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Z Project 2004 Results

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Title: Z Project 2004 Results


1

Z Project Peoria OSHA Office
2
Why the Z Project?
  • We needed to do more
  • Eliminate hazards
  • Improve Safety and Health Programs
  • OSHA share information
  • Focus on positive measurements
  • Recognize best practices and the companies that
    are doing them.

3
What is the Z Project?
  • Working relationship with OSHA in Peoria
  • Participate by
  • Measuring the number of hazards controlled
  • Determine the type of control implemented
  • Share statistics and examples with Peggy

4
What are hazard controls?
  • Guards, ventilation, 2 person lift, additional
    type of personal protective equipment
  • Does not include
  • Housekeeping cleaning up spill
  • Maintenance fixing a broken part

5
Corrective Action Value
6
Engineering control 3 pts
  • Elimination
  • Redesign
  • Safeguard

7
Work practice control 2 pts
8
Personal Protective Equipment 1 pt
9
  • How many hazards did you eliminate last year?

10
AnswersTotal Number of Controls
  • 300
  • 12
  • 240

11
Corrective Action Quotient
  • The sum of all corrective action values
  • Divided by
  • The total number of hazard controls

12
Measurements
  • The admitted number of hazards eliminated or
    controlled.
  • 641 (28 less than last year)
  • Average value of controls
  • 2.87 (2.25 in 2005)

13
Hazard Controls/Best Practices
  • 27 submitted for 2005
  • 10 Companies

14
Submissions for Hazard Controls
  • Advanced Filtration Systems, Champaign
  • Clinton Power Plant, Ameren Energy, Clinton
  • Monsanto Company, Agricultural Sector, Stonington
  • Graham Packaging, Vandalia

15
Submissions for Hazard Controls
  • Peoria Park District, Peoria
  • Marathon Petroleum, Robinson
  • Frito Lay, Sidney
  • Landmark Aviation, Springfield
  • Bridgestone Firestone, Bloomington
  • Greater Peoria Contractors and Suppliers
    Association, Peoria

16
  • Hazard Controls
  • Fall Arrest Systems

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25
  • Hearing Protection

26
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28
  • Slip Protection

29
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32
  • Health Issues

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36
  • Ergonomic
  • Issues

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39
  • Nurse Tank Security

40
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41
  • Interlocks
  • and
  • Key Controls

42
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43
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45
  • Valve Attachments

46
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48
  • Leak Detector

49
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50
  • Safety Vac

51
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52
Pneumatic Test - Incident
53
Incident happened in a non-ExxonMobil facility in
Brazil during a pneumatic test of the tank
associated piping. A blind was NOT installed to
isolate the piping only block valves were
closed. The tank lifted off and was found on
top of the unit!
54
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58
Emergency AccessMaking a Path
  • Wes Beitl submission

59
Labeling A Door
60
Labeling the Direction To Exit
61
Direction to Safety
62
Adding A Compass
63
Finding the Stairs
64
Wild, Wacky and Highly Effective Training
  • Mark Briggs
  • Risk Manager
  • University of Illinois

65
Springfield Tornado Response
  • Peoria Area Office
  • John Newquist, Area Director

66
The Tornado
  • An F2 tornado struck Springfield (population
    110,000) on Sunday night March 12, 2006
  • 94 of the power was lost to the city.
  • The West mall area and the east Dirksen drive
    area were the hardest hit.

67
Tornado Path
68
The Devastation
69
Damage Cont.
70
Damage Cont.
71
Damage cont.
72
Damage cont.
73
Office Involvement in the LEPC
  • Becky Styron (hired in Oct 2005) had been a
    member of the Local Emergency Planning Committee
    since her work with the city. When she came to
    OSHA, she was encouraged to keep her
    participation in the committee. She is one of
    three OSHA personnel in the office involved in
    these LEPCs

74
Incident Command
  • The Emergency Operation Center was in the
    Municipal Building. 20 City and County
    departments were involved.
  • Incident Commander (IC) was the Asst. Police
    Chief.
  • OSHA reported to the IC the first day after the
    tornado. One CSHO went around with Emergency
    response people to assess damage.
  • The Team Leader briefed the Regional
    Administrator at the end of each day.

75
Incident Command Day 2
  • A team of six went to the EOC and offered
    assistance.
  • We explained that we were to assess the safety of
    the sites and would offer consultation to tornado
    related work and enforcement on non tornado work
  • The IC wanted us to ensure that City of
    Springfield employees were protected while we
    were here
  • Daily Press Briefing to media everyday at 3pm

A large grid map was used in the EOC to detail
every transformer.
76
Hazards
Many powerlines down
Debris all over
77
Hazards
Riding in a bucket near power lines
Collapsed building
78
Hazards
Ladder too short
No slide guards or fall protection
79
Hazards
Outriggers sinking in the grass
No fall arrest in aerial lifts
80
Intervention - Tree Services
  • Talked with crew cutting fallen tree about
    wearing the proper equipment.
  • Discovered lack of hearing protection, chaps,
    face/eye protection.

81
Interventions Fall Arrest
  • Many workers in the aerial lifts did not wear
    body harnesses.
  • CSHOs showed employees how to wear the body
    harnesses

82
Intervention Flat Roofers
  • Most of the Flat roofers did not have any warning
    lines or fall protection set up.

83
Intervention Sloped Roofers
  • All the shinglers did not have fall protection

84
Intervention Roof Collapses
  • CSHOs discussed the need to have the breakers off
    in case of power restoration.
  • Warned about hazards of electricity and
    insulation is not a barrier for fallen lines.

85
Interventions - Public
  • 2 CSHOs helped change a flat tire
  • Warned homeowners about electrical hazards during
    power restoration

86
Results
  • 92 Interventions
  • 151 hazards identified
  • 604 employees effected
  • Most agree to get proper equipment or protect
    workers

87
Results
Warning lines set up
Roofers using body harnesses
88
Results
Fall arrest worn in basket
Slideguards used on the roof
89
Congress
  • Senator Durbin and representatives from
    Congressmen LaHood and Obama appreciated OSHAs
    involvement during press conference

Ray LaHood
Dick Durbin
Barack Obama
90
Training Press Release
  • OSHA Urges Safe Tornado Clean-Up
  • Free Training to Precede Active Enforcement in
    Springfield, Ill., Area
  • PEORIA, Ill. The U.S. Department of Labors
    Occupational Safety and Health Administration
    (OSHA) is urging contractors engaged in the
    massive clean-up following two tornadoes that
    struck the Springfield, Ill., area in mid-March
    to work safely, obey workplace safety regulations
    and make certain that no human tragedies follow
    the destruction caused by the disastrous weather.
  • The federal workplace safety agency is offering
    two outreach meetings at Lincoln Land Community
    College (LLCC), Tuesday and Wednesday, April 4
    and 5, from 5 to 6 p.m. Local contractors can
    learn more about how to avoid unsafe conditions
    and refresh their knowledge of safe work
    practices. Both meetings will be held in Room
    215 in the Millennium Center on the main LLCC
    campus.
  • During the initial emergency response, OSHA staff
    provided technical assistance to work crews and
    individuals, temporarily suspending routine
    enforcement procedures, such as citing employers
    for violations and proposing fines.
  • Immediately after the tornadoes passed through
    the area, we sent teams of safety professionals
    to Springfield to advise contractors and others
    on safe work practices, said OSHAs Peoria Area
    Director John Newquist. We approached workers
    who were exposed to falls, working with chain
    saws, wood chippers and electrical equipment, and
    reminded them of the safety hazards associated
    with their activities.
  • Newquist said the immediate emergency phase is
    now over, and OSHA compliance staff will resume
    regular enforcement. He said that roofing work
    will be of particular concern in the coming
    months.
  • The free outreach program were scheduling for
    next week will help contractors achieve zero
    fatalities and zero serious injuries during this
    clean-up period, according to Newquist. Thats
    why we are urging those responsible for the
    safety and health of their workers to take
    advantage of this opportunity.
  • Contractors interested in learning more about
    OSHA regulations and safe work practices may gain
    additional information about the outreach effort
    by contacting William Hancock at the Peoria OSHA
    office at 309-589-7033.
  • Employers are responsible for providing a safe
    and healthful workplace for their employees.
    OSHAs role is to assure the safety and health of
    Americas workers by setting and enforcing
    standards providing training, outreach, and
    education establishing partnerships and
    encouraging continual improvement in workplace
    safety and health. For more information, visit
    www.osha.gov.

91
Training
22 Contractors attended the training
92
Enforcement
No slide or fall protection
Damaged electrical
93
Enforcement
Fall off cooler
Slide off roof
94
Summary
  • Most interventions in construction work were
    successful after being told what to do.
  • Small businesses will risk going into a damage
    building to retrieve records and equipment they
    fear will be looted.
  • 151 hazards identified would not be possible with
    an enforcement mode.

95
Z Project The Participants
  • Safety and Health Hazards Controls
  • Safety and Health Programs Developed
  • Thanks to All the Participants Who Made This
    Program Possible!

96
Graham Packaging Protecting the Pedestrian
97
Graham PackagingMotion Sensor for Safety Arm
98
Landmark AviationEmployee Find-it, Fix-it
Program
99
Landmark AviationDealing With The Dust
  • Filters 99.999 of airborne particles 0.12
    microns or larger
  • The foundation of the DustMaster Dustless
    Sanding System is a powerful, HEPA filter vacuum
    that features 245 C.F.M. airflow and
    Safe-Filter-Change, a Clayton exclusive.
    Disposable filters can be easily changed without
    personal or environmental exposure to hazardous
    materials. Clayton sanders are engineered
    specifically for vacuum sanding, unlike most
    sanders that are merely retrofitted for vacuum
    extraction.

100
Landmark AviationDealing with the Dust
101
Marathon Petroleum Ergonomic Controls
Old.and..New
102
Marathon Petroleum Ergonomic Controls
Old and .New
103
Marathon PetroleumChanging the Climb
  • Towers with fixed ladders and no stairs
  • Stairs were installed on towers in addition to
    fixed ladders at GDU

104
Marathon PetroleumFrom Temporary to Permanent
Fall Protection
105
Marathon PetroleumAdding the Catwalks
106
Marathon PetroleumGDU from Old to New
107
Marathon PetroleumIllinois Refinery
DivisionErgonomic Best Practices
108
American Filtration SystemsTrimmer Beader Output
ChuteNoise Abatement
109
AFSI Noise levels down to 91 dBA from as high
as 97dBA
110
AFSI Filter Can HandlingAutospin Outfeed
ConveyorErgo Issues Corrected
111
AFSI Ergo Correction
112
AFSI Dry Ice BlasterNoise CO2 Exposure
113
AFSI Dry Ice BlasterContaining the Exposure
114
AFSI Blaster Booth
115
AFSI Emergency ResponseTornado Alarm, AEDs,
Emergency Exits
116
AFSI Emergency Response(cont.)
117
AFSI Cord Cable WicketsRemoving the tripping
hazard for portable equipment cords
118
Greater Peoria Contractors Suppliers
Association Safety Committee Risk Assessment
Policy
119
PURPOSE To ensure risk are identified and
controls are in place to reduce the hazards to
employees, and damage to property.
120
A task analysis alone may be performed when the
likelihood that an injury or illness will occur
is judged to be relatively low. This analysis
shall be performed prior to determining whether a
risk assessment is to be made. These minimal
hazards shall be kept under review and reduced
further whenever possible.
121
The probability and severity of occurrence for
each identified hazard should be evaluated. The
following steps shall be taken in evaluating the
Risk of the Hazard.
122
Risk Assessment Numerical Values
  • The evaluation shall consider numerical values
    assigned to the probability and severity of
    identified hazards. These values are assigned
    ranging from one to five (1-5) with one 1
    indicating the least significance of the lowest
    severity of occurrence and five 5 being the
    highest severity of occurrence. The evaluation
    system is shown in tabular form on the risk
    assessment.
  • The numerical value of probability shall be
    multiplied times the numerical value of the
    severity for a total score. The following
    evaluations of risk shall apply
  • 1. Score 1-5 Low
  • 2. Score 6-9 Medium
  • 3. Score 10-12 High
  • 4. Score 13-25 Critical
  • Zero Risk is Non-Existent

123
Critical Risks can not be tolerated. No work
shall be performed until action is taken to
reduce the level of risk to as low as reasonably
practical.
124
High Risks should be reviewed by a competent
person to eliminate or reduce the risk through
engineering or administrative controls to a
level as low as reasonably practical.
125
Medium Risks and risks involving Regulatory
Requirements shall be considered Significant
Aspects that can be controlled through
the application of Operational Controls of the
Environmental, Health and Safety, such as work
instructions and training.
126
Low Risks shall be considered as Non-Significant
Aspects but should be kept under review and
further reduced whenever reasonably practicable.
127
Control measures may be proactive, in which the
severity of a hazardous event occurring is
reduced, or the measures may be reactive in which
the control of the consequences of the hazards is
reduced.
128
A combination of control measures may be
utilized, but choice of control measures shall be
applied according to the following hierarchy as
reasonably practicable
129
Eliminate the hazard.
130
Substitute with equipment, processes, materials,
or procedures that are less hazardous.
131
Isolate hazards so as to protect the whole
workforce.
132
Engineering Controls (Safety Devices)
Top Rail Mid- Rail Toeboard
133
Reduce the hazard by minimizing exposure time,
numbers of people at risk, or similar activities.
134
Utilize safe systems of work by using procedural
or other controls including work permits,
inspection regimes, preventative maintenance, or
similar activities.
  • Read the OSHA poster
  • Follow the employers safety and health rules and
    wear or use all required gear and equipment
  • Follow safe work practices for your job, as
    directed by your employer
  • Report hazardous conditions to a supervisor or
    safety committee
  • Report hazardous conditions to OSHA, if employers
    do not fix them

135
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
If a risk cannot be entirely eliminated and
preventative measures are not feasible,
protective measures shall be the next
consideration. Protection deals with reducing
the severity of an incident after the onset.
These measures include PPE. EG Respirators,
body harness and lanyard, safety net, etc.
Body Part Protection
136
Competent person means one who is capable of
identifying existing and predictable hazards in
the surroundings or working conditions which are
unsanitary, hazardous or dangerous to employees,
and who has authorization to take prompt
corrective measures to eliminate them.
137
Why NOT Safety?
For more detailed information in determining your
companys risk, it is recommended you refer to
138
the NCCI (National Council on Compensation
Insurance) Class Codes for Cost
139
or your companys EMR (Experience Modification
Rate) for incidents
140
Risk Assessment Scoring Assign Probability Score
(P) to the hazard using the following
guidelines
141
Some Probability Considerations a. Number of
workers exposed to the hazard(s). b. Frequency
of/or duration of employee(s) exposure. c. Employe
e(s) proximity to the hazardous
conditions. d. Other pertinent working conditions
that could affect the seriousness of the
hazard(s), e.g. weather conditions.
142
Assign Severity Score (S) to the hazard from
the following table, using the figure for the
worst possible case.
  The Risk Scoring (RS) for the hazard is
calculated by multiplying P (probability) by S
(Severity).  
143
I.
Method Statement/Risk Assessment  
Method
 
144
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145
Signature
Date
146
Risk Assessment
  • Conducted prior to beginning project.
  • Eliminate down time.
  • Anticipate required tools or equipment.
  • Discourages the tendency to improvise.

147
OSHA regulations will compliment the Risk
Assessment process however, these standards need
to be viewed as minimum requirements.
By identifying hazards, developing solutions, and
setting goals, one will have a better perception
of hazards and the risk involved.
148
SUMMARY
149
THE MAJOR BENEFITS OF A RISK ASSESSMENT ARE
REALIZED AFTER THEIR COMPLETION HOWEVER, EVEN
DURING THE DEVELOPMENT, THEY PLAY A SIGNIFICANT
ROLE IN MAXIMIZING EFFICIENCY AND SAFETY.
   
   
   
150
EMPLOYEES INVOLVED IN RISK ASSESSMENTS FREQUENTLY
DEMONSTRATE IMPROVED SAFETY KNOWLEDGE AND
ATTITUDES !
   
   
   
151
Hexavalent Chromium
  • Minimizing Exposure
  • Presented by
  • George Hall
  • Clinton Power Station
  • Amergen Energy-Exelon Nuclear
  • OSHA Z Project
  • May 2, 2006 Richland Community College

152
  • Chromium hexavalent (CrVI) compounds, often
    called hexavalent chromium, exist in several
    forms.
  • Chromates are often used as pigments for
  • Photography
  • Pyrotechnics
  • Dyes/paints/inks
  • Plastics

153
  • They can also be used for stainless steel
    production, textile dyes, wood preservation,
    leather tanning, and as anti-corrosion coatings.

154
  • Exposures to hexavalent chromium are addressed in
    specific standards for the general industry,
    shipyard employment, marine terminals, and the
    construction industry. This presentation
    highlights a control methods related to
    hexavalent chromium and other metal fumes related
    to welding. It also includes practical ways to
    minimize exposure when welding.

155
  • Workers in many different occupations are exposed
    to hexavalent chromium. Occupational exposures
    occur mainly among workers who handle pigments
    containing dry chromate, spray paints and
    coatings containing chromate, operate chrome
    plating baths, and weld or cut metals containing
    chromium, such as stainless steel.

156
  • Health Effects Calcium chromate, chromium
    trioxide, lead chromate, strontium chromate, and
    zinc chromate are known human carcinogens. An
    increase in incidence of lung cancer has been
    observed among workers in industries that produce
    chromate and manufacture pigments containing
    chromate. An increased rate of lung cancer has
    also been reported among producers and consumers
    of pigment containing chromate. One study of
    chromium-nickel alloy foundry workers showed a
    statistically significant increase in lung
    cancers. Cancer
  • Hexavalent chromium is considered a potential
    lung carcinogen. Studies of workers in the
    chromate production, plating, and pigment
    industries consistently show increased rates of
    lung cancer.
  • Eyes
  • Direct eye contact with chromic acid or chromate
    dusts can cause permanent eye damage.
  • Respiratory Tract
  • Hexavalent chromium can irritate the nose,
    throat, and lungs. Repeated or prolonged exposure
    can damage the mucous membranes of the nasal
    passages and result in ulcers. In severe cases,
    exposure causes perforation of the septum (the
    wall separating the nasal passages).

157
  • The primary means of human exposure to hexavalent
    chromium and chromate salts are inhalation,
    ingestion, and skin contact. Hexavalent chromium
    can be inhaled when hexavalent chromium dust,
    mist, or fumes are in the air.
  • Particles of chromium dust can contaminate hands,
    clothing, beards, food, and beverages. Ensure
    good personal hygiene practices are in place
    before and after working in the area.

158
  • OSHA Method NumberID-215 (This method supersedes
    ID-103)Matrix Air OSHA Permissible Exposure
    Limit (proposed)    Hexavalent Chromium
    Cr(VI)    Time Weighted Average (TWA)   
    Action Level (AL)0.50 µg/m30.25 µg/m3
  • Collection Device An air sample is collected
    using a 37-mm diameter polyvinyl chloride (PVC)
    filter (5-µm pore size) contained in a
    polystyrene cassette. A calibrated sampling pump
    is used to draw a representative air sample from
    the breathing zone of an employee through the
    cassette and collect particulate on the filter.
    Then sent to a reputable laboratory for analysis.

159
  • There are several ways to reduce exposure to
    hexavalent chromium. Recommended controls vary
    from operation to operation. Each space is
    different.
  • The preferred approach as required by the OSHA
    standard is to use engineering controls such as
    ventilation, wetting the area or equipment or
    both and process modification.
  • If these controls are not sufficient, other
    controls may be implemented, including the use of
    respirators, eye protection, showering, and
    changing into street clothes before leaving the
    plant. Know the details of YOUR process at your
    site is essential. Review other data, but know
    your data and the basis for the numbers, and why.

160
  • Use local exhaust ventilation where possible for
    all welding and cutting operations. Further, if
    stainless steel welding or cutting is done in an
    "enclosed space" where using local exhaust
    ventilation is impractical, approved respirators
    must be worn unless you can show that the general
    ventilation is sufficient to maintain exposures
    below the OSHA exposure limit. This means that
    sampling will show where you are for your process
    and or what adjustments are needed.
  • You want to know if your engineering controls are
    effective, (filter loading, etc) and if you are
    using other protection, (e.g., respirators), then
    you want to be sure you are not exceeding the
    protection factor for the respirator.

161
Clinton Results Sample data has been taken from a
variety of field sample data, and control body
sampling on specific weld rod and base
metals. Results show a higher Chromium component
for stainless steel welding compared to non
stainless or Chrome Alloy metals. The overall
results and historical data also show that proper
use of engineering controls, wetting the area,
local ventilation capture have shown that
engineering controls can allow weld fumes as well
as Chromium Hexavalent to be managed at levels
below the OSHA standard permissible exposure
limit (PEL).
162
Updated Weld Rod/base metal exposure data study
(Needs to be site specific) Understand exposure
rates for each Weld rod type Base metal
type Weld Method Type For Your Application at
Your Site.
163
Design your protection scheme based on Sample
Data Exposure Assessments History Changes in
components or work type.
164
Finally Monitor the results of your
controls Make adjustments Perform Exposure
Assessments Review the Process (start over)
Review Update Sample History The station
performed a comprehensive weld panel study in Dec
2005. It was conducted by an independent
Industrial hygiene company lab on site. This
allowed us to update our baseline weld scan data
and review it against the new levels for
hexavalent chromium. (1ug/m) Use this new data
for planning on SS weld repairs during our
refueling outage.
165
C1R10 Refueling Outage Condenser Maintenance
Putting methods into practice During our
shutdown, several stainless steel repairs were
needed to be made inside our condenser. A
comprehensive ventilation plan was put in place
to ensure that weld fumes were removed from the
area. This required a team approach with
involvement of workers, supervisors, and safety.
We used general area and local ventilation.
166
C1R10 Refueling Outage Condenser Maintenance
Putting methods into practice The use of large
general area HEPA ventilation and local weld
fume eaters were purchased to keep
exposures as low as achievable by Removing weld
fumes in the area. Over 20,000 cfm of HEPA
Ventilation was used to remove fumes from the
area. Sample monitoring showed that levels were
being maintained very low, (almost
non-detectable).
167
C1R10 Refueling Outage Condenser Maintenance
Putting methods into practice Air sample
monitoring, for general area conditions, local
breathing zone sampling, and blank samples allow
us to determine how effective our engineering
controls are. Monitoring filter loading and
rotating units allowed us to manage
filtration. All weld panel constituents were
well below levels of concern (PEL). Its really
about keeping our workers safe.
168
Questions?
Thank You
169
CLINTON POWER STATION
  • REMOTE BREAKER RACKING
  • Taking the Next Step
  • in Electrical Safety
  • OSHA Z Project
  • May 2, 2006
  • Richland Community College
  • George Hall, Clinton Power Station
  • Amergen Energy, L.L.C.

170
Background
  • Problem Statement
  • Arc flash calculations for Division 3, 4160 VAC,
    Bus 1C1 switchgear prohibit energized local
    racking. De-energization of the 1C1 bus for
    breaker racking during system outage windows will
    challenge Operations, drive CPS into Nuclear Risk
    Condition Orange, and adversely affect the INPO
    Index.
  • Selected Solution
  • Implement Siemens SARRACS (remote breaker
    racking) technology that will remove Operations
    individuals from arc flash zone of damage, will
    maintain Division 3 safety system operability,
    and will offer protection against breaker racking
    damage.

171
Division 3 (1C1) Switchgear
  • General Electric Switchgear with GE MagneBlast
    Breakers

172
Division 3 (1C1) Switchgear
  • Arc Flash Boundary is an impressive 79.4 feet for
    this switchgear as a result of being designed to
    tolerate high bus through current for High
    Pressure Core Spray pump/motor starts.

173
SARRACS Connection
  • Operations aligning unit. Shown above verifying
    breaker identifier with remote (hand-held)
    console and procedure.

174
SARRACS Racking
  • SARRACS connected to cubicle and ready to
    perform remote racking. Time to leave the area
    with the remote .

175
SARRACS Racking
  • This was our staging area. Ill take a picture
    of the Operator standing here with the remote
    console 80 feet from the cubicle on Thursday
    when we rack the breaker back in. Shown at right
    is an ALARA video station that we will use to
    videotape the next racking evolution.

176
HAZARD AVOIDANCESan Onofre Nuclear Station
Cubicle Damage from Arc and Fire
177
Cost and benefits
Cost to purchase remote breaker racking tool
5K Training at the Maintenance Learning Center
8K Vendor Support (Seimens) 10K Ability to
rack electrical breakers live to maintain
Optimal nuclear system safety and remove the
worker from the area, and the hazard.. PRICELESS
. THANK YOU
178
Bridgestone Firestone5 Shaper Fall Hazard
179
Bridgestone FirestoneControlling the hazard
180
Bridgestone FirestoneChange to Heptane
  • Class IB liquid
  • Higher flashpoint than previous liquid
  • 30 degrees F. vs. 15 degrees F.
  • Additional fire safety activities
  • Grounding of equipment
  • Redirection/Addition of Fans to dissipate vapors

181
Bridgestone FirestoneMachine Guarding Controls
182
Frito LayRailcar Fall Protection
183
Frito LayRolling the I-Beams Together
184
Frito Lay2005 Safety Projects
  • Replace pneumatic blower mufflers and reduced
    noise level by 12 dBA
  • Aluminum Bands Installed Around the Tops of Silos
  • Fall Protection above Railcars
  • Noise Reduction Equipment Is Being Tested On Dust
    Control Fans
  • Container Fumigation Area
  • Purchased Fall Protection
  • Implemented Supplier Delivery Schedule

185
New IDOT Fixed Ladders
Peoria Park District
186
Fixed Ladder Improvements
  • Fall Hazard with 20 interior fixed ladder
  • Ladder Improvements (River Plex)
  • Before un-caged
  • After Prefabricated cage installed
  • Cost 3,500.00

Peoria Park District
187
New Ergo Friendly Tables
After 20 46 Tables and Transfer Cart (cost
10,000)
Before 65 Tables
46 Table
A back injury exposure A foot pinch/crush threat
6 tables for classroom setup 8 for events setup
Peoria Park District
188
Three New AEDs in 2005
  • Hazard
  • Cardiac Arrest
  • Added to 22 owned previously
  • Success Stories
  • Golfer July 2003
  • Emp. April 2005
  • Both revived before EMT transport

Cost 1,500.00
Peoria Park District
189
Monsanto - Stonington
190
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191
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192
Recognition
193
Alveoli AwardFor Your Health
194
Congratulations!!!!
  • Advanced Filtration Systems, Inc.
  • Submitted by Dick Jessie

195
AFSI Dry Ice BlasterContaining the Exposure To
CO2 and Noise
196
Lifesaver AwardCould Actually Save a Life
197
Lifesaver AwardActions that Could Save a Life
  • Congratulations!!
  • Marathon Petroleum
  • Submitted by Kathleen Isom

198
Marathon PetroleumFall Hazards Made SaferGDU
from Old to New
199
Pluto AwardInnovation Saves Lives
200
Pluto Award
  • Congratulations!!
  • Graham Packaging
  • Submitted by Christopher Hackman

201
Graham Packaging Protecting the PedestrianAn
Employee Directed Intervention
202
Area Directors ChoiceGoing Beyond the Standards
203
Area Directors Choice
  • Congratulations!!
  • Monsanto Company, Stonington
  • Submitted by Richard Declerck

204
  • Monsanto
  • Addressing Ergo
  • and
  • Mechanical Issues
  • in a
  • Bag Opener

205
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206
Z Project Conference for 2007
  • May 1, 2007
  • 2006 Results Due April 6, 2007 to
    zweber.peggy_at_dol.gov
  • Richland Community College, Schilling Center,
    Decatur, Illinois
  • Participants free
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