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Communitybased Strategic Planning for Economic and Community Development

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Lorraine Hingston Roach, President. The Hingston Roach Group, Inc. AGENDA ... Jack Welch, former CEO, General Electric. Lorraine Roach. The Hingston Roach Group, Inc. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Communitybased Strategic Planning for Economic and Community Development


1
Community-based Strategic Planning for Economic
and Community Development
  • December 14, 2005
  • Lorraine Hingston Roach, President
  • The Hingston Roach Group, Inc.

2
AGENDA
  • Why Community-Based Planning?
  • Other planning methods
  • Economic vs. Community Development
  • National International Trends in E.D.
  • Community-Based Planning Process
  • Resources for Economic Community Development
  • Economic Community Development Players in Idaho
  • Potential Roles for Extension

3
Why Community-Based Strategic Planning?
  • Community-Based
  • vs.
  • Traditional Planning

4
Community-Based Planning
  • A planning process that emphasizes outreach to
    engage all stakeholders
  • Focuses on awareness-building, community values
  • Elected officials planners become staff
  • Broad access means to participate
  • Broad community participation in all phases of
    planning

An Informed Majority Will Make a Good Decision
5
Traditional Planning Method (Comp Plans, NEPA,
Transportation, etc.)
  • Identify Problem(s)
  • Set Goals Policies
  • Identify Evaluate Alternatives
  • Select Best Alternative(s)
  • Implement
  • Method is top-down, often results in conflict,
    appeals, lawsuits, etc.

Citizens Usually Engaged Here
6
Community-Based Planning
  • Define Community Values
  • Evaluate Existing Conditions Socio-economic
    trends, SWOT
  • Define Vision, Goals, Objectives
  • Clarify Target Markets
  • Identify Alternatives/Actions
  • Evaluate/Select Alternatives, Prioritize Actions
  • Implement
  • Monitor Adjust Planning Elements

Citizens Informed Engaged At Every Step
7
Outreach Methods
Recruit Engage Inform Guide Decide Collaborate
  • Interviews
  • Open Houses
  • Workshops, charettes
  • Phone calls
  • Personal Visits
  • Personal Letters
  • Newsletters
  • Website
  • Surveys, focus groups
  • Civic meetings guest speaker/listener
  • Recruitment of missing interest groups
  • Media relations ongoing updates/articles
  • Citizen planners steering committee,
    subcommittees

8
Community vs. Economic Development
  • What is the Difference?

9
Community vs. Economic Development
  • Community Development
  • Focused on improving quality of life
  • Focused on needs of residents
  • Concerned with housing, social services,
    education, health care, recreation, etc.
  • Economic Development
  • Focused on improving standard of living
  • Focused on needs of businesses
  • Concerned with business climate, workforce,
    transportation, infra-structure, etc.

Are interdependent, but slightly different focus
10
What Does E.D. Strategic Planning Try to
Accomplish?
  • Understand trends affecting the community
  • Identify top priority issues, challenges
    opportunities, in the context of community values
    and goals, in order to
  • Identify actions to address the issues,
    opportunities challenges
  • Focus E.D. efforts strategically
  • Identify potential resources
  • Work together to implement actions
  • Link to regional state efforts

11
Strategic Planning Benefits
  • Takes a proactive rather than reactive approach
  • More likely to result in solution of difficult
    problems
  • Provides an efficient process for reallocating
    resources to meet changing conditions
  • Creates a forum of dialogue between stakeholders
    and the organizations and agencies that serve
    them
  • Serves as an education to stakeholders about the
    functioning of organizations what they do and
    why
  • Provides an opportunity to focus on the forest
    rather than the trees to take time out from the
    urgent to do whats important

12
Economic Growth
  • Absolute changes in
  • Jobs
  • Population
  • Labor force
  • Traffic
  • Student enrollments
  • Building construction

13
Growth vs. Development
  • WEED PATCH
  • Unplanned
  • Change
  • Activity
  • Reactive
  • GARDEN
  • Planned
  • Improvement
  • Progress
  • Proactive

14
Growth vs. Development
  • Change is inevitable, like death and taxes
  • Communities and regions will change, whether they
    want to or not they will either grow or die
  • Change for the better doesnt just happen it
    takes planning and concerted effort
  • A community or region can either manage change,
    or be at the mercy of change

15
Economic Development is Happening When
  • The standard of living is increasing
  • A real increase in the level of average
    household income is occurring
  • The local tax base is meeting the escalating cost
    of government services
  • Business and industry is investing more in the
    community than they are costing the community
  • Commercial development usually subsidizes
    residential development which does not pay for
    itself

16
Economic Development
  • The process is facilitated through
  • Development of a skilled workforce
  • Investment in the physical infrastructure
  • Creation of new jobs at higher wages
  • Improvement of the business environment
  • Availability of marketable land and buildings
  • Maintenance of the environment
  • Improvement of the quality of life
  • Marketing promoting the community/region

17
National International Trends in Econ Devt
18
Major Trends Affecting Our Economic Situation
  • Global economy
  • Knowledge-based economy
  • E-manufacturing
  • Shift to services
  • Small business dominance
  • Focus on workforce education
  • Quality of life
  • Regionalism

19
Whats NEW About the New Economy?
  • Increasing percent of growing companies are
    globally integrated and pressing for open
    international trade
  • Increasingly digital and information driven
  • Transformation to e-businesses that use
    Internet-platforms for integrating their entire
    operation
  • Innovation leading to highly customized
    information, services, products (e.g., flexible
    production and mass customization supply chain
    management)
  • Highly networked entrepreneurs who both
    collaborate compete with one another
  • Growth areas have high concentrations of
    knowledge workers an ability to attract
    retain these workers
  • Highly mobile skilled labor force (job
    churning)

20
The Global Economy
  • A borderless economy with constant flow of
    currency, information, and technology
  • Multi-national corporations with globally
    integrated facilities
  • Quest for new or emerging markets in developing
    countries
  • Growth companies focusing on exporting and
    product standardization depending on open trade

21
Knowledge-Based Economy
  • Less about production and more about innovation
  • Based on advanced technology in computers
    telecommunications becoming a digital economy
  • U.S. leads the world in IT (at least for now…)
  • Fastest growing segment is software industry
  • Internet explosion globally
  • Critical shortage of skilled IT workers, and
    schools not responding fast enough.
  • Telecommunications infrastructure more important
    esp. to rural areas

22
E-Manufacturing
  • Integration of corporate activity using an
    Internet-based platform
  • Access to corporate and market information
    throughout the organization
  • Shift from mass production assembly
  • Flexible manufacturing systems
  • Mass customization
  • Lean manufacturing
  • Supply chain management
  • Outsourcing

23
E-Manufacturing
  • Shorter product life cycles leading to faster
    location decisions
  • Response by communities more time sensitive
  • Increased concern for zoning permitting
  • Need for existing trained workforce
  • More emphasis on existing available buildings

24
Services
  • 94 or more of all new jobs over next 10 years
  • Local expansion rather than attraction
  • Rapid growth in productivity
  • Job growth in computer, personnel, management
    consulting, professional services, health (China
    will graduate more P.E.s this year than U.S.)
  • High growth jobs are high wage, narrowing the
    wage gap with manufacturing
  • Grow in an environment of high quality of life
    attractive community

25
Small Business Dominance
  • Most new jobs from startup firms
  • Only a small percentage of small firms grow
    rapidly
  • Require business assistance and financing
  • High risk
  • More innovative succeed

26
Retooling the Workforce
  • Increased demand for technical professional
    skills
  • Focus on areas with pools of skills and
    graduating students
  • Need for continuing education
  • Increased emphasis within companies on training
    retraining
  • Greater concern with productivity than with wages
  • Ability to recruit retain technicians
    professionals

27
Looking for a Better Life
  • Availability of quality housing at reasonable
    costs
  • Strong basic skills in education
  • Presence of colleges/universities
  • Low crime rate
  • Good traffic flow
  • Lodging restaurants
  • Good medical health care
  • Attractive clean environment
  • Variety of retail customer services
  • Broad range of cultural recreational
    opportunities

28
Regionalism
  • Individual communities in a region cannot
    adequately solve the problems of urban sprawl,
    housing, transportation, water and sewer service,
    environmental issues, and enhanced quality of
    life
  • Business and industry draw their labor from a
    region, not one community
  • Collaboration within a region takes much more
    effort than within a more defined community
  • In other words, rival community members have to
  • stop sleeping in their lettermens jackets!

29
Community-Based Planning Process
  • Situation Assessment
  • Vision, Goals, Objectives
  • Targeting
  • Actions to Achieve Goals
  • Implementation
  • Ways to Measure Results
  • Resources

30
Situation Assessment
  • Socio-Economic Trends
  • Population (size, age, race, income, education)
  • Business trends ( of businesses by type, sales,
    retail leakage, tourism trends, workforce, wages,
    markets, challenges, etc.)
  • SWOT
  • Leadership, communication/conflict, existing
    organizations effectiveness
  • Infrastructure, housing, transportation, utility
    costs, regulations, econ devt services, real
    estate
  • QOL youth/elder services, crime rate,
    recreation, environment, etc.

31
Situation Assessment
  • Community Culture Values
  • Economic history industries, linkages
  • Cultural history, ethnic/religious groups, etc.
  • Changes in community key events, cultural
    dynamics, population shifts, etc.
  • Community dynamics leadership succession,
    shared decision-making (or not), vertical vs.
    horizontal relationships, formal vs. informal
    networks, etc.

32
Assessment Methods
  • Review previous planning efforts/documents
  • Understand history, stories of key figures/events
  • Socio-economic data, business inventory
  • Local assessment work (Gem Cmty, infrastructure
    studies, etc.)
  • 1-on-1 interviews (cross-section of community
    youth, srs, business, homemakers, natives,
    newcomers, private, public, nonprofit, education)
  • Surveys (online), focus groups
  • Public meetings to present summary of findings
    and observations (Reality Check)

33
Vision
  • There is no more powerful engine driving an
    organization toward excellence and long-range
    success than an attractive, worthwhile, and
    achievable vision of the future, widely shared.
  • (Burt Nanus, Visionary Leadership)

34
Vision
  • What do we want our future to hold for us?
  • What do we want to become,
  • -- and NOT become?
  • Vision is
  • An ideal and unique view of the future
  • Flows from the knowledge experience of the
    citizens and leaders
  • Gives a sense of purpose to the actions of the
    community/region and its organizations

35
An Effective Vision
  • Widely shared
  • Clearly articulated
  • Strongly committed to
  • Challenging but attainable
  • Highly desirable a substantial improvement on
    the present
  • Concise and memorable

36
Evolution of a Shared Vision
37
Value of the Vision
  • Provides focus for the communitys activities
  • Serves as a means of measuring progress
  • Energizes the communitys organizations and
    fosters commitment to their programs
  • Envisioning involves a belief that we can
    influence our economic destiny by what we do now.
  • The vision statement establishes the general
    direction that the strategic planning process
    should take. It defines the future of the
    community or its downtown as envisioned by local
    leadership. It is the "grand design" for local
    development.

38
Developing the Shared Vision
  • Identify individual vision of citizens and
    leaders
  • By 2010, what would you like to change or improve
    about the community?
  • By 2010, what would you like NOT to change about
    the community?
  • Identify and prioritize shared vision elements
  • From priority elements, develop a Vision
    Statement
  • One process is to use a structured workshop, in
    facilitated small groups, following a
    presentation of the assessment findings and
    trends (base)

39
  • Vision for Ritzville in 2020
  • In the next 20 years, Ritzville will grow both
    in its strength as the commercial focus of
    Eastern Washingtons wheat country and in its
    population, approaching its ideal level of
    approximately 2,500 residents. These residents
    will be comprised of an older-than-average
    population featuring many retirees who have
    chosen to live in Ritzville for a variety of
    special reasons including its small-town
    atmosphere, easy accessibility to big-town
    Spokane and Ritzvilles wide range of health care
    and recreational services.
  • Another element of the population, in response to
    advances in technology, will be the home-based
    business or technology entrepreneur. This segment
    will help enhance Ritzvilles economic resilience
    by providing a more diversified economy
    complementing the largely agriculture-driven
    incomes.
  • Two commercial areas, featuring regional
    commercial centers and lodging, will have
    continued to develop at the two interchanges
    serving the town, complementing the more
    specialized commercial nature of the central
    business district.
  • To accommodate this anticipated growth, Ritzville
    will have worked to improve and expand its water
    and sewer systems. Even in the face of growth,
    Ritzville will continue to offer the community
    stability, citizen involvement and unique
    character that have made it an attractive place
    to live and work.

40
Break!
41
The great thing in this world is not so much
where we are, but in what direction we are
moving.
Goals
  • Oliver Wendell Holmes

42
Goals
  • Stated as an achieved future condition that
    contributes to realization of vision
  • One method is to restate priority issues as goals
  • Issues are viewed as problems to be solved,
    concerns or needs to be addressed, or
    opportunities to be pursued
  • Problems
  • Constraints
  • Needs
  • Concerns
  • Attitudes
  • Unrealized opportunities / potential

43
Objectives
  • Specific, quantifiable measures of achievement
    toward goals
  • Increases in HH income, wages, of businesses,
    sales
  • Higher school enrollment, test scores, graduation
    rates
  • Increase in workforce training completed and
    placement
  • Improvements to specific measures of
    infrastructure
  • Improvements in water/air quality, maintenance of
    parks/streets/blighted areas, housing, health
    care
  • Communication between community groups, changes
    in public policy, involvement in meetings/events,
    etc.

44
Strategic Planning Targeting
  • Targeting public investments in infrastructure or
    resources that will improve competitive position
    and quality of life
  • Targeting marketing, business retention/
    expansion, and entrepreneurial efforts toward
    specific industries or clusters of industries
  • Targeting the development organizations time,
    talent, and money on those activities most likely
    to achieve desired results
  • Limited resources require FOCUS

45
Targeted Marketing
  • Local residents
  • Businesses
  • Industry sectors
  • Tourists
  • Regional residents
  • New residents

46
75 of businesses depend on wealth attracted from
outside the region by the 25 of companies with
national and global markets. Target businesses
that will bring new money!
47
Strategic Actions to Achieve Goals
  • Possible actions that can be taken to
  • Remove or to resolve causes of problems
  • Take advantage of opportunities
  • Actions are specific, achievable, with
    implement-able steps

48
Basis of Choice for Strategic Actions
  • Local goals objectives
  • Creating maximum positive impact on economy
  • Amount type of resources available
  • Level of commitment of leadership
  • Ability to measure results

49
Implementation Path Forward
50
Implementation
  • Identify implementation partners, roles
  • Determine lead/assist for each action
  • Establish priority level of each action
  • Set timeline for implementation of each action
  • Identify potential resources for implementation
    of each action
  • Create written Strategic Action Plan

51
Overview Strategic Action Plan
  • Situation assessment
  • Vision statement
  • Goals
  • Objectives Actions
  • Organizational responsibility
  • Funding needs and sources
  • Timing
  • Desired impact or results
  • Implementation partners, schedule, roles
  • Evaluation adjustment procedures
  • Resources for implementation

52
Partners
53
Action Table
54
Measuring Results
  • Measure progress by tracking results
  • First, establish benchmarks (existing conditions
    part of assessment)
  • Determine methods and responsibility for
    monitoring results of specific actions
  • Report annually on progress to stakeholders,
    media, funding partners, etc.

55
Next Steps
  • Suggested next steps in Action Plan
    implementation
  • Approval and adoption of final Action Plan
    document by City Council, Chamber of Commerce,
    EDC, etc.
  • Send copies of Action Plan to Idaho Commerce
    Labor, U.S. Economic Development Admin, USDA-RD,
    etc.
  • Endorsement of Action Plan by County Commission.
  • Endorsement and/or adoption of Action Plan by
    other community organizations.
  • Obtain commitments from partners to implement and
    report quarterly on progress (e.g., Presidents
    Council)
  • Begin implementation of the Economic Action Plan.
  • Monitor/oversee implementation of Plan, meet to
    discuss/report progress twice a year.

56
Resources for Implementation
  • Federal (www.grants.gov)
  • USDA grants for business devt projects (RBEG,
    RBOG), infrastructure financing, telecom,
    community projects (RCAG, RCA), NRCS
  • EDA Economic Development grants for business
    assistance, development
  • HUD Infrastructure funding (CDBG)
  • BIA Cooperative projects with tribes
    business/economic development, telecom, etc.
  • EPA Brownfields, environmental restoration
  • USFWS Habitat restoration, recreation access
  • NPS Challenge Cost Share
  • FHwA Scenic Byway, Enhancement grants
  • National Trust for Historic Preservation
    Preserve America, National Main Street Center
    (mainstreet.org)
  • NEA, NEH Arts and humanities projects

57
National Main Street Four Point Approach
Organization
Promotion
Issues
Economic Restructuring
Design
Strategic Integrated Solutions
58
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Resources (contd)
  • State
  • ICL Gem Community grants (GCA), Idaho Travel
    Council grants (ITC), Block Grants (HUD or
    State), business leads, tourism development
    assistance
  • ITD Scenic Byway grants, technical assistance
  • Idaho Parks Recreation recreation/RV/boating
    facilities
  • Idaho Fish Game tech assist re.
    hunting/fishing projects
  • Dept. of Agriculture technical assistance, pilot
    projects
  • Univ. of Idaho Extension community devt,
    ag-related assistance, consumer ed, leadership
    training, etc.
  • LCSC/SBDC Business/workforce training,
    hospitality training, business counseling
  • ICA, IHC Arts humanities projects
  • ICF, INDC Community grants, foundation
    management, training

64
Resources (contd)
  • Local
  • COGs Community planning, business loans, grant
    writing/admin, infrastructure grants/loans
  • City Infrastructure services, recreation
    facilities
  • County Roads, recreation facilities
  • Rec District Recreation facilities/programs
  • Local EDC Economic business development
    resources
  • Private
  • Businesses and corporate sponsors
  • Angel and Venture Capital investor groups
  • Corporate, conservation and community foundations
  • Charitable donations

65
Community-Based Planning Advice
  • Know the tables where decisions are made (coffee
    club)
  • BE AT THOSE TABLES
  • Aggressively communicate
  • KNOW YOUR MARKETS TARGET THEM
  • Know public opinion inform it.
  • WELCOME CRITICISM/DEBATE LISTEN RESPOND
    POSITIVELY, NOT DEFENSIVELY
  • Use planning process to build understanding/suppor
    t
  • Clarify, quantify benefits communicate them
  • Engage Community in learning/awareness
  • BUILD TEAMS/PARTNERS, NOT WALLS
  • Get partners to help advocate
  • Treat stakeholders like markets

66
Economic Development Players in Idaho
  • Idaho Commerce Labor Idaho Dept. of Ag
  • Idaho Economic Development Association (IEDA)
  • Idaho Rural Partnership (IRP)
  • Idaho Small Business Development Centers (SBDC)
  • Universities and colleges, including Extension
    K-12 education
  • Idaho National Lab, TechHelp
  • Tribes
  • USDA NRCS/RCD, USDA-RD
  • US Economic Development Administration (EDA)
  • US Housing Urban Development (HUD)
  • Regional Councils of Government (COGs) CEDA,
    Sage, PAC, etc.
  • Regional Tourism Associations
  • City and County economic development/planning
    staff
  • SBA Loan Program, Venture Capital firms, Angel
    investors, banks
  • Chambers of Commerce, business trade associations
  • Policy-makers (elected officials and staff)

67
Potential Roles for Extension
  • Portal to ivory tower link to resources w/in
    UI to assist businesses communities
  • Assist with community organization, assessment,
    visioning, prioritizing
  • Hold up an honest mirror
  • Provide training resources for leadership,
    collaboration, communication
  • Link communities to outside resources to assist
    them
  • Collaborate with other economic/community
    development players at regional/state level to
    avoid duplication, leverage resources
  • Link communities to Main Street program?
  • Other??

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Go forth and collaborate!
70
Questions?
Lorraine Roach The Hingston Roach Group,
Inc. (208) 983-2175, lroach_at_thrgroup.com
When the rate of change on the outside exceeds
the rate of change on the inside, the end is in
sight! - Jack Welch, former CEO, General Electric
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