such as 640 x 480 are perfect
    for web publishing, e-mail attachments, small
    prints, or images in documents and presentations.
  • Higher resolutions, over 1 million pixels, are
    best for printing photo-realistic enlargements
    larger than 5" x 7".
  • Optical v.s. Interpolated Resolution
  • The optical resolution of a camera is the number
    of pixels on an image sensor that can be counted.
  • Interpolated resolution, adds pixels to the image
    to increase the total number of pixels.

20
Camera Elements
  • Aspect Ratio
  • Image sensors have different aspect ratios-the
    ratio of image height to width.
  • The aspect ratio determines the shape and
    proportions of the photographs you create.
  • To calculate the aspect ratio of any camera,
    divide the largest number in its resolution by
    the smallest number.
  • Sensitivity
  • An ISO is the speed, or sensitivity to light. The
    higher the number the "faster" or more sensitive
    the sensor is to light.

21
Camera Elements
  • Image Compression
  • Image Compression makes large image files
    smaller, most cameras store images in a format
    called JPEG. This file format not only compresses
    images, it also allows you to specify how much
    they are compressed.
  • Less compression gives you better images so you
    can make larger prints, but you can't store as
    many images.
  • More compression lets you store more images and
    makes the images better for posting on a Web page
    or sending as an e-mail attachment. The only
    problem is that your prints won't be as good.

22
Camera Elements
  • Frame Rate
  • There are two delays built into digital cameras
    that affect your ability to respond to fast
    action when taking pictures.
  • 1 or 2 second refresh rate delay between pressing
    the shutter button and actually capturing the
    image. This occurs as the camera clears the image
    sensor, and set the correct controls.
  • The recycle time, occurs when the captured image
    is processed and stored. This delay can range
    from a few seconds to half a minute.

23
Camera Elements
  • Image Storage
  • Fixed v.s. Removable Storage
  • The two most common types of removable storage
    are Flash Memory Cards and Magnetic disks.
  • The number of images that can be stored depends
    on the following
  • Capacity of the storage devise
  • Resolution of the images taken
  • The amount an type of compression

24
Top 10 Techniques for Better Photos - Kodak
  • Power Point Resource Gathered From Kodak.com

25
References
  • Short Courses -THE Digital Photography Resource
  • Kodak Top 10 Techniques A Guide to Better
    Pictures
  • Digital Cameras in Education
  • Tech4learning Teaching with Digital Cameras
  • Teacher to Teacher Ideas for using digital
    cameras in the classroom

26
Class Project
  • Class Project End Product
  • Power Point
  • Surweb Show
  • UEN Virtual Tour
  • Web Photo Album (Dreamweaver)
  • Story Board Project
  • Topic
  • Sequence

27
Places to Go
  • University Campus (Walking Tour)
  • Architecture, Plants, Sculptures, Geology
  • Utah Museum of Fine Arts
  • Free Admission / Only open until 500 p.m.
  • No Flash Photography
  • Utah Museum of Natural History
  • 6.00 Admission / Only open until 530 p.m.
  • No Flash Photography
  • Red Butte Garden
  • 5.00 Admission / Only open until 500 p.m.
  • Marriott Library
  • A Century of Skiing Exhibit
  • Fort Douglas/Olympic Village
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